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Full text of "Annual Report of the Commissioner of Conservation and State Forester (1920-1938)"

Document 



No. 73 



tontoealti) of ©a«0ac{)usett0 



AL R 



R OF CONSERVATION 




ATE FORESTER 



ung November 30, 1920 



:partment op Conservation 



32 DERNE 



'RINTERS 



Public Document 



No. 73 



Cfte Commontoealtl) of $©a00ac|)U0ett0 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF CONSERVATION 

AND 

STATE FORESTER 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1920 - 1938T 



yyUA/Uy \ Department of Conservation 




BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 
32 DERNE STREET 



JUN isi 



publication of this document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration. 



S7^ 



Cfte Commontoealtfi of e©a0$acJ)U0ett0 



To Me Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

I respectfully present herewith for your consideration my 
annual report as Commissioner of Conservation for the fiscal 
year ending Nov. 30, 1920. 

WILLIAM A. L. BAZELEY. 



CONTENTS. 



Part I. 



Report of Commissioner of Conservation. page 
Forestry. • • • • ... . . . . . .12 

Fish and Game, ... . . . . . . . . .13 

Animal Industry, ........... 14 

New Forest Law, ........... 15 

Mount Grace, . . . . . . . . . . .17 

Standish Monument Reservation, ........ 18 

Forest Fires, ............ 19 

Conventions, . . . . . . . . . . .19 

Financial Statements: 

Purchase and Development of State Forests, ..... 20 

Purchase of Mount Grace, ........ 21 

Maintenance of Standish Monument, . . . . . .21 

Recommendations : 

Division of Forestry, . . . . . . . . .21 

Division of Fisheries and Game, ....... 23 

Part II. 

Division of Forestry. 
Organization, . . . . . . . . . . .32 

State Plantations, . . . . . . . . . . .33 

Examinations, . . . . . . . . . . .35 

Nursery Work, ........... 35 

Tree Planting in 1920, 39 

Forest Survey of Hampshire County, ....... 40 

White Pine Blister Rust, . . . 40 

White Pine Weevil, . . _ . 41 

State Forests, 42 

Report of State Fire Warden, ......... 45 

Report of Superintendent of Gypsy Moth Work, . . . .53 

General Conditions, .......... 53 

Spraying Apparatus, . . . . . . . . .54 

Brown-tail Moths, . . . . . . . . . .54 

Cranberry Bog Work, ......... 55 

Satin Moth, . 55 

Lynn Woods, ........... 56 

Lumber Operations, . . . . . . . . .56 

State Highway Work, . . . . . . . . .57 

Federal Work, . . . . . . . . .57 

North Shore Work 59 

Appendix. 

Financial Statement, .......... 63 

Summary of Town Expenditures, ........ 64 

Distribution of Supplies, . . . . . . . . .7". 

Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests, ...... 74 

List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents, . . . .75 



OUTLINE OF REPORT. 



This report is divided for convenience and economy into 
four parts : — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of 

Conservation. 
Part II. The activities of the Division of Forestry. 
Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 
Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume, under Public 
Document No. 73. 

Part III is printed in a separate volume, under Public 
Document No. 25. 

Part IV is printed in a separate volume, under Public 
Document No. 98. 



Paet I 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CONSERVATION 



Cfie Commontoealtft of 90a$$acf)U0ett0 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF CONSERVATION. 



The Constitutional Convention, assembled in 1918, passed 
an amendment, later adopted by the people, by the pro- 
visions of which the Legislature was required to reorganize 
the executive and administrative work of the Commonwealth 
into not more than twenty departments. To do that without 
causing serious interruption to the numerous activities carried 
on by the various departments, boards, and commissions was 
recognized as a difficult task. The nature of the problem was 
such as to require very careful study and painstaking labor by 
the committee charged with its solution, and finally resulted in 
the passage of an act (chapter 350, General Acts of 1919) which 
embodied in a satisfactory manner the constitutional mandate. 

By this legislation was created the Department of Con- 
servation, into which were merged the office of the State 
Forester, the State Forest Commission, the Commission on 
Fisheries and Game, and the Department of Animal Industry. 
In accordance with the provisions of this act the Department 
was to be organized in three divisions, — namely, a Division 
of Forestry, a Division of Fisheries and Game, and a Division 
of Animal Industry, and to be under the supervision and con- 
trol of a commissioner, each division being under the charge 
of a director. The law further provided that the Commis- 
sioner of Conservation should be designated as director of one 
of the divisions. 

As Commissioner of Conservation His Excellency the 
Governor appointed William A. L. Bazeley of Uxbridge, at 
the same time designating him Director of the Division of 
Forestry; as Director of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
William C. Adams of Newton; and, as the Department of 



12 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Animal Industry was not abolished by the so-called consolida- 
tion act, but with its complete organization was placed in the 
Department of Conservation, Dr. Lester H. Howard of Boston 
has continued to direct the affairs of that division. As the 
act provided that the directors of divisions should act as 
advisers to the Commissioner, semi-monthly meetings have 
been held throughout the year at the office of the Commis- 
sioner, at which questions of a departmental nature have been 
determined by vote. In addition to the regular meetings the 
Commissioner found it necessary to call many special meetings 
to consider questions of more or less urgency. 

Conservation of Our Forests. 

There is no argument needed to convince those who have 
thought on the matter of the vital necessity for the earnest 
support by all people of a policy of wise conservation of our 
forests. Nowhere else has lumber been so potent a factor in 
development as in the United States. The houses in which 
our citizens dwell, the more than 200,000 miles of railroads, 
the development of our great industrial centers, our vast 
engineering projects, — in fact, that marvelous development 
in all the elements of power and prosperity which we enjoy, — 
have been due in no small measure to the lavish use of our 
forest products. The absolute necessity of maintaining this 
source of wealth is apparent. Conservation and perpetuation 
of our forests mean to so utilize them as to make them con- 
tinuous, which can be done only by spending money annually 
in reforesting our lands and securing to them adequate safe- 
guards from those agencies, such as fire and insects, which 
threaten to destroy them. 

Forestry is a comparatively new science in this country, and 
nowhere is there greater need for the adoption of its teachings, 
nor are the conditions for a broad forestry policy more favor- 
able, than in Massachusetts. It should be thoroughly under- 
stood that scientific forestry does not mean the 'utilization of 
soil suitable for agriculture, but only the retention for timber 
growing of lands less profitable for other purposes, which 
applies to more than one-half the area of Massachusetts. 

It is obvious that our forest problems differ in some respects 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



13 



from those of other States where virgin forests have been ac- 
quired by legislative enactment and are being scientifically 
managed. In Massachusetts the problem is essentially one of 
reclamation. 

Massachusetts, once self-supporting in lumber, now has to 
import 70 per cent of the amount used. This condition should 
not be allowed to continue. Our idle lands must be put to 
work. The people at large must be educated in the value and 
benefits to be derived from a permanent forest policy. 

Fish and Game. 

By the grouping of the activities of forestry and fisheries 
and game in the Department of Conservation the work which 
is closely interrelated in many respects was brought into 
fuller co-operation. 

It is an elementary principle that the protection and increase 
of the wild life of the State are dependent on a suitable en- 
vironment; that the most important requirement is sufficient 
forestation to afford the wild life hiding places from enemies, 
protection against the elements, and food supply. The forests 
can exist without the wild life. The wild life can exist in only 
limited numbers and species without the forests. 

The same propositions are true with respect to the inland 
fisheries. The vegetation of our forests graduates the melting 
snows, holding back the spring torrents which are injurious to 
our streams. In its shaded recesses are held the countless 
small reservoirs that insure sufficient water in the dry seasons. 
Its protection from the hot rays of the summer suns keeps 
the temperature of many brooks sufficiently low that fish may 
thrive in maximum numbers, and its dense covering along 
banks and shores affords great protection from predatory 
birds and animals. 

It is the function of one division to preserve and increase 
this great wealth of vegetation. It is the duty of the other 
division to protect the wild life thus harbored, and to assist 
by artificial propagation. Both divisions should work hand 
in hand in the education of the public to use wisely and enjoy 
moderately this natural wealth with which the Common- 
wealth was once so generously endowed. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Animal Industry. 

It is a well-recognized fact that the human race could not 
exist without the domestic animal. 

Each of the different species, therefore, commands our at- 
tention and demands its conservation to the greatest extent 
possible, as an important public work of the State and Nation. 
Domestic animals are not only producers of food for human 
consumption, but are recognized as necessary adjuncts to 
successful agriculture; important factors in the doing of the 
world's work, as indispensable in war as in peace; a means of 
recreation and pleasure to the people; and invaluable as mute 
servants in the manufacture of biological products for the 
preservation of the public health. 

The numbers of domestic animals propagated, produced, 
and raised to a point where they furnish the service demanded 
of them depend largely upon the prevention of contagious 
disease, or its control and eradication after its outbreak; and 
it is in this work, the conservation of animal life, that the 
Division of Animal Industry is actively engaged. 

To refer only to their value as food producers: it is esti- 
mated that 37 per cent of the food of the people of this country 
has for its source the domestic animal. This is represented by 
dairy products, such as milk, butter and cheese, and the 
meat value of their carcasses as beef, pork and mutton, either 
fresh, cured, or variously manufactured, if such carcasses are 
found healthy at time of slaughter. 

In a recent year, at seven of the principal packing houses in 
the United States, there was condemned as unfit for food, on 
account of lesions of one disease only (tuberculosis), what 
would amount to 50 train loads of 40 cars each of beef cattle. 

Millions of pounds of pork products are now saved yearly 
in Massachusetts through the immunization, by the Division 
of Animal Industry, of swine against their principal disease, — 
hog cholera. 

By this work in conservation of food-producing animals 
there is also made commercially possible the utilization of 
garbage for feeding purposes, which was formerly a great 
household waste. At the same time, and by the same means, 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT - No. 73. 



15 



what was formerly an unsafe project has become a present- 
day business success of no small dimensions. 

Lack of space precludes further reference to the conservation 
work of the Division of Animal Industry in many other direc- 
tions, notably its important relation to conservation of human 
life by the control of such animal diseases as are communicable 
to, and rapidly fatal in, the human subject. 

For further detail in regard to these matters we refer to the 
report of the Division of Animal Industry. 

New Forest Law. 
While from the time the State first committed itself to the 
practice of scientific forestry gradual yet encouraging progress 
has been witnessed, the passage of the forest bill at the last 
session of the General Court signalized the greatest advance- 
ment ever made in any one year. It may fairly be claimed 
that to the enthusiastic and untiring efforts of the Massachu- 
setts Forestry Association is due in large part the enactment 
of this legislation, although it should be noted that it also 
received the very earnest support of many prominent lumber 
operators. The importance of this act justifies us in printing 
its text in full. 

Chapter 604. 

Ax Act to provide for the Purchase and Development of State 

Forests. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The commissioner of conservation may purchase and 
hold additional lands within the commonwealth suitable for the produc- 
tion of timber to the extent of not more than one hundred thousand acres. 

Section 2. The said lands shall be purchased within a period of 
fifteen years at a rate not exceeding the maximum price per acre already 
fixed by section two of chapter seven hundred and twenty of the acts of 
nineteen hundred and fourteen, and acts in amendment thereof and addi- 
tion thereto, for the purchase of such lands, or at such price as the general 
court may from time to time determine. 

Section 3. The department of conservation shall proceed to reclaim 
the said lands, by replanting or otherwise, for the purpose of producing 
timber and protecting the water supply of the commonwealth. 

Section 4. The commissioner of conservation may in his discretion 
make rules and regulations relative to hunting and fishing or other uses of 
any lands acquired under the provisions of this act, provided that such 



16 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



rules and regulations shall be subject to any restrictions imposed by laws 
now or hereafter in force for the protection of fish, birds and quadrupeds. 
The provisions of chapter three hundred and sixty-two of the acts of 
nineteen hundred and nine shall not apply to lands acquired under this act. 

Section 5. Cities and towns may acquire by purchase, gift or be- 
quest lands for the purpose of forestation, at a rate not exceeding the 
maximum price per acre fixed by section two of said chapter seven hun- 
dred and twenty and acts in amendment thereof and addition thereto, 
and may reclaim and plant such lands; and the said department may, 
upon application in such form as the commissioner may prescribe, furnish 
such cities and towns, free of charge, with seedlings for the planting of 
their lands. 

Section 6. For the purpose of meeting the expenditures authorized 
by this act, the said department may expend during the said period of 
fifteen years such sums, not exceeding three million dollars, as the general 
court may from time to time appropriate. 

Section 7. This act is hereby declared to be in substance a substitute 
for the proposed law accompanying the initiative petition transmitted by 
the secretary of the commonwealth to the general court on the seventh 
day of January, nineteen hundred and twenty, and printed as house 
document number thirty-seven, and shall take effect on the day following 
the first Wednesday in August of the current year, provided that if the 
said initiative petition i< completed, as required by the constitution, by 
filing the required number of signatures on said first Wednesday, this act 
shall be void. [Approved June 4, 1920. 

Accomplishments under the Act. 

Because of the fact that the act did not take effect until 
August 5, only $50,000 was made available for use for the 
remainder of the fiscal year. During the three months in 
which the Commissioner has had to act he has succeeded in 
purchasing 5,339 acres of land, in five separate tracts, as well 
as adding some acres to the State forests already established. 
The new forests may be described as follows : — 

The Laurel Lake Forest is located in the easterly part of 
Erving, in Franklin County. It has a frontage of three- 
quarters of a mile on the Greenfield State road, and extends 
northerly 2 miles. It nearly surrounds a little pond known as 
Laurel Lake, hence the name. 

The Conway Forest is located in the south part of Conway. 
It takes in the watershed of Avery Brook, which is the source 
of water supply for Northampton, and adjoins 1,000 acres 
belonging to the water department of that city. 



Mount Grace as seen from Warwick Village. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



17 



The Tolland Forest is located in the south part of Tolland, 
on the Connecticut State line. This land was originally part 
of a large landed estate known as the Howell lands, the other 
part being in the town of Hartland, Conn. The State Forester 
of Connecticut is asking for an appropriation for State forests, 
and if he gets it may purchase the Howell lands in Connecti- 
cut, so that the reunited property will form a sort of interstate 
park. 

The Farmington River Forest is located in the northwestern 
part of Tolland, on the banks of the west branch of the Farm- 
ington River and the shores of Otis Reservoir, one of the 
largest bodies of fresh water in the State. 

Nearly ten years ago the Forestry Department acquired some 
500 acres of land on Christian - Hill, in the town of Colrain. 
This area has been entirely reforested, and contains our prize 
plantation of white pine. We have decided to turn this 
reforestation lot into a State forest by ^ng to it available 
adjoining lands, and have made arrangements to purchase 
400 acres additional. 

It has been the endeavp- oi the Department to acquire this 
land at a price less than 85 per acre, and we have been suc- 
cessful in securing it all at an average price of $4.50. We 
have been happily surprised at the amount of land available 
at this price and the high quality of most of it. Probably 
three-fourths of it is so well stocked with natural reproduction 
of good quality that it will never need to be artificially re- 
forested, but will be improved by the application of modern 
forestry methods. Of course the last 10,000 acres will come 
harder than the first, but we are greatly encouraged at the 
progress so far made. 

Mount Grace. 
It has long been the policy of Massachusetts, emulating the 
example of the Federal government as seen in our national 
parks, to preserve for ourselves and posterity certain tracts 
of land conspicuous for their scenic beauty, such as Mount 
Greylock, Mount Wachusett, the historic and beautiful Sugar 
Loaf, Purgatory Chasm, and other spots renowned for their 
beauty or historic value. It is an undisputed fact that the 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



wholesome pleasure which we derive from the contemplation of 
these beautiful gifts of nature arouses within us sentiments 
that serve to create a more loyal and higher order of citizen- 
ship. The General Court at its last session indicated its 
belief in the wisdom of continuing this policy by the passage 
of an act conferring upon the Commissioner of Conservation 
the necessary authority to acquire by purchase, or otherwise, 
Mount Grace, in the town of Warwick. Land acquisitions 
under this act began during November. At the close of the 
fiscal year there had been acquired 400 acres, at an average 
price per acre of $50. 

The purchases already made comprise most of the southern 
end of Mount Grace, extending from the site of the fire ob- 
servation tower to the main highway, which to a large extent 
constitutes the reservation's exterior boundary. It has been 
considered desirable, where possible, to acquire the Mount 
Grace lands with all the tree growth intact, and the pur- 
chases so far made include some excellent stands of forest 
trees, both conifers and hardwoods. Future cuttings, when it 
becomes advisable to make them, can be made in accordance 
with well-known forestry principles. The Mount Grace lands, 
when further purchases are completed, will constitute an 
excellent State reservation. The survey of the tract will be 
made during the year 1921. 

Standish Monument Reservation. 

Acting under the provisions of chapter 456 of the Acts of 
1920 the Standish Monument Association, on Aug. 6, 1920, 
conveyed to the Commonwealth the monument and grounds 
in the town of Duxbury, the same to be known hereafter as 
the Standish Monument Reservation, and to be under the con- 
trol and management of the Commissioner of Conservation. 

The erection of this monument was begun in 1872, and it is 
located on a part of the farm given to Capt. Myles Standish 
by the colony about 1630, and is commemorative of the genius 
and renown of the first military captain of the colonies. 

During the past few years the Standish Association has not 
been in a position to make necessary repairs on the property; 
therefore when it was taken over by the Commonwealth it 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



19 



presented a very unkempt appearance. Because of the great 
number of people who will undoubtedly visit the monument 
and stand upon its historic grounds during the tercentenary 
celebration, already opened, the Commissioner took prompt 
measures to cause the necessary repairs to be made on the 
monument and the approaches thereto. 

Forest Fires. 

As the first and most obvious necessity to the successful 
consummation of a forest policy is an adequate forest fire 
protective system, our faculties and energies have been directed 
to the establishment of such a system, and while the operation 
of this system has served to reduce to a marked degree the 
annual losses caused by forest fires, it may yet be strengthened 
and perfected. One of the most important features of a pro- 
gram designed to deal with this evil is the education of the 
people. It is generally admitted that 95 per cent of our 
forest fire waste arises primarily from the carelessness and 
more or less indifferent attitude of the general public. The 
writer believes that when we have succeeded in arousing and 
educating public opinion on this subject we shall have accom- 
plished much in the direction of reducing our forest fire losses 
to reasonable proportions, and securing a much more confident 
attitude toward general forestry. 

We cannot dismiss the subject of fire control without ex- 
pressing our appreciation of the commendable spirit mani- 
fested by the sportsmen throughout the State with respect to 
the suspension of the hunting season last fall by the Governor, 
on recommendation of the Commissioner of Conservation, which 
action was deemed expedient because of the extreme drought 
and consequent fire hazard. 

The report of the State Fire Warden, found in the report of 
the State Forester, records in detail the work accomplished 
along these lines during the past year. 

Conventions. 

The Commissioner has attended several conventions held 
outside the State during the past year where questions of 
moment relating to the work of conservation were discussed. 



20 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



These meetings were held under the auspices of the following 
organizations: — 

The American Plant Pest Control Committee, to consider the white pine 

blister rust problem, held at Albany, N. Y., in December. 
The Annual Meeting of the Society of American Foresters, held at New 

York, N. Y., in December. 
State Foresters and United States Forest Service, on the subject of forest 

fire prevention, held at Albany, N. Y., in February. 
The Annual Meeting of the American Game Protective Association, held 

at New York, N. Y., in March. 
New England Section of the Society of American Foresters, held at Keene, 

N. H., in August. 

Association of Northeastern Foresters, held at Grand Mere, Can., in 
August. 

Meeting of State Foresters, held at Atlantic City, N. J., in November. 

In addition to the above the Commissioner has attended 
several meetings of a similar nature held in Boston and else- 
where in the State, worthy of special notice being those held 
under the auspices of the Eastern Shook and Wooden Box 
Manufacturers Association, as they indicate the lively interest 
being taken by the lumber operators and manufacturers in the 
conservation movement. 

Financial Statement. 
Purchase and Development of State Forests. 

[Chapter 604, Acts of 1920.] 



Receipts. 

Appropriation (Aug. 5, 1920), $50,000 00 

Expenditures. 

Salaries, $942 75 

Travel, 332 30 

Maps, photographs, etc., . . . . . 62 85 

Equipment, 1,675 60 

Express, teaming, etc., . . . ... 24 88 

Sundries, 10 95 

Land, 24,475 00 

27,524 33 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1920, 



$22,475 67 



1921.]. PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 21 

Purchase of Mount Grace. 

[Chapter 606, Acts of 1920.] 



Receipts. 

Appropriation (June 5, 1920), $50,000 00 

Expenditures. 

Land, 20,250 00 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1920, $29,750 00 

Maintenance of Standish Monument. 

[Chapter 456, Acts of 1920.] 

Receipts. 

Appropriation for 1920, $3,000 00 

Expenditures. 

Salaries, $1,868 20 

Travel, 49 76 

Supplies, 849 07 

Equipment, 174 80 

Express, teaming, etc., 46 08 

Sundries, 4 49 

2,992 40 

Balance returned to treasury Nov. 30, 1920, ... $7 60 



Recommendations for Legislation. 
The following are the recommendations of the Commissioner 
for legislative action, all of which have been forwarded to the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth, together with drafts of the 
statutes which should be enacted to accomplish the end desired, 
in accordance with the provisions of chapter 131, General 
Acts of 1919. 

Division of Forestry. 
I. Establishment of the Mohawk Trail Reservation. — 
Probably nowhere east of the Rocky Mountains is there a 
highway passing through scenery of more sublime grandeur 
than the so-called Mohawk Trail. Since the completion of this 
highway hundreds of thousands of people from all parts of the 



22 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. . [Jan. 



United States have annually traveled over this route and 
gazed with delight upon the beautiful wooded mountains, 
rivers, passes and ridges which make the noble landscapes that 
lie around them. The impression which the wildness and 
majesty of the scenery make upon the senses is singularly 
grand and uplifting to those privileged to feast upon its 
loveliness. The Commonwealth can ill afford to jeopardize so 
valuable an asset. The devastating axe of the lumberman 
already threatens to destroy the forest growth on these slopes, 
and that their beauty shall not be marred the Commissioner 
believes that the Commonwealth should at once acquire, by 
purchase or otherwise, such lands as may be necessary to pre- 
serve the charm and beauty of this highway. The Commis- 
sioner therefore recommends the passage of an act to accom- 
plish this purpose. 

II. Appointment of Forest Wardens. — The statutes provide 
for the appointment in the month of January, by the mayor 
and aldermen in cities and the selectmen in towns, of a forest 
warden. It frequently happens, especially in the smaller 
towns, that through an oversight or some other cause such 
appointment is not made. This always renders it difficult to 
properly organize the fire prevention system before the 
dangerous season opens. For that reason the Commissioner 
recommends the enactment of a law authorizing him to fill 
such vacancy. 

III. Forest Fire Warden Conventions. — Recognizing the 
great value derived from an annual convention of the forest 
fire wardens for the purpose of discussing methods of fire 
fighting and improved equipment, the Commissioner believes 
that the law should be so amended as to make attendance upon 
such conventions one of the duties of forest wardens. 

IV. Reimbursement of Towns for Loss of Taxes. — The 
Commissioner holds the opinion that a statute should be 
enacted by which the State forests shall be more equitably 
taxed. Under the present law the Tax Commissioner is re- 
quired to make a valuation once every five years. Therefore 
it could frequently happen that after the removal of forest 
products the valuation would remain unchanged until a new 
valuation was made, which might be several years. The 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



23 



Commissioner believes that the law should be so amended as 
to provide for the reduction of the valuation to correspond 
with the value of the forest products removed from such 
land, and recommends the passage of an act to accomplish 
this purpose. 

V. Exemption from Civil Service. — Because of the fact 
that in the purchase and development of State forests many- 
persons are employed temporarily when immediate service is 
required, the Commissioner recommends that such employees 
be not subject to the rules and regulations required by civil 
service. 

VI. Replacement of Forest Fire Equipment. — For the pur- 
pose of strengthening the forest fire protective system, and 
to encourage towns to become properly equipped with fire- 
fighting apparatus, a law was enacted in 1910 providing for 
the partial reimbursement of certain towns for the cost of such 
equipment. This law has now been in force ten years, and 
nearly all the towns entitled to come within the provisions of 
the act have availed themselves of the opportunity. In many 
of these towns long use has caused deterioration of the equip- 
ment to a point where replacement has become a necessity. 
The Commissioner is of the opinion that the State may very 
wisely continue its policy of aiding these towns by reimbursing 
them a certain amount of the cost of renewing such apparatus 
as may now be unserviceable. 

VII. Extending the Time of the Hunting Season. — The 
Commissioner considers that justice to the sportsmen of the 
Commonwealth requires that the law empowering the Governor 
to suspend the hunting season during periods of extreme 
drought so as to prevent forest fires should be so amended as 
to provide that the said season be extended for a number of 
days equal to the number it was found necessary to suspend 
it. The Commissioner therefore recommends the passage of 
an act to accomplish this purpose. 

Division of Fisheries and Game. 
I. To amend the Laio relative to issuing Hunting and Fishing 
Licenses. — The present law requires licenses for fishing in 
only those inland waters which have been stocked by this 



24 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Department since Jan. 1, 1910. The publication yearly of 
lists of waters stocked during the year involves considerable 
expense. Further, by reason of the fact that many streams 
are known by various names, much confusion is created in 
the minds of persons who wish to determine whether a stream 
has or has not been stocked. Many of the unstocked inland 
waters are being depleted, and we believe they should be 
protected by requiring licenses for fishing therein. 

A person wishing to secure a duplicate of a lost or destroyed 
license is required by the present law to apply, either in person 
or by letter, at the office of the Division of Fisheries and 
Game. This is an inconvenience to the public, and creates a 
volume of work in the office of the division at the busiest 
season of the year. An amendment permitting the issuance 
of duplicates by city and town clerks will remedy this, and 
the 25-cent fee will have the effect of reducing the number of 
licenses lost. 

Under the existing law there is no limit to the amount of 
fish or game which a non-resident may take out of the State 
under his license, except in the case of birds and brook trout. 
Inasmuch as the Department is bending every effort to con- 
serve the supply of wild life within the Commonwealth, it 
seems only just and fair that a limit be set. 

II. To provide a Penalty for destroying or injuring Private 
Property while Hunting, Trapping or Fishing. — Instances have 
occurred where thoughtless hunters and fishermen have de- 
stroyed or injured private property while pursuing their sport. 
In order to safeguard the rights of landowners; to secure for 
the Fish and Game Division their hearty co-operation in the 
conservation of wild life rather than their condemnation of 
all things relating to hunting and fishing; and to spare the 
true sportsman the injustice of being obliged to share the 
blame for the deeds of the unmindful, we believe that the 
accompanying bill is timely and necessary. 

III. To empower Fish and Game Wardens to arrest Persons 
who assault them or interfere with them in the Performance of 
their Duties. — At the present time the fish and game wardens 
have no authority to forthwith arrest persons who would 
assault them or interfere with them in the performance of 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



25 



their duties. Much of their work being done at night, when 
recognition of such persons is impossible, without the power 
of arrest on the spot there is no redress for the wardens. A 
case in point occurred a short time ago when two wardens were 
attacked and forced to take to cover to protect themselves 
from injury, since they had no right to charge the crowd and 
arrest the offenders. 

IV. To provide for Payment for Damage caused by Moose. — 
Many times the moose which are at large in the Commonwealth 
have caused damage to private property. We deem it fair and 
just that compensation for such damage should be paid as in 
the case of damage done by deer. 

V. To regulate the Release within the Commonwealth of 
Wild Birds or Animals. — Cases have come to our attention 
of the liberation, by breeders, of game birds or animals, or 
sick or diseased stock. To safeguard the health of the stock 
in the wild, we deem it necessary to reserve the right to 
judge what fish or animals may be liberated. The liberation 
of fish in waters of the Commonwealth is already, by law, 
placed under the control of the Department. 

VI. To correct the Laic relating to Fur-bearing Animals.' — 
Because of the omission of the month of March from the open 
season on muskrats, and because the section relating to the 
training of dogs is not plain to the layman, amendment of the 
law is necessary as set forth in the accompanying act. 

VII. To permit the Importation into Massachusetts of Fish 
and Game taken legally outside the Commonwealth, and to permit 
Possession of Such Fish and Game after the Close of the Season. — 
The present laws permit the taking of a bag limit of fish and 
game on the last day of the open seasons; but the person 
taking it cannot reasonably be expected to dispose of the 
same immediately. The accompanying act will give a reason- 
able length of time for the disposal of game and fish legally 
taken during the open season. It will also permit the im- 
portation and possession, after the close of seasons in Massa- 
chusetts, of fish and game taken legally outside of the Com- 
monwealth. 

VIII. To permit the Importation of European or Gray 
Partridge. — In order to encourage the local breeding of 



26 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. . [Jan. 



European or gray partridge, this species was not mentioned in 
section 5 of chapter 567, Acts of 1912, among the species which 
might be imported from without the United States. But as 
no disposition has been shown by local breeders to propagate 
them, it appears advisable to meet the demand for these birds 
by authorizing their importation. For this reason we recom- 
mend that this species be included in the birds named in 
section 5 of said act. 

IX. To permit the Killing or Trapping of Predatory Birds 
or Animals within Reservations. — The authority for the issu- 
ance of permits to destroy harmful birds or animals on reserva- 
tions is limited, by section 4, chapter 410, Acts of 1911, to is- 
suance to wardens or owners or occupants of land within the 
reservations. For the better protection of useful wild life it 
is desirable that the Department's authority be extended to 
the issuance of permits to any responsible person who may be 
willing to assist in the destruction of undesirable species. 

X. To amend the Law pertaining to Wild or Undomesticated 
Birds. — Section 7, chapter 92, of the Revised Laws was 
enacted before ducks, geese and waterfowl were protected by 
law. It is now necessary to omit these species from the law 
in order to avoid conflict with subsequent laws. 

XL To make the Laws of Massachusetts relative to Migratory 
Birds conform with the Laws of the United States. — The Federal 
government has entered into a treaty with Great Britain for 
the uniform protection of migratory birds on the American 
continent. The Federal laws in this connection render con- 
flicting State laws void. For the convenience of the public, 
and for the proper enforcement of the law, it is desirable to 
have the laws of this Commonwealth conform with the Federal 
rules and regulations. 

XII. To regulate the Catching and Sale of Fresh-water Fish. — 
Winter fishing and absence of restriction on the sale of pond 
fish have been two of the principal causes of the depletion of 
inland fisheries during the past few years. Progressive con- 
servation demands that catch and sale limits be established. 

XIII. To permit the Taking of Eels in the Vicinity of 
Hingham Harbor. — Inasmuch as eels have done much damage 
to the smelt fisheries in this vicinity, which 'are the principal 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



27 



remaining smelt fisheries of the State, the taking of eels in this 
locality should be permitted, notwithstanding the provisions 
of chapter 27, General Acts of 1916. 

XIV. To regulate the Taking of Lobsters. — The laws of 
Rhode Island, Connecticut and Xew York provide for the 
measurement of lobsters according to the so-called body 
measure. The State of Maine this year proposes to amend 
its law so as to adopt the same method, with a view to further- 
ing the movement for a uniform measure for Xew England and 
Xew York. Uniform method of measurement will increase 
the chance for co-operation among the adjacent States. The 
size of legal lobsters will remain practically the same, and the 
chance for confusion will be eliminated. 

XV. Relative to taking Fresh-water Fish. — The increased 
number of fishermen, the accessibility of waters by reason of 
the automobile, the great expense of artificial propagation on 
a scale sufficient to meet the requirements, make it imperative 
that the taking of fresh-water fish from our inland waters 
should be limited to a reasonable number per day. 



Part II 



EEPOET OF THE DIVISION OF FOEESTEY 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY. 



Naturally the first matter to which the State Forester di- 
rected his attention upon assuming control of the Division 
of Forestry was to acquaint himself with the personnel of its 
organization and their work. A careful study of the duties 
and responsibility of each disclosed the existence of more or 
less overlapping of functions and a certain amount of in- 
definiteness with respect to authority, which was a condition 
not conducive to securing the fullest measure of efficiency. A 
reorganization was effected whereby the duties and authority 
of each member of the organization were so clearly outlined 
as to remove all uncertainty with respect to responsibility. 
The wisdom of this action is reflected in the increased con- 
fidence and interest in their work of the entire personnel. 

In pursuance of this policy Mr. Harold O. Cook was recalled 
to the Department and made chief forester, which position 
calls for a technical forestry education and training. Mr. 
James Morris was given charge of all the forest nurseries. 
Mr. Frank L. Haynes was placed in charge of the then existing 
State forests, as he had been formerly the forest examiner 
for the State Forest Commission. Mr. R. B. Parmenter, one 
of the field foremen, but a forester by profession, was made 
assistant forester, and has been doing examination and other 
technical work for Mr. Cook. Mr. Francis V. Learoyd, who 
had served as purchasing agent and district forest warden, 
was made business agent and put in charge of all the pur- 
chasing of the Department. 

Late in the fall, as the work of purchasing land under 
chapter 604, Aqts of 1920, was taken up, the work of examina- 
tion and other necessary matters connected with the acquisition 
of the new State forests were placed in the hands of Mr. 
Frank L. Haynes, and the care of the five State forests already 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



acquired was turned over to Mr. Maxwell C. Hutchins, the 
State Fire Warden. The work of gypsy-moth thinnings as 
carried on by the moth department for several years was dis- 
continued, and Mr. Paul D. Kneeland left the service of the 
State Forester to accept a position with the Baker Box Com- 
pany. All gypsy-moth work was placed directly in the hands 
of Mr. George A. Smith, the superintendent, and he was given 
full authority over all employees in this branch of the work. 
Mr. John H. Montle, observer at Fall River, was promoted 
to the position of district forest warden, left vacant by the 
promotion of Mr. Learoyd. 

The present organization is as follows: — 



Organization. 

William A. L. Bazeley, . . . Commissioner and State Forester. 



FORESTRY DIVISION. 



Charles O. Bailey, 
Elizabeth Hubbard, . 
Elizabeth T. Harraghy, 
Jennie D. Kenyon, 
Mabel R. Hamnett, . 
Dorothy J. Sanford, . 



General Staff. 

Secretary. 

Senior clerk. 
. Stenographer. 
. Stenographer. 
. Clerk. 

. Assistant clerk. 



Harold O. Cook, 
Frank L. Haynes, 
James Morris, 
Robert B. Parmenter, 
John A. Palmer, 
Fred W. Parker, 
Eben Smith, 



General Forestry. 

Chief forester. 
Assistant forester. 
Assistant forester. 
Assistant forester. 
Superintendent, Amherst Nursery. 
Superintendent, Bridgewater Nursery. 
Superintendent, Barnstable Nursery. 



Moth Work. 

George A. Smith, .... Superintendent. 
Francis V. Learoyd, .... Business agent. 



1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly. 

2. William A. Hatch, Marlborough. 

3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill. 



Moth Men. 

4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Fox- 

borough. 

5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzard's Bay. 

6. Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester. 



1921.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 33 



Forest Fire Prevention. 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, . . . State Fire Warden. 
Josepha L. Gallagher, . . . Clerk. 



District Fire Wardens. 



1. James E. Moloy, Wo burn. 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River. 

3. Joseph J. Shepherd, Pembroke. 



4. John P. Crowe, Westborough. 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield. 



Observers and Loci 
Mrs. John Condon, Harwich. 
Joseph W. Jenkins, Barnstable. 
Mrs. W. I. Moody, Falmouth. 
W. F. Raymond, Bourne. 
F. L. Buckingham, Kingston. 
Mrs. Allan Keniston, Martha's Vine- 
yard. 

S. Edward Matthews, Middleborough. 
George T. Moffett, Fall River. 
R. J. Zilch, Rehoboth. 
Chas. F. Kimball, Hanson. 
Edward D. Sprague, Hingham. 
F. J. Kustenmacher, Sharon. 
Fred R. Stone, Sudbury. 
Wm. H. Tyzzer, Jr., Wakefield. 
C. E. Blood, Chelmsford. 
Leon S. Gifford, Georgetown. 
Caplis McCormack, Manchester. 
Robert McLaughlin, Mendon. 



m of Fire Towers. 

William E. Howarth, Westborough. 
James W. Maley, Wachusett Mountain. 
Mark W. SHArrucK.Watatic Mountain. 
Wm. E. Taylor, Warwick. 
Harland Burrows, Pelham. 
Mary E. Haley, Brimfield. 
Thomas Magovern, Charlton. 
Timothy Shea, Mount Tom. 
N. C. Woodward, Shelburne Falls. 
H. H. Fitzroy, Savoy. 
David M. Smith, Waltham. 
Frank Wilson, Chester. 
John E. Curtin, Tolland. 
Frederick K. Shears, Mount Everett. 
Robert Miller, Lenox. 
Harry George, Williamstown. 
Alton B. Ellis, Acushnet. 
Alva Sikes, West Brookfield. 
Eugene Sullivan, Agawam. 



State Plantations. 

Because of the high cost and scarcity of labor in rural 
districts work on the plantations has been considerably cur- 
tailed. Inasmuch as a considerable proportion of these planta- 
tions are subject to redemption on the part of the original 
owner the Department is very loath to place any expense on 
them except where conditions call for immediate attention. 

Five new lots were taken over this year. Planting was 
done on eight lots, and brush cutting on fourteen. We have 
changed our methods of releasing planted pine from suppression 
by hardwood sprouts by trimming around individual trees 
rather than by clear cutting of the sprout growth. We find 
this method less expensive, and in some ways it gives better 
results. 



34 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 

The following is a tabulated list of the work done: — 



Reforestation Work. 
Planting. 

[W. p. = white pine; s.=spruce; r. p.=red pine.] 





Town. 


Area 
(Acres). 


Trees. 


Baker-Hurd 


Rutland-Barre, 


132 


35,000 w. p. 
3,000 s. 
1,000 r. p. . 






10 


10,000 w. p. 








2,000 w. p. 


Hanson, . ' . 


Marlborough, .... 


95 


1,000 w. p. 




South Hadley, .... 


25 


7,000 w. p. 


Hodgman 


Montague 


26 


4,000 w. p. 
4,000 r. p. 




Ashburnham, .... 




32,500 w. p. 
7,500 r. p. 


Spencer Wire Company, 


Spencer 




7,000 w. p. 








114,000 


Brushing. 


Lot. 


Town. 


Area 
(Acres). 


Brushed. 






43 




43 




Oakham, ..... 


VA 




Cadwell 




6 




6 


Cadwell 




16 




14 






200 




25 


Clark 


Paxton, 


45 




45 






80 




20 


Fullam, . . . . • . 


North Brookfield, 


5 




4 


Lawrence 


Fitchburg, . 


27 




15 




Colrain, 


80 


5 


Robertson & Larkin, . 




80 




40 




Ashburnham, . . . . 


80 


15 


Spencer Wire Company, 




8 




2 




East Brookfield, 


37 


10 


Total, " 






245 





1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 35 

Examinations. 

Private owners to the number of sixty-nine applied for ex- 
amination of their woodlands and advice on the treatment 
thereof. This is a considerable advance over the number that 
applied last year. We should feel encouraged if it were not 
that such a large percentage of these applications were simply 
for help in the lumbering of their property and an estimate 
of the stand. However, we often find an opportunity of giving 
some good forestry advice even under such conditions. 



Examinations. 



Subject. 


Number. 


Acres. 


Operating and estimating, 


17 


1,226 


Planting 


14 


1,314 




10 


811 




8 


425 




9 


118 




3 


76 




8 


2,045 


Totals 


69 


6,015 



Nursery Work. 
Under this heading we include the operations of our three 
principal nurseries at Amherst, Bridgewater and Barnstable. 
The nurseries located on the State forests are considered to be 
a part of these reservations, and their operation is made a part 
of the report on the individual State forests. The product of 
our nurseries is divided for convenience into three classes, ac- 
cording to its destination: first, the stock used by the Depart- 
ment, largely in the reforesting of State forests and State 
plantations; second, stock supplied free of cost to other State 
departments; and third, stock sold to private owners. For the 
first purpose, 820,000 trees were used; for the second, 250,000; 
and for the third, 343,000. The total is somewhat less than 
that of last year, because the stock available in our nurseries 
was less. We are glad to report, however, that the stock 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



available for distribution next year is larger in amount than in 
any previous year, and is in excess of two and one-half million 
four-year-old transplants. This is indeed fortunate, for with 
our new State forest program we shall have need of every 
transplant that we can raise. 



Stock shipped to Forestry Department. 



Species. 


Class. 


Number. 


White pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


388,000 


White pine, 


3-year transplants, .... 


50,000 


White pine, 


2-year seedlings 


60,000 


Red pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


100,500 


Jack pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


15,000 


Scotch pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


2,500 


Spruce, 


4-year transplants, .... 


144,000 


Spruce, 


2-year seedlings 


' 60,000 


Total 




820,000 


Stock sold to Private Owners. 




Species. 


Class. 


Number. 


White pine 


4-year transplants, .... 


218,430 


White pine, 


3-year transplants, .... 


3,000 


N 






Scotch pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


21,865 


Scotch pine 


3-year transplants, .... 


7,100 


Norway spruce 


5-year transplants, .... 


9,750 


Norway spruce 


4-year transplants, .... 


23,700 


Norway spruce 


3-year transplants, .... 


20,025 


Arbor vitae, 


4-year transplants, .... 


2,700 


Austrian pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


11,125 


Red pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


23,315 


Jack pine, 


3-year transplants, .... 


2,890 


Total, 




343,900 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 37 



Stock shipped to Other State Departments. 



Species. 


Class. 


Number. 


White pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


161,500 


Red pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


45,600 


Austrian pine 


4-year transplants, . 


11,000 


Scotch pine, 


4-year transplants, .... 


11,500 


Jack pine 


4-year transplants, .... 


11,000 


Arbor vitae, 


4-year transplants, .... 


2,700 


Norway spruce, 


4-year transplants, .... 


8,550 


Total 




251,850 



Inventory of Nursery Stock, Spring of 1921. 
Amherst Nursery. 



Species. 


4- Year 
Transplants. 


3-Year 
Transplants. 


Seedlings. 


Seedlings. 


Scotch pine, 

European larch 

Hemlock 

Douglas fir, 

Arbor vitae, 

Austrian pine 


554,000 
240,000 
32,000 
16,000 
15,000 


140,000 
250,000 

200,000 
1,500 
1,000 


275,000 
152,000 

60,000 
6,000 


360,000 
542,000 

2,170,000 

160,000 
100,000 


Totals, . . . . . 


857,000 


592,500 


493,000 


3,332,000 


Barnstable Nursery. 


Red pine, 

Norway spruce, 

Jack pine or banks 

Larch, 


375,000 
9,000 
45,000 
8,000 

9,000 


298,000 
15,000 

30,500 


30,000 
16,000 

129,000 
25,000 


85,000 
203,000 

80,000 

70,000 
8,000 


Totals, 


446,000 


343,500 


200,000 


446,000 



38 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 

Bridgewater Nursery. 



[Jan. 



Species. 


4-Year 
Transplants. 


3-Year 
Transplants. 


Seedlings. 


Seedlings. 


White pine, • • • . . 
Norway spruce, 


413,000 
50,000 

112,600 
49,000 
24,600 


351,000 
180,000 






640,900 


531,300 







Norfolk Nursery. 



White pine, 



20,000 



Total Four-year Stock in Nurseries. 

Amherst, 857,000 

Barnstable 446,000 

Bridgewater 649,200 

Norfolk, 20,000 

Total 1,972,200 



State Forest Nurseries. 
Otter River Nursery. 



Species. 


4-Year 
Transplants. 


3-Year 
Transplants. 


Seedlings. 


Seedlings. 


Total, 


110,000 
80,000 








190,000 








Savoy Mountain Nursery. 


White pine, 

Spruce, ...... 

Totals 


30,000 


60,000 






30,000 


60,000 






Arthur Warton Swann Nursery. 




8,000 


12,500 







1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 39 



State Forest Nurseries — Con. 



Myles Standish Nursery. 



Species. 


4-Year 
Transplants. 


3-Year 
Transplants. 


Seedlings. 


Seedlings. 




325,000 




50,000 





Total Four-year Stock in State Forest Nurseries. 



Otter River, 190,000 

Savoy Mountain, 30,000 

Arthur Warton Swann 8,000 

Myles Standish 325,000 



Total 553,000 



Tree Planting in 1920. 
A total of 343,000 evergreen trees of a variety of species 
was shipped from our nurseries and planted during the spring 
of 1920. The stock was sold to the public at an average price 
of $10 per thousand. These trees were distributed throughout 
the State and planted in the following 52 towns and cities: — 



Amherst, 


. 2,000 


Millbury, 


. 2,000 


Barnstable, . 


. 2,000 


MiUville, 


. 5,000 


Barre, .... 


. 2,000 


Milton, .... 


. 3,000 


Becket, .... 


. 2,000 


Natick, .... 


. 1,000 


Bellingham, . 


. 1,000 


Newton, 


. 1,250 


Boxford, 


. 1,000 


North Brookfield, 


. 6,000 


Brockton, 


. 2,000 


Northampton, 


. 13,000 


Brookline, . 


. 2,000 


Oxford, . 


500 


Carver, .... 


. 2,000 


Palmer, . 


. 4,000 


Chatham, 


. 10,600 


Plymouth, . 


. 6,000 


Chelsea, 


. 2,000 


Quincy, . 


. 2,000 


Chester, 


. 7,000 


Rutland, 


. 1,000 


Colrain, 


. 7,500 


Sharon, . 


750 


Concord, 


. 3,700 


Southbridge, 


. 1,000 


Falmouth, . 


. 2,000 


Springfield, . 


. 3,200 


Fitchburg, . 


. 95,000 


Topsfield, 


. 4,000 


Framingham, 


. 20,000 


Tyngsborough, . 


. 20,000 


Great Barrington, 


. 1,000 


Wakefield, . 


. 6,000 


Greenfield, . 


. 1,000 


Waltham, 


. 10,000 


Harvard, 


. 9,200 


Wareham, 


. 5,000 


Hingham, 


. 3,000 


Watertown, . 


300 


Holyoke, 


. 10,000 


Wayland, 


. 20,000 


Hudson, 


. 13,000 


Westford, 


500 


Leominster, . 


. 6,000 


Westminster, 


. 2,000 


Marblehead, 


300 


Winchester, . 


. 14,100 


Mattapoisett, 


. 1,000 | Worcester, . 


. 4,000 



40 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Forest Survey of Hampshire County. 
In continuation of our policy to obtain a complete estimate 
survey of the woodland conditions of the Commonwealth we 
began work this year in Hampshire County. The following 
eight towns were surveyed: Easthampton, Northampton, 
Southampton, Williamsburg, Cummington, Plainfield, Worth- 
ington and Middlefield. The field work was done during the 
vacation period, which enabled us to secure the services of 
students from some of the leading forest schools at small 
expense. 

The completion of the work in this county is contemplated 
next summer, and the data obtained will probably be published 
in the form of a bulletin soon after that time. Worcester 
County and Plymouth County have already been surveyed, 
and bulletins covering the work done in these two counties 
may be obtained upon application. It is hoped that this 
important work will be continued without interruption until 
we have a complete inventory of the forest resources of the 
Commonwealth. 

White Pine Blister Rust. 
We have continued, as in former years, to co-operate with 
the Department of Agriculture in its endeavor to check the 
spread of the white pine blister rust, to which much publicity 
has been given during the past few years. As this important 
work is by statute placed under the jurisdiction of the De- 
partment of Agriculture, the nature of the operations carried on 
and progress made in controlling it may be found set forth in 
detail in the annual report of that department, which is ac- 
cessible for reference. Attention is called, however, to the work 
conducted on the Otter River State Forest in an effort to re- 
move wild currant and gooseberry plants. Of the 2,000 acres 
in this forest 1,300 were carefully scouted, and 393,000 plants 
were removed. The total cost of this operation was approxi- 
mately $2,000. The cost was divided among this Department, 
the Department of Agriculture, and the Federal Bureau of 
Plant Industry. The labor was performed largely by permanent 
employees on the reservation, and we are pleased to state that 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



41 



the character of their work was very highly commended by the 
Federal inspectors. The necessary work on the remaining 
700 acres is contemplated next season. 

That the danger from this disease is not as serious as at one 
time feared is indicated by the resolution adopted by the 
American Plant Pest Control Committee at its meeting held 
in Boston, Nov. 5 and 6, 1920, which declared, in substance, 
that the planting of white pine may be continued with com- 
parative safety, provided that all ribes within infected areas, 
and at least 200 yards from pine stands, is removed. 

White Pine Weevil. 
An arrangement has been made between the State Forester 
and the Harvard Forest at Petersham, Mass., for a co-operative 
study of the white pine weevil in relation to forest management. 
In spite of the wide prevalence of this insect, especially on 
plantations, there is little exact information, either as to the 
ultimate damage it produces in a timber crop, its distribution 
as affected by the composition of the forest and other natural 
factors, or any silvicultural measures by which its depredations 
may be controlled or minimized. It is possible that the 
damage to the final yield in timber has been overestimated. 
Possibly, too, the spread of the beetle can be checked by 
regulation of the species represented in the stand. To investi- 
gate these questions Mr. H. B. Peirson, a forest entomologist, 
now working on the Harvard Forest, has been appointed by 
the State Forester a collaborator of the Division of Forestry. 
He will carry on a considerable part of the work at Petersham, 
but the State Forester has provided means for him to visit 
also a large number of localities throughout the State, so that 
the infestations of the weevil can be studied under all con- 
ditions. In view of the large program of reforestation which 
the State is undertaking it is highly important to find out in 
advance to what extent planting plans and methods of treating 
existing young woods can, or should, be modified to meet so 
apparently destructive a pest. 



42 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



State Forests. 

The work accomplished during the past year on the five 
State forests acquired under the provisions of chapter 720, 
Acts of 1914, has constituted in the main a continuance of the 
same lines of work undertaken on them in previous years, 
such as planting, nurseries, road and boundary clearing, sur- 
veying, and a small amount of thinning. Owing to the un- 
usual labor conditions prevailing during most of the year, 
and especially during the planting season, much of the work 
done has necessarily been affected, both as to costs and amount 
accomplished, and also to a certain extent as to quality. 

A general outline of the work done on the five forests is as 
follows : — 

Myles Standish State Forest. 
During January, February and March the cutting out of 
roads and burning of brush were carried on as far as possible 
with a few men, and under the handicap of the unusually heavy 
snows. 

The planting season began on April 7 and continued until 
June 1. During this period the field reports give a total of 
333,000 four-year-old white, red and Scotch pine transplants 
as having been set out in the field. During the planting 
season a total of 75 men were employed in order to keep the 
crews full. The rate of pay averaged $3 per day and board, 
and the cost of planting, 5j>11.72 per thousand plants. 

Nurseries. 

About 60,000 two-year-old white pine seedlings from the 
Barnstable nursery were transplanted in beds on this reserva- 
tion, and the old nursery was weeded from time to time. 
There are at the present time 300,000 four-year-old white pine 
transplants available for field use in 1921. 

Roads and Boundaries. 
The road clearing and maintenance work begun during the 
winter was continued after the planting season ended. During 
the year several miles of the main roads on the north half of 




Fire lines brushed but not ploughed. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



43 



the reservation were cleared of brush on the sides, so that at 
the present time they are well open for the passage of automo- 
biles and fire equipment. Owing to the size of the reservation 
there is still a large amount of road-clearing work to be done 
during another year, in order that the entire reserve may be 
more readily accessible and usable. 

For the purpose of making fire lines for this and other 
reservations a Cleveland tractor and a strong plow were pur- 
chased in October. This tractor has been in use on the Myles 
Standish State Forest in breaking fire lines around a portion 
of the west boundaries, and is proving entirely satisfactory. 
Up to date about 8,000 feet of lines have been plowed to a 
width of 12 to 15 feet, and the work is still in progress. 

Camp Sites. 

A few additional camp-site permits were issued during 1920 
for use on this reservation. Four new camps were erected at 
College Pond, but owing to the excessive cost of material and 
labor many permit holders who had intended erecting camps 
deferred doing so until lumber and erection costs are nearer 
to normal. A permit to erect the buildings necessary for a 
boys' camp near Barretts Pond has been issued to the Young 
Men's Christian Association of Boston, and the association 
contemplates building in the near future. The Appalachian 
Mountain Club also proposes to erect a camp at College Pond 
for its members during the coming spring. In order to make 
the several excellent ponds on the Myles Standish State Forest 
available for the many campers desiring to use them it is 
essential that considerable more road clearing and improvement 
work be done during the coming year. The surveying and 
marking of additional camp sites are now in progress. 

Otter River State Forest. 
Planting work on this reservation began on April 15 and 
continued until June 12. A total of 133,000 four-year-old 
transplants of white, red, and Scotch pine were set in the field 
during the planting season, and twenty-three men were em- 
ployed. The cost per thousand for planting was $11.54. 



44 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Other work during the year has consisted of road and 
boundary clearing and care of the nursery. 

For fire-protective purposes a rough bridge is being built 
over Otter River to replace the one washed out during the 
spring, and the reservation house is to be connected by tele- 
phone. 

Harold Parker State Forest. 

Small lots, totaling 67 acres, were added to this forest 
during 1920. Planting of three-year-old seedlings and four- 
year-old transplants of white and red pine was carried on 
between April 15 and June 12. There were 109,000 plants 
set, and twenty-two men were employed during the season. 
The cost per thousand for planting was $12.81. 

Other work done during the year consisted of opening old 
roads, boundary brushing and surveying, and a small amount 
of thinning. Data have been secured for making a type plan 
of the west parcel of this reservation. 

The small camp on the reservation was improved and made 
more serviceable for use. 

Savoy Mountain State Forest. 
Two hundred acres were added to the Savoy Mountain 
State Forest this year. Owing to the ground conditions pre- 
vailing in the Berkshire region the planting work on this res- 
ervation did not begin until May 5 and continued until June 26. 
There were 139,000 four-year-old transplants, mostly spruce, set 
during the spring season, and an additional 54,000 plants of 
white pine were set out during October. There were 98,000 
two-year spruce seedlings transplanted in a new nursery during 
June, and they will be available for field planting in two years. 
Road, boundary and survey work have constituted the other 
work done on this reserve during the year. Planting costs per 
thousand were $8.62. 

Arthur Warton Swann State Forest. 
During the planting season 30,000 four-year white pine 
transplants were set out on this reservation. Brush burning 
and the hauling of lumber cut during the winter constitute 
other work done on this reserve during the year. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



45 



THE STATE FIRE WARDEN'S REPORT. 

Mr. W. A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with your request, and in accord with 
the provisions of section 2, chapter 722, Acts of 1911, I beg to 
submit the following report of the work accomplished by this 
branch of the Department this year. 

The season of 1920 has been a comparatively favorable one 
from the standpoint of forest fire protection. While we had a 
large number of fires throughout the spring, before vegetation 
started, we were able to hold the loss down to a very low figure. 
The most disastrous fires of the season occurred during the week 
of October 20, at the opening of our hunting season. As no ap- 
preciable amount of rain had fallen throughout eastern Massa- 
chusetts for a period of five weeks, conditions were ideal for 
forest fires. During the first three days of hunting, 165 fires 
were reported, three of which burned over a total of 3,000 
acres, and caused a damage of several thousands of dollars. 
Two of these fires were in the Cape district, and one on the 
North Shore. Unfortunately they were fanned by a 50-mile 
gale, and had assumed considerable size before sufficient help 
had arrived. Conditions were so serious at this time that it 
was deemed advisable to close the hunting season for a period 
of four days, when weather conditions justified reopening the 
season. Fearing that a fire might occur on our Myles Standish 
Reservation during this drought, our State fire truck, fire 
fighting equipment, and men were stationed there and remained 
until all danger was over. 

The fire districts remain the same with the exception of a 
change in the boundary line between districts 4 and 5, making 
the Connecticut River the dividing line, as in former years. 
Mr. F. V. Learoyd, who was connected with this branch of the 
service as district forest warden of district 2 for a period of 
nine months, was promoted to the position of business agent for 
the Department, and Mr. John H. Montle of Fall River was 
appointed to fill the position. Mr. Montle had been a very 
efficient observer at the Fall River observation station for 
several years. 

During the past year the duties of the State Fire Warden 
have been somewhat enlarged by placing the State forests 
under his direct supervision. This change was considered 
expedient because of the fact that at present, and for some time 



46 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 

to come, the principal activities in connection with the develop- 
ing of these forests will be in the nature of fire protection. This 
means the construction of fire lines in some instances, notably 
at the Myles Standish Forest, around the entire reservation, as 
well as such lines as may be necessary to properly safeguard 
the camp sites on the lakes and the protection of the plantations. 
Fire protection on these forests also includes the instalment and 
care of suitable equipment used in fighting fires. Additional 
incentive for making the change, as viewed from an economic 
standpoint, was the fact that, except during the dangerous fire 
season, many of the permanent employees of this branch of the 
service may be used on the development work there without 
extra expense to the Commonwealth. 

As the Boy Scout movement is now attracting much attention, 
it may not be considered untimely to suggest that future work 
on these forests offers an unusual opportunity for their activities, 
where their work would be of undoubted benefit to the State, 
at the same time affording them the enjoyment of outdoor life. 

The slash law which was amended during the last session of 
the Legislature, requiring the clearing of a strip 40 feet around 
all cuttings, and along railroads and highways, as well as the 
clearing of all power and telephone lines, was placed in opera- 
tion July 14, and is working out very satisfactorily. The ad- 
ditional protection assured in the clearing of power and telephone 
lines, thereby creating additional fire protection over the entire 
State, will be of immense value in the control of forest fires. 
The authority given to the employees of this Department in 
the enforcement of this law will certainly be a great help to 
town forest wardens in carrying out the provisions of this act. 
A decided improvement has already been shown in many 
localities. - 

The usual amount of construction work has been done through- 
out the season. A new tower 48 feet high was erected at the 
summit of Provens Mountain on lands of the Springfield water 
works in the town of Agawam. While this station is within a 
few miles of the Connecticut line, it was the only location that 
would cover certain dangerous fire areas in the county of 
Hampden. The 50-foot tower located at Hanson was removed to 
Pelham and replaced the old 30-foot wooden tower that had 
been in use there several years. This gives the Pelham station 
an additional 20 feet in height, thus greatly increasing the 
effectiveness of the station. A new 78-foot tower with stairs 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



47 



was erected at Hanson, replacing the small tower, which had 
outlived its usefulness, owing to the timber growth in this 
vicinity obstructing the view and necessitating an addition to 
the height of the tower of 28 feet. This gives us an ideal station 
which covers an increased amount of forested area. 

It seems advisable that an observation station be located at 
the summit of Oak Hill in the town of Harvard. The territory 
in this vicinity for a radius of 8 or 10 miles has been covered 
to some extent by distant observation towers, although we have 
not been able to give it adequate protection because of the fact 
that the distance renders it difficult for these stations to detect 
fires when in an incipient stage. I feel quite confident that 
several towns receiving benefit from this station will co-operate 
with us and raise sufficient funds to meet the initial cost of the 
tower, and possibly of its erection. 

There is also some agitation relative to the necessity of a 
station at the summit of Mount Toby, in the town of Sunder- 
land. This mountain and considerable area around it is owned 
by the State and used by the Amherst Agricultural College for 
demonstration purposes. The Division of Fisheries and Game 
also have holdings in the town of Montague that would receive 
protection. These State properties, together with the vast 
amount of forested area in that locality, would seem to warrant 
the establishment of a station at this point. The funds for the 
purchase of a tower would be furnished by Amherst College and 
the surrounding towns benefiting by the tower. 

We are pleased to note the increased interest throughout the 
entire State in the purchase of forest fire fighting equipment. 
A large number of extinguishers, pumps and other forest fire 
fighting equipment has been purchased by many of the smaller 
towns, and a great many towns have provided themselves with 
motor apparatus for getting men and equipment to fires quickly. 
We have now about 100 towns with motor-drawn apparatus. 

Forest fire conferences were held during the month of March 
in Middleborough, Boston and Worcester. These meetings were 
fairly well attended by forest wardens, deputy forest wardens 
and selectmen, and much interest was shown in the following 
discussions: the importance of fire prevention; the effect of 
forest fires on game life; railroad fire prevention; benefits 
derived from Boy Scouts; and fire fighting equipment and 
methods -of using. On account of the heavy snow fall and con- 
ditions of the roads, it seemed advisable not to continue the 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 

s; 



[Jan. 



conferences throughout the western part of the State. I feel 
that these conferences are very important, and arrangements 
should be made to hold a greater number of them this coming 
season, so as to give an opportunity for attendance to every 
warden in the State. I cannot urge too strongly upon wardens 
their duty to attend these meetings. 

In connection with our efforts to educate the public with 
respect to the danger of fires and the loss relative to them, we 
have distributed 6,000 cloth signs which have been posted in 
conspicuous places along roadsides, rivers and trails, and in 
public places such as post offices, railroad stations, etc. We 
have also erected on or near lands where very serious fires have 
occurred wooden signs, size 6 by 8 feet. The wording on these 
signs is significant. (See illustration.) 

CARELESSNESS 
CAUSED THIS FIRE 



BE CAREFUL 
WITH MATCHES, CIGARETTES, 
CIGARS and PIPES 



Wm. A. L. Bazeley, 
Commissioner of Conservation. 

These signs have attracted much attention and favorable 
comment. Based upon investigation, I am prompted to recom- 
mend for future use metal rather than cloth signs, such as are 
in use in several other States, which because of their superior 
qualities are deemed much more economical. 

An analysis of the railroad fire problem reveals that while at 
a first glance the number of fires occurring from this source is 
greater than it should be, yet, considering the fact that from 
1,400 to 1,500 locomotives are traversing the railroad lines of 
the State daily, the number of fires caused by them is not in 
excess of what can be reasonably expected. During the active 
fire season five inspectors from this Department were con- 
stantly engaged making examinations of the front ends and 
ash pans of locomotives, and, with the exception of a few in- 
stances, their equipment was found to be in fairly good con- 
dition. Naturally, our efforts in this direction have been con- 
fined to the locomotives operating wholly within the State, as 




Warning notice posted on burned-over land. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



49 



we have no control over those coming into Massachusetts from 
other States, where an inspection is not required. In this 
connection, however, I would state that through the efforts of 
Mr. Henry W. Seward, acting for the Department of Public 
Utilities, arrangements were made whereby only those locomo- 
tives known to be in perfect condition were allowed to operate 
in Massachusetts. Credit should be given also to Mr. Seward 
and his two assistants for their promptness in causing all loco- 
motives reported as setting fires to be inspected and put in 
proper condition. Our records show that we have had 614 
railroad fires: Boston & Albany, 114; Boston & Maine, 74; 
Central Vermont, 9; New York, New Haven & Hartford, 417. 
These fires burned over an area of 3,271 acres, causing a damage 
of $10,474, and costing $5,764 to extinguish. 

It has been apparent for several years that the percentage of 
fires from unknown causes has been abnormally high. I am 
convinced that the secret in a large part lies in the careless use 
of smoking materials. For several years past our reports have 
placed much emphasis upon the need of educating smokers 
with regard to the vital importance of using caution in this 
respect. The rapid increase in the use of automobiles has been 
attended by a marked increase in the number of fires, the 
origin of which has been traced in most instances to the dis- 
carded cigar or cigarette thoughtlessly cast upon the roadside 
by the automobilist. We hope that constant agitation of this 
question will serve to reduce the number of these fires in the 
near future. 

In closing, reference should be made to the continued co- 
operation with the Federal Department under the Weeks Law, 
which has been of such distinct advantage to us in the past. We 
view with favor the effort which is being made by the United 
States Forest Service to secure a greatly increased appropri- 
ation for future work of this character, which would undoubt- 
edly result in a corresponding increase in the aid which we are 
receiving from this source. A tentative program has already 
been proposed based upon this probable increase of the govern- 
ment appropriation, which would provide for three additional 
district forest wardens, three forest fire trucks, and enable us 
to join with the towns in giving to forest wardens reasonable 
compensation for their services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. C. Hutchins, 
State Fire Warden. 



50 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Comparative Damages by Forest Fires for the Past Eleven Years. 



Year. 


Number 
of Fires 


Acreage 
burned. 


Cost 
to extin- 
guish. 


Damage. 


Average 
Acreage 
per Fire. 


Average 
Damage 
per Fire. 


1910, . 




1,385 


42,221 


$23,475 


$205,383 


30.46 


$148 20 


1911, . 




2,356 


99,693 


47,093 


537,749 


39.31 


226 24 


1912, . 




1,851 


22,072 


20,219 


80,834 


11.92 


43 67 


1913, . 




2,688 


53,826 


35,456 


178,357 


20.02 


66 35 


1914, . 




3,181 


38,975 


48,750 


95,389 


12.25 


29 98 


1915, . 




3,008 


48,389 


36,783 


141,073 


16.08 


46 90 


1916, . 




1,425 


16,198 


8,593 


44,765 


13.22 


36 54 


1917, . 




2,175 


20,020 


18,033 


41,109 


9.21 


18 90 


1918, . 




2,553 


37,638 


28,043 


205,627 


14.74 


80 05 


1919, . 




1,566 


22,045 


17,388 


49,069 


14.07 


31 32 


1920, . 




1,619 


14,517 


27,839 


62,241 


8.96 


38 44 



Types of Classified Damages. 





1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


1920. 


Standing trees, 


$18,786 


$24,705 


$71,706 


$16,595 


$37,532 


Logs, lumber, cordwood, . 


4,545 


4,680 


37,815 


7,516 


7,371 




10,823 


6,893 


46,025 


12,508 


11,950 


Bridges, fences 


1,638 


687 


1,742 


902 


285 


Not classified, 


8,973 


4,144 


48,339 


11,548 


5,103 


Totals, '. 


$44,765 


$41,109 


$205,627 


$49,069 


$62,241 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



51 




52 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Types of Land burned over (Acres). 





1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


1920. 


Timber 


1,435 


1,237 


2,520 


1,659 


1,077 




/ 00 


9 071 


o,oyo 




1,351 


Second growth, not merchantable, . 


1,970 


4,137 


6,069 


2,893 


2,224 




9,990 


7,126 


10,549 


11,122 


7,119 


Grass land, 


1,573 


3,814 


4,669 


3,671 


2,119 




475 


1,432 


8,135 


198 


627 


Totals 


16,198 


20,020 


37,638 


22,045 


14,517 



Forest Fires of 1920. 



Months. 


Number. 


Acres. 


Cost to 
extinguish. 


Damage. 




1919. 










December, . 




20 


50 


$62 00 


$230 00 




1920. 










January, 




9 


53 


73 00 


1,500 00 


February, . 












March, 




135 


739 


909 00 


1,225 00 


April, . 




671 


5,738 


4,959 00 


19,049 00 


May, . 




347 


2,769 


4,945 00 


10,139 00 


June, . 




66 


798 


990 00 


1,098 00 


July, . 




72 


889 


2,323 00 


2,005 00 


August, 




40 


223 


1,319 00 


892 00 


September, 




22 


94 


205 00 


2,187 00 


October, 




175 


2,994 


11,497 00 


20,571 00 


November, . 




62 


170 


557 00 


3,345 00 


Totals, . 




1,619 


14,517 


$27,839 00 


$62,241 00 



Towns receiving Fire -equipment Reimbursement during 1920. 



Ashburnham, 


. $76 98 


MiUville, . 


$8 


Ashland, 


111 50 


New Marlborough, 


7 


Avon, 


17 70 


Northfield, . 


. 232 


Bellingham, 


13 20 


Pelham, 


9 


Bolton, 


6 25 


Prescott, 


96 


Boxford, 


10 00 


Raynham, . 


22 


Cummington, 


67 50 


Sherborn, . 


48 


Dennis, 


90 25 


Stow, .... 


6 


Erving, 


96 00 






Mashpee, . 


16 25 


Total, . 


. $979 


Middleton, 


43 13 







1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



53 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF GYPSY-MOTH 

WORK. 

William A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — Pursuant to your request, I have the honor to submit 
for your information a brief report of the operations carried on 
against the gypsy and brown-tail moths for the fiscal year 
ending Nov. 30, 1920. As former annual reports and publica- 
tions of this branch of the service have treated in detail of the 
history of the introduction of these pests into Massachusetts, 
their life history, and habits, I do not consider it necessary to 
amplify on these topics here. The manner of conducting our 
operations during the past year has not differed materially from 
that of former years. It has been our aim to employ only 
those methods which previous experience has shown to be 
most effective in reducing the insects, keeping in mind at all 
times the necessity of practicing wise economy. Year by year 
the importance of this work seems to have become more fully 
appreciated by the people at large, and I am happy to express 
the conviction that at no time during my twenty-five years' 
service in connection with this undertaking has there existed a 
more cordial spirit of co-operation on their part than has been 
evidenced throughout the year just closed. 



General Conditions. 
I regret to repor.t that, broadly speaking, the condition in 
the infested area of the State does not show the improvement 
that was hoped for. Gypsy moths have been slightly more 
abundant during the past season, and it is difficult for us to 
determine the cause of the increase. A rather puzzling phase 
of the situation is the fact that notwithstanding this increase 
in the number of caterpillars the amount of defoliation was 
much less than in previous years. Entomologists have advanced 
certain theories to account for this unusual condition, some of 
them contending that the frequent rains during the early part 
of the summer served to check the larva? from feeding. It was 
also noted that the wilt disease, which in past years has been a 
very potent factor in killing off the caterpillars, this year failed 
to develop to any extent, presumably owing to climatic con- 
ditions. And finally, a partial solution of the problem may be 
found because of the failure since 1917 of the parasites to 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



operate to the best advantage, as shown in the report of Mr. 
A. F. Burgess, who is in charge of operations carried on against 
the gypsy moth by the United States Department of Agriculture, 
and whose report will be found on another page. 

Spraying Apparatus. 
The writer is pleased to state that as the importance of the 
moth work has become increasingly clear, most of the towns 
infested, responding to the recommendation of this Department, 
have become well equipped with modern spraying apparatus 
which will insure adequate protection to their shade trees, as 
well as enable them to give reasonable aid to the smaller property 
owners. Owners of many of the larger estates, emulating the 
example of the town, have purchased spraying equipment, and 
are now caring for their own property. The writer cannot urge 
too emphatically the wisdom of all who can do so adopting this 
policy. 

Brown-tail Moths. 
Reference was made in our report of 1919 to the reappearance 
of the brown-tail moth in several sections of the State. An 
apprehension was expressed of the danger of another serious 
outbreak of this damaging insect, and careful attention was 
given those towns where infestations occurred, and the most 
painstaking care used to destroy all nests. Instructions were 
sent to all our local moth superintendents to be extremely 
vigilant, and to use prompt measures to eradicate this pest 
whenever found. In most of the towns # where infestations 
were discovered last year action resulted in a marked decrease. 
There were several instances, however, where private owners 
were notified of infestations on their property and instructed to 
fulfill the requirements of the law by removing them, which 
they promised to do. Subsequent investigation disclosed that 
they failed to act at the proper time, thus leaving a few colonies, 
which it is our purpose to clean up the coming season. Strict 
search was made for the so-called brown-tail fungous disease 
which heretofore has been very effective in the destruction of 
this insect, but in only one of the colonies was its presence dis- 
covered. I am convinced that with proper co-operation on the 
part of property owners a serious outbreak of this pest may be 
prevented, thus sparing the citizens of the Commonwealth a 
recurrence of the inconvenience and suffering to which 'they 
were subjected by this poisonous caterpillar a few years ago. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



55 



Cranberry Bog Work. 
There has been no abatement of our efforts to protect the 
great Cape Cod cranberry industry against serious injury by the 
gypsy moth. The success which crowned our earlier efforts in 
this direction seems to have resulted in greater interest and re- 
newed activity on the part of all concerned in this vitally im- 
portant undertaking. Through the instrumentality of Mr. Wal- 
ter F. Holmes, our Division superintendent in charge of that 
territory, several meetings were held during the summer for the 
purpose of instructing bog owners, local moth superintendents, 
and others with regard to the most effective methods of control. 
Present at some of these meetings was Dr. Franklin of the State 
experimental bog, who has devoted much time and study to the 
determination of the most effective and economical methods to 
apply in safeguarding cranberry bogs from insect depredations. 
In each instance his discussion of the subject was listened to 
with great interest, and was of undoubted profit to those privi- 
leged to enjoy it. Reports received from cranberry growers 
throughout that district were extremely encouraging, and cer- 
tainly indicate that the protective measures applied in the past 
were fully justified by the improved conditions existing at the 
present time. 

The Satin Moth. 
Early in June the entomological world was somewhat startled 
by the discovery of a new insect pest in Massachusetts. This 
insect is known as Stilpnotia salicis, or the satin moth of Europe, 
a name undoubtedly given it because the moths are pure white 
and the wings have a satin-like luster. The discovery of this 
insect was made by Mr. A. N. Habberley, superintendent of the 
Middlesex Fells Reservation, near the boundary line between 
the cities of Maiden and Medford. Specimens of the cater- 
pillars were sent to the Gypsy Moth Laboratory at Melrose 
Highlands for identification, and proved to be the European 
species above mentioned. The fullgrown caterpillars are about 
one and one-half inches in length and of a yellowish color, with 
prominent white blotches on each segment of the back. They 
are very conspicuous on account of the colors, and are quite 
different from any caterpillars that are found in this region. 
European writings indicate that this species attacks poplar, wil- 
low, oak, and other trees, and occurs in many of the countries 



56 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



of northern and southern Europe and eastern Asia. Investigation 
shows that in the infestation found here the poplar tree seems 
to be the favored food, although willows and other species have 
been attacked by the insect to some extent. There is danger, 
however, that if it should once become firmly established it 
might prove a menace to other valuable shade or forest trees. 

The imperative need of the extermination of this pest was 
recognized, and co-operative efforts were carried on by the 
State Forester's office and the Metropolitan Park Commission 
to that end. Their efforts were directed mainly to the destruc- 
tion of as many caterpillars and pupae as possible, so as to 
prevent the spread of the moths into other territory. The 
United States Bureau of Entomology conducted scouting opera- 
tions throughout the season for the purpose of determining the 
extent of the infestation. At the time of writing this report 
the presence of the moth had been noted in sixty cities and 
towns, its spread having extended over the line into New 
Hampshire. 

Lynn Woods. 

A striking example of what may be accomplished in pro- 
tecting our woodlands from the ravages of the gypsy moth is 
found in the Lynn woods. This territory, comprising 2,200 
acres, set aside some years ago as a public park, was at one 
time so heavily infested with moths as to necessitate its being 
closed to the public. As a result of judicious thinning, under- 
ground planting of pines, and annual spraying, supplemented 
by the usual methods of creosoting egg clusters, this park has 
been restored to a nearly normal condition. 

Lumber Operations and Roadside Brush Cutting. 
The discontinuance of the lumbering operations that have 
been practiced during the past few years as an aid to gypsy- 
moth suppression, the cost of supervision being paid from the 
gypsy-moth appropriation, enabled us to increase slightly our 
financial assistance to towns. This was also true with respect 
to the elimination of brush cutting along the roadsides. It is 
the opinion of the writer, however, that roadside work of this 
nature should be carried on in the future by towns under a 
special appropriation made for the purpose. A number of towns 
have already inaugurated that policy. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



57 



State Highway Work. 
The spraying of the State highways has been done as usual 
under the direction of this office by the local organizations in 
the towns, or the traveling sprayers owned by the State, and 
creosoting also was done where it was recommended by our 
Division superintendents. The work was done in 131 munic- 
ipalities at a total cost of $13,000. 

Federal Gypsy-Moth "Work in Massachusetts. 
The Federal work of preventing the spread of the gypsy 
moth, conducted by the United States Bureau of Entomology 
under the direction of Dr. L. O. Howard, has been continued 
during the past year, and a brief statement covering some of 
the important activities in Massachusetts has been prepared by 
Mr. A. F. Burgess, who has charge of this work for the Bureau. 
His report follows: — 

During the winter and early spring of 1920, scouting of the border 
towns west of Worcester was continued by the Bureau, and later in the 
spring spraying operations were carried on in several towns where heavy 
colonies existed, and from which long-distance spread of the insect might 
occur in co-operation with the State forces. Only a limited amount of 
work has been done this fall on account of the small amount of funds 
available, but eight towns have already been found infested outside the 
area that was under quarantine last year. Federal field work has now 
been discontinued in this State on account of lack of funds, but if emer- 
gency money is quickly made available, the usual number of towns out- 
side and adjoining the infested area will be examined before spring. 

Quarantine work has been carried on as usual, all shipments of ma- 
terials or products likely to carry gypsy -moth infestation having been 
inspected and certified before shipment is made. This work not only 
protects the uninfested portion of Massachusetts from this insect, but 
many other parts of the country that depend on eastern Massachusetts 
for supplies of lumber products, nursery stock and stone. 

The colonization of parasites and natural enemies of the gypsy moth 
has been continued throughout the year, but owing to the fact that 
some of these beneficial insects have now become established over most of 
the infested area, a much smaller number of colonies have been liberated 
than heretofore. The work of checking up the success of colonies liber- 
ated, and the amount of parasitism that has resulted from them, has been 
curtailed somewhat by a combination of decrease in the amount of funds 
available for this work, and increase in the expense of doing it. Enough 
information has been secured, however, to draw some general conclusions 
as to the present status of the parasite situation. 



58 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



As a result of the extremely severe winters of 1917-18 and 1919-20, 
many gypsy-moth egg clusters in exposed situations failed to hatch. 
This resulted in fewer caterpillars being present in the summer of 1918 
and 1920 than had been anticipated, and collections made during the 
periods mentioned indicate that the imported parasites, particularly those 
that attack the eggs of the gypsy moth, suffered severe reduction in 
numbers. 

Anastatus bifasciatus, one of the egg-attacking species, which has only 
a single brood, was reduced considerably in numbers, but present informa- 
tion indicates that it is far more abundant and widely distributed through- 
out the infested region than Schedius kuranoB, another species that attacks 
gypsy-moth eggs. 

The latter has been found this fall in the Cape Cod district in rather 
small numbers, and the result of its work during the past two or three 
years has been negligible in most localities on account of its inability to 
survive during extremely cold winter weather. The parasites which 
attack the caterpillars and several different species, each with different 
habit and mode of life, have suffered considerably from the same cause, 
but none have been as severely affected as Schedius. 

In the summer of 1920 Apanteles melanoscelus was found more widely 
distributed in Massachusetts than ever before, and in a few localities 
rather heavy parasitism of the caterpillars was noted. 

Compsilura concinnata, one of the Tachinid flies which attacks the 
gypsy-moth caterpillars, also destroys many native injurious species. It 
has now spread throughout the infested area, and a good percentage of 
parasitism resulted in many of the infested towns. 

Blepharipa scutellata, a parasite of the large gypsy-moth caterpillars, 
has spread very rapidly during the last few years, and some collections 
have shown a very favorable degree of parasitism. 

Conditions have been such, however, since 1917, that parasites have 
not operated to the best advantage. While the cold winters mentioned 
served to decrease the number of gypsy-moth egg clusters that hatched, 
they also resulted in a marked decrease in the overwintering parasites. 
The rate of multiplication of the gypsy moth is considerably greater than 
that of the parasites; hence they were not as effective this summer as 
might be desired. Another complication which makes the situation more 
difficult is that in order to bring about a reasonable amount of gypsy- 
moth control by action of the parasites that have already become estab- 
lished, it is necessary that most of the species occur in abundance and 
work effectively in the same locality. This does not always occur, and 
while egg parasites may be abundant, if their work is not supplemented 
by other species that attack the larvae, it is possible for a considerable 
increase in gypsy-moth infestation to result. 

The Calosoma beetle was not affected severely by the cold winters, 
and many reports were received as to its great abundance in certain 
localities during the past summer. While this species is able to survive in 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 59 

areas where gypsy-moth infestation is light, as a rule it is more conspicu- 
ous and destructive to the gypsy moth in badly infested localities. 

Brown-tail moth infestation was slightly more noticeable in 1920 than 
for several years prior to that time, and a number of moths were observed 
at arc lights in Melrose during July. The species has not been noted at 
lights for several years. The parasites of the brown-tail moth were less 
abundant than heretofore, which is doubtless partly due to the scarcity 
of the host. 

Many lines of experimental work are under way looking toward the. 
discovery of better and more effective methods of moth control. A 
co-operative project with the State of Massachusetts is being carried on in 
a few towns to determine the possibility of using a minimum amount of 
labor and hand methods, and securing the maximum amount of benefit 
from the parasites that are already in the field. 

Special North Shore Work. 
Previous reports have described in detail the gypsy-moth 
operations which have been conducted since 1908 in our efforts 
to preserve the beauty of the woods along the North Shore. 
This work has been carried on under a co-operative agreement 
whereby one-third of the expense is borne by the Common- 
wealth, one-third by the town of Manchester and the city of 
Beverly, and the remaining third provided by the North Shore 
residents. 

The splendid condition of the forest and shade trees resulting 
from the protection given them is extremely gratifying, and 
fully justifies the expenditures. During the past season so 
excellent was the condition of the woodlands and roadsides 
that only a comparatively small portion of the tract was creo- 
soted or sprayed. 

The following figures will give some idea of the exact con- 
dition of the North Shore in general : — 



Acres creosoted, 999 

Acres sprayed, 694 

Miles of roadside creosoted, 27 

Miles of roadside sprayed, 18 



Twelve miles of roadsides were so free from infestation of any 
kind that no w T ork was necessary on them. 

The financial statement following shows the present con- 
dition of the North Shore fund. 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 1921. 



Special North Shore Fund. 
Financial Statement. 



Receipts. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1919, $3,399 16 

State Forester, credit on supplies, . . . 223 40 
Wm. D. Sohier, agent, for work on private 

estates, 1,845 48 

Wm. D. Sohier, agent, collections, . . . 5,000 00 

State Forester, 5,000 00 

Town of Manchester, 2,500 00 

City of Beverly, 2,500 00 

Massachusetts Highway Commission, for work 

on State highways, 201 87 

State Forester, for labor on State sprayers, . 2,442 19 
State Forester, for lead furnished towns and 

materials on sprayers, 2,614 46 

$25,726 56 

Expenditures. 

Payroll, $5,281 67 

Travel, . 121 37 

Supplies, 886 29 

Teaming, etc., 921 04 

Rent, 300 00 

Sundries, 6 93 

7,517 30 



Balance Nov. 30, 1920, $18,209 26 



Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Smith, 
Superintendent of Moth Work. 



APPENDIX 



APPENDIX. 



Financial Statement. 

Expenditures. 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), salary 

of commissioner, 85,000 00 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), per- 
sonal services 8,300 00 

Appropriation (c. 629, Acts of 1920), per- 
sonal services, 250 00 

$13,550 00 

Expenditures, 13,542 04 $13,542 04 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), office 

incidentals, $7,550 00 

Appropriation (c. 629, Acts of 1920), office 

incidentals 300 00 

Refunds, 2 50 

7,852 50 

Expenditures, 6,973 42 6,973 42 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), general forestry 

and nurseries, . . . 25,500 00 

Expenditures, 25,479 18 25,479 18 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), purchase and plant- 
ing of forest lands, . 10,000 00 

Expenditures, 9,535 26 9,535 26 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), prevention of 

forest fires, 45,500 00 

Expenditures 45,000 08 45,000 08 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), protection against 

forest fires 1,500 00 

Expenditures, 979 60 979 60 

Balance from 1919, $73,679 10 

Appropriation (c. 225, Acts of 1920), sup- 
pression of gypsy and brown-tail moths, 210,000 00 

Refunds and transfers, .... 1,596 28 

285,275 38 

Expenditures, 238,219 02 238,219 02- 

Total expenditures for 1920 $339,728 60 

Receipts. 

For cordwood sold, $191 69 

For trees sold 3,285 46 

For forest examinations, 70 81 

For sale of land, 615 21 

For refund, i 2 12 

For camp sites, 371 00 

For rent, hay, pasturage, etc., 913 64 

For lumber, etc. (Swann Forest), 8,107 00 

For supplies and gypsy-moth work, 40,073 29 

For supplies for fire fighting, 1,616 97 

For fire tower, 300 00 



Total for year, 



$55,547 19 



64 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1920. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
i\et 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Abingtoii, • • 


$1,531 57 


_ 


_ 

/ $733 431 
\ 103 00 


1 
/ 




_ 


_ 


$1,697 74 


Acton, . . • 


860 43 


$1,232 25 


$371 82 


$1,321 62 


$1,693 44 


965 67 


Acushnet, . . 


707 91 


_ 








- 


- 


1 035 fifi 


Amesbury, . • 


3,011 05 


_ 


- 






_ 


_ 


4,077 56 


Amherst, . • 


2,782 87 


_ 


- 






_ 


_ 


2,872 32 


Andover, . . 


3,394 96 


_ 


_ 






_ 


_ 


4,036 03 


Arlington, 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 






_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Ashburnham, 


537 91 


765 46 


160 50 




227 55 


364 08 


591 63 


584 69 


Ashby, 


296 00 


666 90 


425 78i 




250 00 


698 91 


948 91 


304 74 


Asbland, • • 


689 50 


812 17 


/ 121 172 
1 81 50 


) 


122 67 


972 37 


1,095 04 


835 00 


Atnoi, 


3,288 07 










- 


- 


3,476 53 


Attleboro, 


5,000 00 


_ 








- 


- 


5,000 00 


Auburn, . . 


865 35 


239 20 


80 80 






_ 


_ 


968 96 




524 31 


511 50 


64 25 






108 40 


95 59 


558 54 


Ayer, 


1,246 85 


1,163 77 


210 60 






406 42 


323 34 


1,222 13 


Barnstable, . . 


3,693 79 


_ 


_ 






_ 


_ 


4,072 83 




1,255 62 


_ 


_ 






_ 


_ 


1 248 91 


"RorlfnrH 


828 68 


950 18 


/ 656 821 
1 i f 327 94 


\ 
J 


121 50 


1,094 13 


1,215 63 


915 33 


Belchertown, . . 


455 84 


_ 








_ 


_ 


471 59 


Bellingbam, . . 


512 92 


_ 


_ 






_ 


_ 


610 91 


Belmont, 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 




- 


_ 




5 ooo oo 


Berkley, 


271 22 


273 67 


5105 




2 45 


266 72 


269 17 


294 29 


Berlin, . . 


268 12 


610 93 


/ 137 28 1 

1 385 fiQ 


} 


342 81 


649 05 


991 86 


347 04 


x>evcny, • • 


5,000 00 


- 








- 




5 000 00 


Billerica, . ■ 


2,565 47 














2 746 18 


Blackstone, . 


828 87 














850 99 


Bolton, . 


331 89 


555 95 


670 47 




224 06 


1,501 38 


1,725 44 


336 91 


Boston, . 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Bourne, . 


2,455 92 


2,507 98 


2,599 81 






527 362 


271 89 


2,500 30 


Boxborough, . 


129 24 


85 54 


/ 122 851 
I 7 50 


} 




1,197 46 


1,153 76 


140 66 


Boxford, 


38190 


684 07 


395 09 




302 17 


1,143 76 


1,445 93 


397 64 


Boylston, 


236 22 


712 35 


534 29 




476 13 


538 85 


1,014 98 


259 72 



i Lead sold. 



1 Includes sprayer. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



65 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Continued. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities and 


Re- 
q Hired 
Expend- 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 












iture. 


Braintree, 


$4,084 64 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$4,445 23 


Brewster, 


324 09 


$746 76 


/ $69 321 
\ 439 28 


} $172 67 


$1,313 ll 2 


$1,235 78 


447 65 


Bridgewater, . 


1,879 28 


2,303 35 


1,846 94 


- 


2,884 98 2 


2,459 98 


1,901 56 


Brim field, 


341 34 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


380 99 


Brockton, 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Brookfield, . 


681 99 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


707 44 


Brookline, 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Burlington, 


459 98 


674 90 


292 47 


214 92 


643 69 


858 61 


569 64 


Cambridge, 


5,000 00 


- 




- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Canton, . 


2,437 22 


- 


- 


- 


102 16 


102 16 


2,750 11 


Carlisle, . 


205 85 


1,724 81 


/ 57 951 
I 829 68 


} 1,518 96 


564 84 


2,083 80 


233 55 


Carver, . 


820 35 


1,687 71 


f 180 181 
\ 3,406 59 


J 867 36 


2,585 44 


3,452 80 


849 99 


Charlton, 


630 43 


- 




- 


- 


- 


655 97 


Chatham, 


1,000 92 


1,227 69 


95 50 


1 77 


1,066 47 = 


843 24 


1,118 99 


Chelmsford, . 


2,072 91 


1,201 03 


1,687 18 


- 


1,619 59 


747 71 


2,568 82 


Chelsea, 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Chilmark, 


174 73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


183 25 


Clinton, 


4,032 14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,712 00 


Cohasset, 


2,619 11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,674 26 


Concord, 


2,832 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,936 04 


Dana, 


205 95 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


214 84 


Dan vers, 


3,301 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,480 12 


Dartmouth, . 


2,463 10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,959 79 


Dedham, 


0,000 00 












5,000 00 


Deerfield, 


1,698 97 












1,715 62 


Dennis, . 


569 44 


619 31 


226 70 




1,366 48 2 


916 35 


606 97 


Dighton, 


1,031 64 












1,189 45 


Douglas, 


587 55 












662 69 


Dover, . 


1,081 83 


1,733 06 


1,492 31 


651 23 


2,115 81 


2,767 04 


1,120 29 


Dracut, . 


1,193 56 


1,711 57 


1,199 25 


518 01 


1,715 12 


2,233 13 


1,326 47 


Dudley, 


1,133 61 












1,259 20 


Dunstable, 


163 56 


623 65 


395 55 


460 09 


719 71 


1,179 80 


174 19 



i Lead sold. 



3 Includes sprayer. 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Continued. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


xte- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
WorK. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture . 


Duxbury, 


$1,366 25 


$1,589 42 


$2,575 80 


$223 17 


$1,477 96 


$1,701 13 


$1,693 03 


East Bridgewater, . 


1,368 20 


1,407 54 


612 92 




2,028 742 


1,818 08 


1,445 79 


East ham, 


214 90 


554 26 


78 50 


114 36 


911 57 2 


800 93 


236 52 


Easthampton, 


4,319 67 












5,000 00 


Easton, . 


1,699 57 


1,726 01 


537 06 


26 44 


1,938 37 


1,964 81 


1,799 03 


Edgartown, . 


702 98 












718 81 


Essex, 


533 08 


637 55 


726 00 


104 47 


258 39 


362 86 


548 41 


Everett, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Fair haven, 


2,713 65 












3,145 65 


Fall River, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Falmouth, 


2,948 28 


3,845 67 


1,006 90 




3,162 822 


2,568 17 


3,086 10 


Fitchburg, 


5,000 00 










~ 


5,000 00 


Foxborough, . 


1,233 88 


1,703 74 


266 12 


469 86 


256 04 


725 90 


1,265 29 


Framingham, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Franklin, 


2,315 95 


495 50 






4 80 




2,586 19 


Freetown, 


549 13 












554 96 


Gardner, 


4,766 87 


— 






ft** 'i 




5,000 00 


Georgetown, . 


564 09 


1,253 95 


/ 22 09 1 
1 1,082 28 


J 653 06 


1,096 20 


1,749 26 


599 16 


Gill, 


262 39 












285 04 


Gloucester, 


5,000 00 




— 




— 




5,000 00 


Grafton, 


1,423 79 


1,017 17 


87 50 






— 


1,519 98 


Great Barrington, . 


3,126 96 


— 






- 


~ 


3,269 40 


Greenfield, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Groton, . 


1,177 11 


2,148 74 


/ 436 28 1 
{ 1,070 40 


} 778 25 


1,050 98 


1,829 23 


1,278 48 


Groveland, 


634 83 


792 89 


835 95 


158 06 


371 08 


529 14 


645 72 


Halifax, . 


325 42 


1,075 06 


/ 77 191 
1 780 48 


} 499 64 


1,432 89 2 


1,682 53 


376 46 


Hamilton, 


1,608 59 


2,566 30 


1,566 51 




341 26 


34126 


1,701 12 


Hanover, 


830 19 


1,946 63 


1,238 51 


1,116 44 


2,300 88 


3,417 32 


934 29 


Hanson, 


805 56 


801 90 


/ 84 221 
\ 703 37 






724 76 


721 10 


83411 


Harvard, 


648 24 


632 96 


/ l,184 93i 
1 153 64 






1,911 73 


1,896 45 


82133 


Harwich, 


797 64 


1,923 48 


J 41311 
1 412 70 




1,125 84 


1,167 57 


2,293 41 


874 76 


Haverhill, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 



i Lead sold. 



2 Includes sprayer. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 67 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Continued. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities wd 
Towns. 


' Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Hingham, 


$2,895 96 












$3,568 59 


Holbrook, 


793 69 


$828 64 


$477 00 




$1,162 89 


$1,162 89 


854 03 


Holden, . 


1,010 27 


1,293 04 


717 99 


$282 77 


520 98 


803 75 


1,020 30 


Holliston, 


855 52 


1,522 13 


f 234 49 1 
\ 774 80 


} 666 61 


614 25 


1,280 86 


1,031 15 


Hopedale, 


1,713 95 












1,359 06 


Hopkinton, . 


778 62 


1,393 23 


239 56 


364 61 


990 55 = 


1,105 16 


839 89 


Hubbardston, 


352 53 












354 30 


Hudson, 


2,084 97 








6 35 




2,330 98 


Hull, . 


4,403 74 












5,000 00 


Ipswich, 


2,382 06 


2,150 60 


1,610 32 




4 47 




2,422 77 


Kingston, 


674 82 


1,164 24 


/ 61891 
\ 592 75 


} 200 00 


1,048 14 


1,248 14 


748 79 


Lakeville, 


497 27 


386 75 


f 105 031 
\ 519 10 


\ - 

J 


1,177 90 


1,067 18 


514 37 


Lancaster, 


995 43 












1,033 70 


Lawrence, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Leicester, 


1,091 39 












1,131 73 


Lenox, . 


2,953 58 












2,951 37 


Leominster, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Lexington, 


3,586 70 












3,984 16 


Leyden, . 


110 27 












114 00 


Lincoln, . 


767 42 


1,790 24 


1,552 76 




1,986 21 


1,986 21 


802 43 


Littleton, 


560 69 


362 20 


/ 636 001 
\ 88 75 


1 


1,066 63 


868 14 


653 39 


Lowell, . 


5 oon on 












5,000 00 


Lunenburg, . 


710 59 


686 62 


"/ 363 33' 
\ 1,429 57 


} - 


1,281 22 


1,257 25 


746 25 


Lynn, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Lynnfield 


688 55 


1,854 15 


615 85 


1,165 60 


1.396 97 


2,562 57 


7Q1 71 


Maiden, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Manchester, . 


4,502 21 












4,622 88 


Mansfield, 


2,348 21 












2,538 48 


Marblehead, . 


4,658 24 












4,753 19 


Marion, . 


1,316 29 


1,722 53 


1,002 75 




2,891 752 


2,547 99 


1,334 63 


Marlborough, 


4,775 32 












5,000 00 


Marshfield, . 


1,103 27 


1,086 67 


f 207 94 1 
1 2,646 27 


} 


1.660 94 


1,644 34 


1,210 29 



i Lead sold. 



2 Includes sprayer. 



68 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Continued. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


xve- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 

Amount 

received 
* 

trom 
State. 


Ke- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Mashpee, 


$192 51 


SI 77Q 5Q 


$441 49 


11 587 08 


$1,067 44 


4"' Ko-l 19 

-.-.''■> t o ~. 




$200 58 


Mattapoisett, 


768 47 












857 31 


Maynard, 


1,928 70 












2,081 30 


Medfield, 


861 32 


S81 30 


f 33 02' 
\ 591 70 


| 135 38 


1,151 04 


1,286 42 


883 76 


Medford, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Medway, 


812 91 












963 06 


Melrose, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Men don, 


309 91 












325 14 


Merrimae, 


662 98 


1,567 24 


281 21 


904 26 


298 82 


1 ''OS 08 


693 48 


Methuen,. 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Middleborough, 


2,104 62 


2,997 73 


/ 165 12» 
1 1,144 26 


> 300 00 


3,044 48 ' : 


2,894 48 


2,366 69 


Middleton, 


407 44 


1,015 79 


580 10 


fins 


^^n fir. 


1 1 tQ n i 


448 63 


Milford, . 


4 250 30 












4,823 13 


Millbury, 


1,483 50 












1,750 05 


Millis, . 


6Qf) *iv 








An 




820 64 


Millville, 


515 79 












531 25 


Milton, . 


5 oon no 












5,000 00 


Monson, 


826 42 












836 12 


Montague, 


3,592 79 












3,671 42 


Nahant, 


1,652 74 












1,670 01 


Nantucket, 


2,223 16 












2,266 05 


Natick, . 


3,588 46 












3,904 07 


Need ham, 














4,386 06 


New Bedford, 


5,000 00 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


New Braintree, 


193 12 












203 83 


New Salem, . 


21612 












208 94 


Newbury, 


629 10 


1,694 51 


f 639 52 1 
\ 1,020 75 


} 1,065 41 


1,180 84 


2,246 25 


649 81 


New bury port, 


4,690 38 












4,775 56 


Newton, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Norfolk, 


499 67 


1,026 99 


320 55 


277 32 


1,133 01 2 


1,160 33 


532 17 


North Andover, . 


2,429 85 








80 65 




2,964 99 


No. Attleborough, . 


3,438 81 












3,453 37 



1 Lead sold. 



2 Includes sprayer. 



1921 ] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



69 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Continued. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


. Re- 
lmburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Re- 
Expend- 


North Brookfield, . 


$860 17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$878 56 


North Reading, 


463 97 


$1,126 57 


$549 10 


$662 60 


$1,411 00 


$2,073 60 


607 14 


Northborough, 


778 43 


1,713 13 


f 2P6 24 1 
\ 915 08 


} 934 70 


1,243 90 


2,178 60 


818 66 


Northbridge, . 


2,236 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,403 45 


Norton, . 


777 91 


1,736 02 


215 93 


708 11 


1,182 122 


1,640 23 


829 38 


Norwell, 


515 29 


1,336 10 


1,205 49 


570 81 


2,500 642 


2,821 45 


536 57 


Norwood, 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 


5,000 00 


Oak Bluffs, . 


918 68 


- 


- 




- 




1,049 S3 


Oakham, 


173 40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


176 12 


Orange, . 


1,748 65 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1.847 72 


Orleans, . 


531 68 


956 81 


723 72 


200 13 


1,214 99 2 


1,190 12 


656 77 


Oxford, . 


941 56 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


977 12 


Palmer, . 


2,841 65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,873 4S 


Paxton, . 


169 77 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


195 45 


Peabody, 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Pembroke, 


551 66 


2,458 71 


1,108 29 


1,907 05 


2,831 38 


4,738 43 


579 63 


Pepperell, 


1,021 54 


1,373 73 


f 125 23 1 
\ 579 16 


J 352 19 


1,388 81 


1,74100 


1,089 29 


Petersham, 


446 59 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


554 23 


Phillipston, . 


136 61 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


139 40 


Plainville, 


512 57 


1,092 53 


105 35 


589 96 


524 86 


1,114 82 


478 75 


Plymouth, 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Plympton, 


207 03 


1,225 28 


138 65 


1,018 25 


645 74 


1,663 9S 


228 27 


Princeton, 


452 54 


1,179 63 


f 104 14 1 
\ 113 14 


} 727 09 


748 31 


1,475 40 


447 53 


Provincetown, 


1,355 58 












1,525 04 


Quincy, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Randolph, 


1,161 62 














Raynham, 


526 22 


638 25 


f 35 00 3 
\ 407 96 


J 


1,184 89 2 


934 89 


546 64 


Reading, 


3,277 45 












3,686 12 


Rehoboth, 


471 94 












699 15 


Revere, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Rochester, 


452 87 


887 51 


349 50 


184 64 


1,117 03 2 


1,051 67 


469 17 


Rockland, 


2,277 72 












2,652 94 



1 Lead sold. 2 Includes sprayer. 3 Supplies sold. 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns an d 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Continued. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment . 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Rockport, 


$1,772 64 






) $624 86 






$1,818 11 


Rowley, 


413 22 


$1,038 08 


f $737 20' 
\ 753 12 


$1,212 53 


$1,837 39 


439 21 


Royalston, 


380 60 












401 07 


Rutland, 


431 15 












430 08 


Salem, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Salisbury, 


811 89 


1,005 81 


877 53 


193 92 


985 29 


1,179 21 


933 88 


Sandwich, 


586 67 


1,609 39 


f 511 71 

1 768 89 


} 1,022 72 


1,303 29 


2,326 01 


636 93 


Saugus, . 


3,206 92 












3,385 72 


Scituate, 


2,533 41 




_ 


_ 


_ 




2,923 87 


Seekonk, 


979 24 






_ 


_ 


_ 


1,019 04 


Sharon, . 


1,442 26 


1,736 53 


552 21 


294 27 




294 27 


1,531 69 


S her born, 


669 14 


3,256 74 


/ 269 44' 

\ 1 CO A AO 

{ 1,06* 48 


} 2,187 60 s 


1,393 17 


3,580 77 


704 35 


Shirley, . 


654 29 


718 58 


/ 15 00' 

1 ORf\ KM 


j 64 29 


853 32 


917 61 


785 83 


Shrewsbury, . 


1,658 05 


1,489 87 


845 98 




1.083 36 


915 18 


1,839 37 


Somerset, 


997 17 












1,154 47 


Somerville, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


South Hadley, 


2,157 74 












2,206 78 


Southborough, 


893 45 


1,894 71 


1,394 84 


1,001 26 


1,149 19 


2,150 45 


953 14 


Spencer, 


1,458 37 












1,524 52 


Springfield, . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Sterling, 


579 03 


436 09 


[ 353 16' 
( 146 50 


} - 

J 


684 17 


513 23 


596 82 


Stockbridge, . 


1,879 94 












2,298 32 


Stoneham, 


2,975 59 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2,960 59 


Stoughton, 


2,400 19 








7 49 




2,346 88 


Stow, 


462 51 


578 44 


/ 674 75' 
\ 504 20 


J 115 93 


954 93 


1,070 86 


632 89 


Sturbridge, 


428 93 












438 90 


Sudbury, 


580 10 


572 43 


/ 846 30' 

\ 325 22 


) - 


1,474 50 


1,466 83 


603 44 


Sutton, . 


665 65 












677 30 


Swampscott, . 


5,000 00 












5.000 00 


Swansea, 


772 03 












846 63 


Taunton, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 



1 Lead sold. 



3 Sherborn bought sprayer for $800, and agreed to pay one-half cost in addition to liability. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 71 



Table showing Expexditures axd Reimbursements to Towxs and 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Continued. 





1920. 


1921. 


Cities and 
Towxs. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Xet 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Templeton, 


$1,133 84 


$766 23 


( $81 00 1 

1 290 50 


| - 

J 


$437 83 


$70 22 


• 1 n*?Q QA 

$l,U<5s o0 


Tewksbury, . 


1,099 64 


2,451 27 


75129 


$1,351 63 


1,931 86 


3,283 49 


1,156 15 


Tisbury, 


866 55 












971 27 


Topsfield, 


943 41 


1,292 63 


395 97 


349 22 


224 92 


574 14 


944 94 


Townsend, 


569 79 


1,222 74 


1,025 35 


652 95 


654 02 


1,306 97 


828 04 


Truro, 


253 08 


455 62 


81 00 


202 54 


273 81 


476 35 


OCA OC 

260 26 


Tyngsborough, 


374 33 


3.494 02 


1,661 94 


2,337 29 


1,273 01 


3,610 30 


377 27 


Upton, . 


546 86 












593 18 


Uxbridge, 


1.971 59 












2,497 94 


Wakefield, 


5,000 00 




_ 




_ 




- AAA An 

0,000 00 


Wales, 


134 49 












145 14 


Walpole, 


2,964 11 












• >._ i-i Wo 


Walt nam, 


5,000 00 












C AAA AA 

0,000 00 


Ware, 


2,519 09 












a COO ylC 

2,000 4o 


Ware ham. 


2,733 90 


2,971 06 


1,005 00 




3,066 91 2 


2,388 26 


3,298 73 


Warren, 


1,180 40 












i coa OA 

l.ooO 20 


Warwick, 


181 97 












188 82 


Watertown, 


5,000 00 












C AAA AA 

5,000 00 


Way land. 


1,047 18 


660 45 


( 107 941 
I 1,126 81 


} - 
J 


1,693 64 


1,306 91 


1 OA7 OO 

1,207 2» 


Webster, 


2,685 05 












4,147 65 


V> ellesley, 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Wellfleet, 


332 37 


641 37 


138 30 


359 00 


406 22 


765 22 


351 88 


Wendell, 


275 34 




- 








2 bo 09 


Wen ham, 


906 25 


798 74 


347 10 




820 65 


713 14 


1 AOO OC 


West Boylston. 


452 68 


524 04 


/ 191211 
I 542 25 


} 7136 


700 22 


771 58 


512 68 


West Bridgewater, . 


793 08 


1,466 18 


670 00 


673 10 


1,204 45 


1,877 55 


833 36 


West Xewbury, 


416 02 


707 19 


660 43 


291 17 


593 48 


884 65 


434 48 


West Tisbury, 


228 49 












240 07 


West borough. 


1,361 57 


2,324 18 


994 66 


962 61 


888 90 


1,851 51 


1,485 20 


Westford, 


994 99 


1,090 51 


400 00 1 
\ 1,068 82 


} 95 52 


1,265 71 


1,361 33 


1,099 63 


Westminster, . 


465 59 


665 93 


257 80 


200 34 


407 43 


607 77 


462 83 


Weston, . 


2,054 91 


4,148 87 


611 40 




3,092 75 


3,092 75 


2,164 52 



i Lead sold. 



2 Includes sprayer. 



72 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements to Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1920 — Concluded. 



Westport, 


$1,239 29 


West wood, 


1,026 17 


Weymouth, . 


5,000 00 


Whitman, 


2,339 37 


Wilmington, . 


888 55 


Wine hen don, . 


1,857 80 


Winchester, . 


5,000 00 


Winthrop, 


5,000 00 


Woburn, 


5,000 00 


Worcester, 


5,000 00 


Wrentham, 


728 94 


Yarmouth, 


788 52 



1920. 



Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 



Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 



$2,261 31 
1,114 40 



1,395 11 



Private 
Work. 



$1,016 43 
506 40 



221 79 



Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 



$1,082 76 



606 59 



Tools 
supplied. 



$1,888 68 
248 55 



766 27 



Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 



$2,971 44 



1,372 86 



1921. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



73 



The Distribution of Supplies. 

Supplies, including arsenate of lead and hose, have been 
furnished to towns and cities doing gypsy-moth work, as usual. 
The amounts given in the list below do not always correspond 
exactly with the aid given the towns, as some towns make 
payments to the State for all or a part of the bill for supplies, 
according to the amount of their net expenditure or their class, - 
under the provisions of chapter 381, Acts of 1905. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement and 
for expenditures, see table on page 64. 



List of Cities and Towns and Amounts of Supplies furnished for 

1920. 



Acton, 




Groveland, 


qfrO i 1 UO 


Ashburnham , 


004 UO 




1 A'XO RQ I 


Ashby, 


CQO Q1 


Hamilton, 




Ashland, 


Q70 *?7 


Hanover, 




Avon, . 


1 HQ A(\ 
lUo 4U 


Hanson, 


TOA *7R 


Ayer, . 


AC\R AO 


Harvard, 




xJeaiora, 


1 C\QA 1 Q 


Harwich, 


1 1 R7 
1,10/ Oi 


Berlin, 




Holbrook, 


1 1 AO CQ 


Bolton, 


1,0U1 oo 


xioiaen, 


con oc 


Bourne, 


OZ ( OO 1 


Holliston, 


014 Zo 


TtmrVvimiicrfi 


1,197 46 


Hopkinton, 


990 55 1 


Boxford, 


1,143 76 


Hudson, 


6 35 


Boylston, 


538 85 


Ipswich, 


4 47 


Brewster, 


1,313 ll 1 


Kingston, 


1,048 14 


Bridgewater, 


2,884 98i 


Lakeville, 


1,177 90 


Burlington, . 


643 69 


Lincoln, 


1,986 21 


Canton, 


102 16 


Lunenburg, . 


1,281 22 


Carlisle, 


564 84 


Lynnfield, 


1,396 97 


Carver, 


2,559 44 


Marion, 


2,991 75i 


Chatham, 


1,066 471 


Marshfield, . 


1,660 94 


Chelmsford, . 


1,619 59 


Mashpee, 


1,067 44 


Dennis, 


1,366 48 1 


Medfield, 


1,151 04 


Dover, 


2,115 81 


Merrimac, . 


298 82 


Dracut, 


1,715 12 


Middle borough, 


3,044 48 1 


Dunstable, . 


719 71 


Middleton, . 


550 66 


Duxbury, 


1,477 96 


Millis, . 


56 00 


East Bridgewater, 


2,028 74i 


Newbury, 


1,180 84 


Eastham, 


911 57i 


Norfolk, 


1,133 Oli 


Easton, 


1,938 37 


North Andover, 


80 65 


Essex, . 


258 39 


North Reading, 


1,411 00 


Falmouth, 


3,162 82i 


Northborough, 


1,243 90 


Foxbo rough, 


256 04 


Norton, 


1,182 121 


Franklin, 


4 80 


Norwell, 


2,500 64i 


Georgetown, 


1,096 20 


Orleans, 


1,214 99i 


Groton, 


1,050 98 


Pembroke, . 


2,831 38 



1 This includes cost of sprayer. 



74 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



List of Cities and Towns and Amounts of Supplies furnished for 

1920 — Concluded. 



X c|->JJt;l dl, . 


$1,388 81 


Townsend, . 


$654 02 


X Idlll V lllc , 


524 86 


Truro, . 


273 81 




/ 645 74 


Tyngsborough, 


1,273 01 


Princeton, 


748 31 


Ware ham, 


3,066 91 1 


Tinvnham 

llu j iijiaiii, • • 


1,184 89 1 


Wayland, 


1,693 64 


Rochester, 


1,117 03 1 


Wellfleet, 


406 22 


T? nwlpv 

xw »V1^J , • 


1,212 53 


Wenham, 


820 65 


ftn 1 1 «Vn it* v 


985 29 


West Boylston, 


700 22 


Sandwich, 


1,303 29 


West Bridgewater, 


1,204 45 


Sherborn, 


2,193 17 1 


West Newbury, 


593 48 


Shirley, 


853 32 


Westborough, 


888 90 


Shrewsbury, 


1,083 36 


Westford, . 


1,265 71 


Southborough, 


1,149 19 


Westminster, 


407 43 


Sterling, 


684 17 


Weston, 


3,092 75 


Stoughton, . 


7 49 


Wilmington, 


1,888 68 


Stow, . 


954 93 


Winchendon, 


248 55 


Sudbury, 


1,474 50 


Yarmouth, . 


766 27 


Temple ton, . 


437 83 






Tewksbury, . 


1,931 86 




$120,771 01 


Topsfield, . 


224 92 







General forestry and nurseries, ....... $191 80 

Maintenance of forests, ......... 120 96 

Maintenance of Swann Forest, ....... 26 65 

Prevention of forest fires, ........ 185 61 

Massachusetts Highway Commission, ...... 1,31646 

Special North Shore fund, 33 95 

Purchase and development of State forests, . . . . . Ill 90 



$1,987 33 



Statement of Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests for 
the Year ending Nov. 30, 1920. 





Expenses. 




State Forest. 


Planting. 


General 
Upkeep, 
Fire Lines, 
Roads, 
etc. 


Nursery. 


Land. 


Total. 


Receipts. 


Arthur Warton Swann, . 


$462 00 


$464 01 






$926 01 


$591 12 


Harold Parker, 


1,405 46 


1,415 78 




S623 00 


3,444 24 


11 25 


Myles Standish, 


3,942 39 


3,271 54 


$312 98 




7,526 91 


580 52 


Otter River, . 


1,535 19 


990 93 


107 74 


14 63 


2,648 49 


62 38 


Savoy Mountain, . 


1,544 82 


332 44 


672 40 


1,000 00 


3,549 66 


90 00 


Totals, . 


$8,889 86 


$6,474 70 


SI, 093 12 


$1,637 63 


$18,095 31 


$1,335 27 



1 This includes cost of sprayer. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 75 

List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents. 



[Alphabetically by towns and cities.] 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


No. 


398-R, 


J. H. Mackins, . 


Abington, . 


C. F. Shaw, 


5 


71-4, West Acton, 


Wm. H. Kingsley, 


Acton, . 


J. O'Neil, . 


2 


2003-M, 


Henry F. Taber, 


Acushnet, . 


A. P. R. Gilmore, 


4 


383-J, . 


Edgar A. Deyette, 


Adams, 


Edgar A. Deyette, . 


6 


6465-M, River, . 




Agawam, 


E. M. Hitchcock, 


6 


161-6, . 


Wm. F. Milligan, 


Alford, 








Jas. E. Feltham, 


Amesbury, . 


Joseph Merrill, . 


3 


483-J, . 


A. F. Bard well, . 


Amherst, 


W. H. Smith, 


6 


212, 


Lester Hilton, 


Andover, 


Edw. H. Berry, 


3 


35 and 206, . 


W. H. Pierce, 


Arlington, . 


Daniel M. Daley, 


2 


5-12, . 


C. H. Billings, . 


Ashburnham, 


Chas. H. Pratt, 


2 


22-5 and 2-3, 


Wm. S. Green, . 


Ashby, 


Carl H. Houghton, . 


2 


3-5, 


Ralph Tredick, . 


Ashfield, 




6 


546-M, 


Chester MacNear, 


Ashland, 


Theodore P. Hall, 


2 




Frank P. Hall, . 


Athol, . 


George A. Whitney, . 


6 


34-R-4 , 


H. R. Packard, . 


Attleboro, . 


W. E. b. omith, 


4 


5-12, . 


J. F. Searle, 


Auburn, 


J. F. Searle, 


6 


2967-J, Brockton, 


Chas. S. Wheeler, 


Avon, . 


W. W. Beals, 


4 


306-3, . 


D. C. Smith, 


Ayer, . 


D. C. Smith, 


2 




Zebina H. Jenkins, 


Barnstable, 


Robert Cross, . 


5 


83-4, . 


A. E. Traver, 


Barre, . 


Jas. A. Dwinnell, 


6 


8000 and 18, 


P. B. McCormick, 


Becket, 






498-W, Lexington, 


Irving C. Waite, . 


Bedford, 


W. A. Cutler, . 


3 


31-3, . 


Herbert F. Shaw, 


Belchertown, 


E. C. Howard, . * 


6 


8639-2, Milford, . 


L. F. Thayer, 


Bellingham, 


Lewis E. Whitney, . 


4 


409-W, 


J. F. Leonard, 


Belmont, 


Martin Troy, 


2 


1443-R, 


Gideon H. Babbitt, . 


Berkley, 


A. A. Briggs, 


4 


17-2, . 


Forrest E. Day, . 


Berlin, 


C. A. Howe, 


2 


43-3, . 


Thurman H. Keet, 


Bernardston, 


Edwin B. Hale, 


6 


2-0, . 


Robert H. Grant, 


Beverly, 


Jas. W. Blackmer, 


1 


22-4 and 22-5, . 


E. N. Bartlett, . 


Billerica, 


Francis J. Dolan, 


3 




John H. Dwyer, 


Blackstone, 


A. J. Duggan, . 


6 


16-3, . 


I. E. Whitney, . 


Blandford, . 






3-3, . 


Albert I. Pardee, 


Bolton, 


C. E. Mace, 


2 






Boston, 


Wm. P. Long, . 


. '1 . 



76 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



TlTT TPT>TTr*"V"I? 
X -t. Lj iLii: t\.\J -S jLi 

Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


i " a i AL' » 1 H 

S uperintendent . 


No. 


38 and 44-3, 


W. E. R. Nye, . 


Bourne, 


Edw. D. Nickerson, . 


5 


102-2, West Acton, 


H. J. Livermore, 


Boxborough, 


S. D. Salmon, 3d, 


2 


19-31, Topsfield, . 


Clarence E. Brown, . 


Boxford, 


C. Perley, . 


3 


29-2, . 


John N. Flagg, . 


Boylston, 


Walter G. Brigham, . 


6 




James M. Cutting, 


Braintree, . 


Wm. J. McCusker, . 


4 


76-23, . 


T. B. Tubman, . 


Brewster, 


Abbott N. Baker, 


5 


281-3, . 


F. C. Worthen, . 


Bridgewater, 


F. C. Worthen, . 


5 


18-2, . 


Geo. E. Hitchcock, 


Brimfield, . 


Frank G. Hitchcock, 


6 


Fire Department, 


Edw. F. Dahill, . 


Brockton, . 


Rufus H. Carr, 


5 


101-3, . 


P. E. Gadaire, . 


Brookfield. . 


J. H. Conant, . 


6 




Geo. H. Johnson, 


Brookline, . 


Ernest B. Dane, 


1 


15-4, . 


Walter W. Skelton, 


Burlington, 


Walter W. Skelton, . 


3 


52-8, . 


Gilbert E. Griswold, . 


Buckland, . 










Cambridge, 


J. F. Donnelly, 


2 




Edward Healy, . 


Canton, 


Wm. H. Gallivan, 


4 


76-M, Concord, . 


Geo. G. Wilkins, 


Carlisle, 


Geo. G. Wilkins, 


3 


27-22, . 


James S. McKay, 


Carver, 


James S. McKay, 


5 


14-12, . 


Albert L. Veber, 


Charlemont, 






42-2, . 


E. A. Lamb, 


Charlton, . 


Thos. Ashworth, 


6 


28-3, . 


Geo. W. Ryder, . 


Chatham, . 


Richard G. Luard, . 


5 




Arnold C. Perham, 


Chelmsford, 


Walter Shepard, 


3 






Chelsea, 


J. A. O'Brien, . 


1 


2S5-M, 


T"\ * it it r j 

Daniel L. Wood, 
Wm. H. Babb, . 


Cheshire, 
Chester, 






8-2, . 


Wm. H. Baker, Jr., 


Cnesterneld, 






149-M, 


John E. Pomphret, 


Chicopee, 


Edw. Bourbeau, 


6 




Robert W. Vincent, . 


Chilmark, . 


Almon S. Tilton, 


5 


485-X, 


A. G. Caswell, 


Clarksburg, 


B. F. Eddy, 


6 


312-VV, 


Andrew J. Robinson, . 


Clinton, 


Peter R. Gibbons, 


2 


260, 


Wm. J. Brennock, 


Cohasset, 


George Young, . 


5 


23-2, . 


Frank A. Walden, 


Colrain, 


E. F. Copeland, 


6 


438-M, 


Harry E. Tuttle, 
Edgar Jones, 


Concord, 
Conway, 


H. P. Richardson, . 


2 


41-2, . .' . 


W. F. Mansell, . 


Cummington, 






81-J, 


S. L. Caesar, 


Dalton, 








Leroy H. Thayer, 


Dana, . 


Thos. L. Thayer, 


6 




Michael H. Barry, 


Danvers, 


T. E. Tinsley, . 


1 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 77 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Wasden. ' 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent . 


Div. 
No. 


1658-5 


V. XX. .UCaU| • . 


Dartmouth 


Xj • JX . -x»-L UlloUll | • • 


4 


Oto-oO, xiOCK, 


H. J. Harrigan, 


X^UlXXldilXl , . 


T T T\ r pnnorl ■» r 


4 


-jo---, vTicciiiieicii 


Wm. L. Harris, . 




Wm. L. TTarriSi ■ . 


g 


8118-4 


V^llclO. Xj. X . t 1 I > , . 


TjAn n i q 


PViflc IS! *Pi*»rn*> 

V- Mil?. JLi . X III Lt , s 




29-3 




Di ^Vrfnn 


Albert X" PnfT 




11-4, . 


Wm. L. Church, 


Douglas, 


F. J. Libby, 


6 


38-2 


Geo W. Armstrong 


Dover, 


H. L \Tac Ivenzie 


4 




"Frank TT Piinth^r 


Dracut, . . 


T F Parrir»tV 


3 


423-R, 


F. A. Putnam, 


Dudley, 


Herbert J. Hill, 


6 


5-11 


\rchie W Swallow 


Dunstable 


IT - XX. ua Vlil| • a 


2 


82-2 


H. E. Merry, 


Duxbury, 


John D "\Iorrison 


5 




If. F. Roach, 


East Bridgewater, 

TP T.onarmAA.r1nw 


Allan B. Shaw 

TTprmon W TCincr 

XXdlllclXl TT . JVii.^,, . 


g 


24-3 


\rlin L Rill 

• \U111 ±J, VJ 111 . 


TP. a Via m 

XJ do t IX <X ILL , . 


Wm "R TTitrcrina 

TTill. XJ . XXlgglllSf • 




365-3, 


John \T. Dineen, 


Easthampton, 


Chas. Kuhfuss • 


g 


225-3 


Daniel Lordon 


Easton 


T? W MVIonHv 

XL. TT . .»H IU.4) | • 




241-2, 


Afanuel Swartz 


Edgartown, 


John P "Fuller 

*JUUU X . X U11C1 | ■ • 




165-25, 


Frank Bradford, 


Egremont, 






31-21 


Clinton Powell 




TT P 

XX. v^/. .ALuurt?. • • 


g 




Charles H. Holmes, 


Erving, 


P H HnlmpQ 


g 


51-3, . 


Otis 0. Story, . 


Essex, . 


Otis 0. Story, . 


1 






Everett, 


Dana Hanson, . 


2- 


1686-Y, 


Chas. F. Benson, 


Fair haven, . 


G. W. King, 


4 


822- W, 


Wm. Stevenson, . 


Fall River, . 


Wm. Stevenson, 


4 


136-2, . 


Herbert H. Lawrence, . 


Falmouth, . 


W. W. Eldridge, Jr., . 


5 


745, . 


Guy A. Hubbard, 


Fitchburg, . 


Guy A. Hubbard, 


2 


9417-3, Hoosac 
Tunnel pay sta- 
tion. 

131 and 76, . 


H. B. Brown, 
Ernest A. White, 


Florida, 
Foxborough, 


C. W. Parkhurst, 


4 


352-4, . 


B. P. Winch, 


Framingham, 


N. I. Bowditch, 


4 


149-R, 


Ernest L. Metcalf, 


Franklin, . 


J. W. Stobbart, . 


4 


19-3, 


Oscar M. Hanson, 


Freetown, 


G. M. Nichols, . 


4 


191-161, 


Geo. S. Hodgman, 


Gardner, 


Chas. J. Crabtree, . 


6 




Nelson Francis, . 


Gay Head, . 


Nelson A. Francis, . 


5 




Leslie P. Merrill, 


Georgetown, 


Jacob Hazen, 


3 


222-12, 


Lewis C. Munn, . 


Gill, . 


Warren R. Purple, 


6 


2102-M, 


Harland W. Dann, 


Gloucester, 


Harland W. Dann, . 


6 



78 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


18-16, . 


Frank Rice, 


Goshen, 


- 


- 




Frederick A. Veeder, . 


Gosnold, 






18-2, . • . • . 


E. E. Sibley, 


Grafton, 


C. K. Despeau, 


6 




Chas. N. Rust, . 


Granby, 


George A. Harris, 


6 


5-13, . 


Albert C. Sheets, 


Granville, . 






327, 

1185, . 


D. W. Flynn, 
John W. Bragg, . 


Great Barring- 
ton. 
Greenfield, . 


Daniel W. Flynn, 
John W. Bragg, 


6 
6 




Wm. H. Walksr, . 


Greenwich, 


Thos. Severance, Jr., 


6 




A. A. Wood, 


Groton, 


Shadrach Evans, 


2 


929-M, Haverhill, 


Geo. L. Nelson, . 


Groveland, . 


R. D. Larive, . 


3 


651-33, 


Edward P. West, 


Hadley, 


Leroy C. Savin, 


6 


5-21 and 33-33, 
Bryantville. 


Geo. H. Armstrong, . 
Fred Berry, 


Halifax, 
Hamilton, . 


John A. Wood, . 
Harry R. McGregor, 


5 
1 




John Swenson, . 


Hampden, . 








Alfred Rathbone, 


Hancock, 






441-W, Rockland, 


Louis E. Stone, . 


Hanover, 


Chas. B. Drew, 


5 


12-23, Bryantville, 


Geo. T. Moore, . 


Hanson, 


George T. Moore, 


5 


43-12, . 


George J. Fay, . 


Hardwick, . 


George J. Fay, . 


6 


63-3, . 


Geo. C. Maynard, 


Harvard, 


Geo. C. Maynard, 


2 


8-2 and 23-4, 


John Condon, 


Harwich, 


Arthur F. Cahoon, 


5 


72-4, . . - . 


Fred T. Bard well, 


Hatfield, 


Seth W. Kingsley, 


6 


Fire station, 


John B. Gordon, 


Haverhill, . 


M. J. Fitzgerald, 


3 


17-7, . 


Herbert A. Holden, . 


Hawley, 






5-18, . 


S. G. Benson, 


Heath, 






570 and 344-M, . 


William L. Howard, . 


Hingham, . 


T. L. Murphy, . 


5 


33-12, . 


Alfred N. Warren, 


Hinsdale, 






42-4, . 


Melvin L. Coulter, 
Winfred H. Stearns, 


Holbrook, . 
Holden, 


Frederick W. Whit- 
comb. 
Winfred H. Stearns, . 


4 
6 


5-21, . 


Oliver L. Howlett, 


Holland, 


Arthur F. Blodgett, . 


6 


113 and 46-3, 


Waldo A. Collins, 


Holliston, . 


Herbert E. Jones, 


2 




C. J. Haley, 


Holyoke, 


John F. Kennedy, 


6 


248-W, 


Samuel E. Kellogg, 


Hopedale, . 


C. E. Nutting, . 


6 


19, 


George W. Smith, 


Hopkinton, 


W. A. Macmillan, 


6 


8040, . 


A. E. Bennett, . 


Hubbardston, 


Chas. P. Wyman, 


6 


24 and 199- J, 


M. P. Mitchell, . 


Hudson, 


T. J. Higgins, . 


2 






Hull, . 


John F. Smith, . 


5 


4-11, . 


John J. Kirby, . 


Huntington, 







1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 79 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


iown or L/iiy. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent . 


Div. 
No. 


137-R and 135-2, . 


Thos. R. Roberts, 


Ipswich, 


Francis C. Wade, 


1 


103, 


Roland Bailey, 


Kingston, 


Chas. H. Childs, 




261-W, Middle- 
borough. 


N. F. Washburn, 
Arthur W. Blood, 
King D. Keeler, . 


Lakeville, 
Lancaster, . 
Lanesborough, . 


Leavitt C. Caswell, . 
L. R. Griswold, 


5 
2 


805-362 and 3610, . 


Francis J. Morris, 
James W. Bossidy, 


Lawrence, . 
Lee, 


John H. Brown, 


3 


35-3, Leicester, 


John A. Fitzpatrick, . 


Leicester, 


J. H. Woodhead, 


6 


28, 29 and 546, . 


Oscar R. Hutchinson, 
Fred A. Russell, 


Lenox, . 
Leominster, 


Wheeler A. Shepard- 
son. 

D. E. Bassett, . 


5 
2 


9-25, . 


Fred L. Morrison, 


Leverett, 


I. H. Taylor, 


g 


480, 


Osborne J. Gorman, . 


Lexington, . 


Osborne J. Gorman, . 


3 


284-41, 


A. G. Parks, 


Ley den, 


Jacob Sauter, 


6 


44-W, . 


John J. Kelliher, 


Lincoln, 


John J. Kelliher, 


2 


17-4, . 


A. E. Hopkins, . 


Littleton, 


A. E. Hopkins, 


2 


6375-J, River, 


Oscar C. Pomeroy, 


Longmeadow, 






3400, . 


Edward F. Saunders, . 


Lowell, 


J. G. Gordon, 


3 


1-12, . 


Henry A. Munsing, 


Ludlow, 


Ashley M. Bucher, . 


6 


20, 


James S. Gilchrest, 


Lunenburg, 


J. S. Gilchrest, 


2 




John P. Morrissey, 


Lynn, . 


John P. Morrissey, 


1 


3682-M, Lynn, . 


F. C. Newhall, . 


Lynnfield, . 


L. H. Twiss, 


1 




Watson B. Gould, 


Maiden, 


Watson B. Gould, 


2 


319-VV, 


Peter A. Sheahan, 


Manchester, 


Peter A. Sheahan, 




1-R, 281-W and 

l-W. 
355, . 


Herbert E. King, 
John T. Adams, . 


Mansfield, . 
Marblehead, 


Alexander Murphy, 
W. H. Stevens, 


4 
1 


117-2, . 


George B. Nye, . 


Marion, 


J. Allenach 








Marlborough, 


M. E. Lyons, 


2 


43-3, . 


William G. Ford, 


Marshfield, . 


P. R. Livermore, 


5 


31-2, Cotuit, 


Darius C. Coombs, 


Mashpee, 


S. H. Peters, 


5 


52-5, . 


Chas. T. Dexter, . 


Mattapoisett, 


John S Limiimoncl 




115-4 and 72, 


Geo. H. Gutteredge, . 


Maynard, . 


John F. Cleary, 


2 




Lawrence M. Dewar, . 


Medfield, . 


G. L. L. Allen, . 


4 


138, . 


Thomas A. Qualey, 


Medford, . 


Hugh G. Kennedy, . 


2 


6-2, . . 


John B. Durfee, . 


Med way, 


F. Hagar, . 


4 






Melrose, 


J. J. McCullough, . 


3 




Carl M. Taft, 


Mendon, 


F. M. Aldrich, . 


6 


3-5, . 


Chas. R. Ford, . 


Merrimac, . 


Chas. R. Ford, . 


3 



80 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


229, Lawrence, . 


Thomas Dow, 


Methuen, 


A. H. Wagland, 


3 


76-Y, . 
8000, . 


John J. Fowler, Jr., . 
George E. Cook, 


Middleborough, . 
Middlefield, 


John J. Fowler, Jr., . 


5 


475-16, Dan vers, . 


Thos. M. Robinson, . 


Middleton, . 


B. T. McGlauflin, . 


1 


37-M, . 


Edward J. Burke, 


Milford, 


P. F. Fitzgerald, 


6 


259, . 


Harry L. Snelling, 


Millbury, . 


E. F. Roach, . 


6 


73, 


Chas. LaCroix, . 


Millis, . 


Everett L. Coldwell, 


4 


1149-J-l, Woon- 

socket . 
1022-W, 


Robert A. McLaughlin, 
Ralph S. Carpenter, . 


Millville, 
Milton, 


Andrew J. Gibbons, . 
Ralph E. Forbes, 


6 
4 


13-13, . 


Edw. C. David, . 


Monroe, 






12-22, . 


O. E. Bradway, . 


Monson, 


Robert S. Fay, . 


6 


14-4, . 


Thomas Berard, . 


Montague, . 


F. B. Gillette, . 


6 


401-43, 


Jasper H. Bills, . 


Monterey, . 


_ _ 




3-24, Russell, 


Andrew J. Hall, . 


Montgomery, 




- 


17-6, . 

— - 


Howard Porter, . 


Mount Washing- 
ton. 
Nahant, 


Herbert Coles, . 


1 


16-3, . 


E. W. Francis, 


Nantucket, 


W. M. Voorneveld, . 


5 




John H. Neary, . 


Natick, 


Jesse E. Wight, . 


2 


142, . 


H. Howard L'pham, . 
Chas. S. Baker, . 


Needham, . 
New Ashford, 


George Twigg, . 


4 


2280, . 


Edward F. Dahill, 


New Bedford, 


C. F. Law ton, . 


4 


6-4, Gilbertville, . 


Frank A. Morse, 


New Braintree, . 


E. L. Havens, . 


6 


13-6, . 

113-5,Cooleyville, 


Edward M. Stanton, . 
Frank L. Hamilton, . 


New Marlbor- 
ough. 
New Salem, 


Frank Hamilton, 


6 


1112-5, 


Wm. P. Bailey, . 


Newbury, . 


Percy Oliver, 


3 


380, . 


Charles P. Kelley, 


Newburyport, . 


Chas. P. Kelley, 


3 


30,Center Newton, 


Walter B. Randlett, . 


Newton, 


Chas. Benyon, . 


2 


41-13, . 


Stephen Watson, 


Norfolk, 


J. Albert Buckley, . 


4 


205-W, 


H. J. Montgomery, 


North Adams, . 


Jackson L. Temple, . 


6 


1029-J, 


Wm. L. Smith, . 


North Andover, . 


Wm. L. Smith, . 


3 


63-4, . 


Harry W. Tufts, 
Oscar C. Hirbour, 


North Attlebor- 

ough. 
North Brookfield, 


F. P. Toner, 

S. B. Colburn, . 


4 
6 




George E . Eaton, 


North Reading, 


George E. Eaton, 


3 


165, . 


John F. Marlowe, 


Northampton, . 


Chas. A. Maynard, . 


6 


11, 


Frank Gates, 


Northborough, . 


T. P. Haskell, . 


6 


180 and 71-5, 


W. E. Burnap, . 


Northbridge, 


A. F. Whitin, . 


6 


114-2, . 


Fred W. Doane, . 


Northfield, . 


Fred W. Doane, 


6 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 81 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


18-11, . 


George H. Storer, 


Norton, 


Solomon C. Haskell, . 


4 


43-3, . 


John T. Osborn, 


Norwell, 


Fred M. Curtis, 


5 


417-M, 


Frank W. Talbot, 


Norwood, . 


Wm. P. Hammersley, 


4 


241-12, 


George A. Smith, 


Oak Bluffs, 


D. J. McBride, . 


5 


17-5, . 


C. H. Trowbridge, 


Oakham, 


C. H. Trowbridge, . 


6 


18-3, . 


William Walsh, . 


Orange, 


Elbridge S. Blodgett, 


6 


33-2, . 


James Boland, . 


Orleans, 


A. Smith, . 


5 




Albert H. Spencer, 


Otis, . 


- 




2-4, . . 


Arthur A. Allen, 


Oxford, 


Eugene Wetherell, 


6 


53-W and 53-R, . 


James Summers, 


Palmer, 


Arthur F. Bennett, . 


6 


881-R, Cedar, . 


Henry H. Pike, . 


Paxton, 


H. S. Robinson, 


6 


_ _ 


John J. Callahan, 


Peabody, 


J. J. Callahan, . 


',%■ 


5-W, . 


John H. Hubbard, 


Pelham, 


Leigh Weaver, . 


6 


83-3, Bryantville, 


J. J. Shepherd, . 


Pembroke, . 


Wm. C. Jones, . 


5 


8015-4, Hanover. 




23-21, . 


G. M. Palmer, . 


Pepperell, . 


John Tune, 


2 


_ _ 


Walter H. Pike, . 


Peru, . 




_ 


61, 


George Marsh, 


Petersham, . 


Daniel Broderick, 


6 


176-6, . 


W. H. Cowlbeck, 


Phillipston, 


Wm. H. Cowlbeck, . 


6 


535-M, 


Chas. L. Klein, . 


Pittsfield, . 


_ _ 


_ 


67-6, . 


E. H. Nye, 


Plainfield, . 


_ 


_ 


226-J, . 


Frank V. Herrick, 


Plainville, . 


George H. Snell, 


4 


264, . 


Ira C. Ward, 


Plymouth, . 


A. A. Raymond, 


5 


13-7, Kingston, . 


David L. Bricknell, . 


Plympton, . 


David L. Bricknell, . 


5 


19-4, CooleyviUe, 


Fred W. Doubleday, . 


Prescott, 


C. M. Pierce, . 


6 


13-4, . 


Fred W. Bryant, 


Princeton, . 


F. A. Skinner, . 


6 


129-11, 


James H. Barnett, 


Provincetown, . 


F. G. Hill, 


5 


6, 


Alfred L. Mead, . 


Quincy, 


A. J. Stewart, . 


4 


_ 


_ _ 


Randolph, . 


John F. Moore, . 


4 


1263-M, 


J. C. Williams, . 


Raynham, . 


G. M. Leach, . 


4 


430, . 


Orville 0. Ordway, . 


Reading, 


H. M. Donegan, 


3 


11-12, . 


B. F. Munroe, 


Rehoboth, . 


Chas. B. Douglas, 


4 






Revere, 


Herbert T. White, . 




8-2, . . 


Timothy B. Salmon, . 


Richmond, . 






12-32, . 


Daniel E. Hartley, . 


Rochester, . 


Samuel H. Corse, 


5 


55-X, . 


John H. Burke, . 


Rockland, . 


F. H. Shaw, . 


5 


14-4, . 


John C. Martin, . 


Rockport, . 


F. A. Babcock, . 




21-6, . 


Merritt A. Peck, 


Rowe, . 







S2 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


.L/ocai Aiotn 
Superintendent. 


■nil- 
No. 


3-13, . 


Daniel O Bnen, . 


Rowley, 


Chas. Curtis, 


3 


177-5, Athol, 


Myron E. btockwell, . 


Royalston. . 


E. S. Stewart, . 


6 


12-3, 


\\m. U. Chad wick, 


Russell, 










Rutland, 


H. E. Wheeler, . 


6 






Salem, . 


Oliver G. Pratt, 


1 


1046-M, 


Chas. J. Penniman, 


Salisbury, . 


Chas. J. Penniman, . 


3 


202-3, . 


CD. Strickland, 


Sandisfield, 






76-2, 


Jerome R. Holway. 


Sandwich, . 


Lincoln Crowell, 


5 




T. E. Berrett, 


Saugus, 


T. E. Berrett, . 


1 


4-16, . 


C. E. Tilton, 


Savoy, . 






141-4, . 


Chas. If. Litchfield, . 


Scituate, 


TIT— T7< T"»— J 

>\m. F. ford, . 


5 


.ICO TO T") „ 

462-J-2, r a w - 

tucket. 
226, 


Herbert S. Baker, 
W. C. Morse, 


Seekonk, 
Sharon, 


C. A. Smith, 
r red A. \V nite, . 


4 
4 


34, 


R. W. Smith, 


Sheffield, 






130-2, . 


Chas. S. Dole, 


Shelburne, . 


Chas. S. Dole, . 


6 




John C. Jackson, 


Sherborn, . 


Geo. W. Rock, . 


2 




Asa A. Adams, . 


Shirley, 


Asa A. Adams, . 


2 




Edward A. Logan, 


Shrewsbury, 


Kobt. U. Clapp, 


6 




Clarence N. Mellen, . 


Shutesbury, 


E. C. Johnson, . 


6 


- 


F. B. Butterworth, . 


Somerset, 


C. Riley, . 


4 






Somerville, . 


A. a. rncnard, 


2 




Louis H. Lamb, . 


South Hadley, 


Louis H. Lamb, 


6 


151-14, 


W. J. Lyman, 


Southampton, . 






13-.M, Marlbor- 
ough. 
11, 


Harry Burnett, . 
Aimee Langevin, 
Benjamin M. Hastings, 


Southborough, . 

Southbridge, 

Southwick, 


Harry Burnett, 
Aimee Langevin, 


6 
6 


134-4 and 53-2, . 


Earl J. Potter, 


Spencer, 


G. Ramer, 


6 


167-2, Indian Or- 
chard. 
5-12, . 


Frank C. Smith, 
J. T. Wilder, 


Springfield, 
Sterling, 


L. Fletcher Prouty, . 
J. ti. Ivilburn, . 


6 

2 


87-M, . 


George Schneyer, 


Stockbridge, 


George Schneyer, 


6 


176-W and 127, . 


Albert J. Smith, 


Stoneham, . 


G. M. Jefts, 


3 


121-3 and 218-2, . 


Frederick H. Pye, 


Stoughton, 


W. P. Kennedy, 


4 


166-2, Hudson, . 


Harold A. Priest, 


Stow, . 


H . W. Herrick, . 


2 


6-1, Fiskdale, 


Charles M. Clarke, 


Sturbridge, 


C. M. Clarke, . 


6 




Seneca W. Hall, . 


Sudbury, 


Chas. A. Brackett, . 


2 


46, South Deer- 
field. 
58-4, Millbury, . 


A. C. Warner, 

R. H. Richardson, 


Sunderland, 
Sutton, 


Richard Graves, 

R. H. Richardson, . 


6 
6 



1921.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



83 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 



Forest Warden. 



Town or City. 



Local Moth 
Superintendent. 



Div. 
No. 



191 1-J, Lynn, 


1 

Everett P. Mudge, 


Swampscott, 


Everett P. Mudge, 


1 


62-Y, Warren, 


Amos F. Maker, . 


Swansea, 


A. E. Arnold, 


4 


1 and 320, . 


Fred A. Leonard, 


Taunton, 


ri. M. -Briggs, 


4 


Oft J OA 

6\) ana 6v, 


O.-A. rletcher, 


Templeton, 


T \VkAnlA»- 

j . o . >> neeicr, 


6 


424 9-J, 


Harris M. Briggs, 


Tewksbnry, 


H. U. Bnggs, 


3 


l\)i-S ana lol-4, . 


Hlmer L. L-hadwick, . 


Tisbury, 


TJ W \T«T ..Hon 

xi. w. JYlcLiellan, 


5 


i(jy-lo, mnstea, 

Conn. 
36-6, . 


Kupert Hi. dark, 
W E. Burnham, 


lolland, 
Topsfield, . 


Wayland E. Burnham, 


1 


14-4, 


Alark rt. LolDy, . 


Townsend, . 


Wm. W. Copeland, 


2 




\> alter r . rlicn, . 


Truro, . 


T TJT W 

J . HI. At wood, 


5 




L. J. Aiigrove, 


Tyngsborough, . 


/~* T A llfrcrMm 

L-. J. Allgrove, . 


3 


278-3, . 


George R. Warren, 


Tyringham, 






9-3, 


Henry Hi. Ailard, 


Upton, 


Clarence L. Goodrich, 


6 




Louis F. Maroney, 


Uxbridge, 


Frank J. O'Brien, 


6 


EO 
00, 


>t . Hi . oaae, 


wdKeneia, 


W W W, f + mA rrr. 

\> . \> . w lttreage, 


3 


9-11 and 9-23, 
Brimfield. 

110 9 


Leon H. Thompson, . 
Aaam n,. uock, . 


Wales, . 
Walpole, 


M. C. Royce, . 

pu;i;„ t> a Han 
Hnilip ±v. Allen, 


6 

2 


D, ... 


George L. Johnson, 


waitnam, 


W. M. Kyan, 


2 


070 


A. rt. Higeon, 


Ware, 


F. Zeissig, . 


6 


1 07 

18/, 


James J. Walsh, . 


Wareham, 


J. J. Walsh, 


5 




T AT Aniline 

i . ivl. i^omns, 


Warren, 


Nathan H. Powers, . 


ft 



71 1 


L. A. Williams, . 


Warwick, 


Chas. Bass, 


6 


i i , rJecket , . 


A. Li. HLayes, 


Washington, 






116, Newton 
North. 

61-6, 


\ an D. Horton, . 
Howard C. Haynes, . 


Watertown, 
Wayland, 


van \j . riorton, 

TV T f 1 V. 

D . J . (jraham, . 


o 
a 

2 


101-R 


TT T Wo 11 i o 

Hi. Ld. waius, 


Webster, 


L. Hvlebart, 


6 


Q onrl 701 


jonn sr. uoyie, 


Wellesley, 


i nos. i . v> at t, . 


A 

4 




John Holbrook, . 


weiineet, 


Wm. HI. Li 111, 


5 


_ _ 


Henry Champlin, 


Wendell, 


G. E. Mills, 


6 


74, 


Jacob D. Barnes, 


Wenham, 


Jacob D. Barnes, 


1 


36, 


H.E.Lowe, 


West Boylston, . 


H. E. Lowe, 


6 




W. P. Laughton, 


West Bridgewater, 


0. Belmore, 


5 


114-3, . 


John H. Webb, . 


West Brookfield, 


John H. Webb, . 


6 


33, 


Edward Johnston, 


West Newbury, . 


Frank D. Bailey, 


3 






West Springfield, 


George W. Hayden, . 


6 




B. P. Bissell, 


West Stockbridge, 






57-15, . 


John Pease, 


West Tisbury, . 


Jerry B. Mayhew, 


5 



84 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 1921. 



List of Forest Wardens axd Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



Telephone 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


153-12, 


Thos. W. Humphrey, . 


Westborough, 


George E. Hayden, . 


6 




Thomas H. Mahoney, 


Westfield, 






44-11, . 


Harry L. Nesmith, 


Westford, 


H. L. Nesmith, 


3 


148-22 and 148-23, 


Myron M. Clapp, 


Westhampton, . 






1-3, 


W. F. Neal, 


Westminster, 


G. A. Sargent, . 


6 


37 and 1392-M, 


B. R. Parker, 


Weston, 


E. P. Ripley, . 


2 


Waltham. 








1268-M, 


Christopher Borden, . 


Westport, 


Christopher Borden, . 


4 




Elmer E. Smith, 


Westwood, . 


Martin Sorenson, 


4 


185-M, 


Walter W. Pratt, 


Weymouth, 


C. L. Merritt, . 


4 






Whately, 


Rylan C. Howes, 


6 


349-W, 


C. H. Randall, . 


Whitman, . 


C. A. Randall, . 


5 


1-4, 


Henry I. Edson, 


Wilbraham, 


Henry I. Edson, 


6 




John Brown, 


Williamsburg, 






329-W, 


Wm. H. Davies, . 


Williamstown, 


Wm. H. Davies, 


6 


19-4, . 


Edwin L. Day, . 


Wilmington, 


Oliver McGrane, 


3 


102-4, . 


T. C. Flint, 


Winchendon, 


Waldo F. Streeter, . 


6 




David DeCourcy, 


Winchester, 


S. S. Symmes, . 


3 


201-12, 


Amos S. Ferry, . 


Windsor, 










Winthrop, . 


Harry Hills, 


1 




Frank Tracy, 


Woburn, 


Wm. Butler Jones, . 


3 


3922-M, Cedar, . 


W. N. Avery, 


Worcester, . 


Thos. E. Holland, . 


6 


10-22, . 


Chas. A. Kilbourn, 


Worthington, 






69 and 21-5, 


Geo. H. E. Mayshaw, . 


Wrentham, . 


Ernest B . Mayshaw, . 


4- 


2-2, Barnstable, . 


Henry R. Usher, 


Yarmouth, . 


Frank B. Homer, 


5 



>lic Document 



No. 73 



Ciie Commontocaltl) of ^assatbumts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



I0MMISSI0NER OF CONSERVATION 



STATE FORESTER 



Year ending November 30, 1921 



Department op Conservation 




boston ■ -- : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 
32 DERNE STREET 



Public Document 



No. 73 



Cfte Commontoealtf) of ^assatfjusctts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



COMMISSIONER OP CONSERVATION 



STATE FORESTER 



Year ending November 30, 1921 



.Department of Conservation 




BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 

C 



STATE LICRARY CF MflSSRCHUSETTS 

MAY 5 1922 
STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 

Mass Officiate 



Publication of this Document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration. 



IB 



Cfte Commontoealtj) of 99a$$acftu0ett0 



To Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

I respectfully present herewith for your consideration my 
second annual report as Commissioner of Conservation for the 
fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1921. 

WILLIAM A. L. BAZELEY. 



CONTENTS. 



Part I. 

Report of the Commissioner of Conservation. 

page 

Forestry 12 

Fish and Game 12 

Animal Industry 13 

Forest Fires 14 

State Forests . 14 

Standish Monument Reservation 17 

Conventions 17 

Lectures 18 

Foresters' Meetings 18 

Financial Statements: 

Purchase and Development of State Forests 19 

Maintenance of Nurseries 19 

Purchase of Mount Grace 20 

Maintenance of Standish Monument Reservation 20 

Recommendations for Legislation: 

Division of Forestry 21 

Division of Fisheries and Game 21 

Part II. 

Report of the Division of Forestry. 

New Legislation 29 

Organization 30 

State Plantations . 31 

Examinations 33 

Nursery Work 33 

Forest Surveys 35 

Ice Storm 35 

White Pine Blister Rust 36 

State Forests 36 

Report of State Fire Warden 40 

Report of Superintendent of Gypsy Moth Work 50 

General Conditions 50 

Summary of Conditions by Divisions 50 

Federal Work in Massachusetts 53 

Special North Shore Work 54 

Financial Statement 55 

Appendix. 

Financial Statement 59 

Summary of Town Expenditures and Reimbursements 61 

Distribution of Supplies 71 

Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests 72 

List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents 73 



OUTLINE OF REPORT. 



This report is divided for convenience and economy into 
four parts : — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of 

Conservation. 
Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 
Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 
Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume, as Public Docu- 
ment No. 73. 

Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document 
Xo. 25. 

Part IV is printed in a separate volume as Public Document 
Xo. 98. 



Part I 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CONSERVATION 



Cfte Commontoealti) of egassacftusettg 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF CONSERVATION. 



As the law prescribes the form of our annual report there 
can be but little variation in its style from year to year. The 
reports of accomplishment in each branch of the service were 
prepared by direction of the Commissioner by those in im- 
mediate charge of the various activities, and, while not treated 
with exhaustive detail, cover the more important facts and 
conclusions. 

The proper conservation of our natural resources in Massa- 
chusetts is a subject for deep thought and the exercise of our 
best judgment. Upon the success of such a policy depends the 
preservation as a heritage for future generations of the forests, 
wild life, and water resources, all of which, if judiciously and 
sensibly managed, will add much to the material prosperity of 
the entire State. 

The work of the three divisions of this Department has been 
vigorously prosecuted during the past year, yielding results 
which I firmly believe to be of immense value to the Common- 
wealth. I realize that this splendid progress could not have 
been accomplished without aid, and I desire to avail myself of 
this opportunity to express in heartiest fashion my acknowledg- 
ment of the generous support accorded me by the General 
Court, as well as the public in general. I desire especially to 
express my grateful appreciation of the work of the State 
House news service, which has from time to time given to the 
people of the Commonwealth, through the medium of the news- 
papers, information concerning important subjects with which 
this Department is dealing. 

Pursuant to the requirements of the act creating the Depart- 
ment of Conservation, the Commissioner, with the directors of 



12 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 

divisions acting as advisers, has determined all policies of a de- 
partmental nature. This has required the holding of twenty- 
one meetings during the year. 

Conservation of Our Forests. 
The late President Roosevelt, in an address made in 1903, 
said, "The forest problem is in many ways the most vital in- 
ternal problem before the American people to-day;" and again, 
"The more closely this statement is examined the more evident 
its truth becomes." Eighteen years have elapsed since the above 
utterance, and the importance of the problem has increased with 
each succeeding year. In Massachusetts forestry is a matter 
of immediate interest to every household, and I am happy to 
express the conviction that the splendid progress made in its 
promotion in our State is significant of a healthy growth of 
sentiment which has been created in large measure by the edu- 
cational work of this Department. While we have been engaged 
in the enterprise of reforestation only a comparatively brief 
time, we may point with pride and satisfaction to the gratifying 
dimensions already attained by the plantations which have been 
established throughout the State, and it requires only a continu- 
ation of the general interest which has been aroused along these 
lines to reclaim, beautify, and bring to a producing stage many 
thousands of acres now unsightly and unproductive. 

Conservation of Wild Life. 
The interdependence of forestry and fisheries and game has 
been forcibly illustrated during the past year by the successful 
operation of the fishway around the 30-foot dam which formed 
the first barrier to anadromous fish coming up the Merrimack 
river. This fishway was used by certain salt and fresh water 
species. By the installation of a fishway around the only re- 
maining structure, the Merrimack was opened from the New 
Hampshire line to the sea. History has repeated itself, and the 
Merrimack is once more a great fisheries highway as far as this 
State is concerned. From its shores have long since disap- 
peared the magnificent forests, but the hinterland still contains 
sufficient growths to insure a steady flow of water, though the 
spring and fall freshets are at times of terrific proportions. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



13 



The increase in wild life must go hand in hand with the in- 
crease of the forests. The rapidly increasing number of fisher- 
men and sportsmen demand redoubled efforts to increase the 
stock available for distribution. The fish will need a greater 
number of cold water brooks, the birds and game larger areas 
of properly forested land. 

The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game was greatly 
restricted owing to the lack of appropriations, especially as re- 
lates to the propagation of fish and game. Some of the usual 
activities ■ — as, for example, the collection of white perch, wall- 
eyed pike eggs, and some lobster work — had to be discontinued. 
However, the total volume of work compared very favorably 
with that of past years. 

To specify the work more in detail : ■ — 

Revenue turned into the general treasury (mostly fees for 
hunting and fishing licenses) was $113,263.11. 

Educational work was carried on as usual, including distribu- 
tion of laws, exhibitions at fairs, and upwards of seventy-five 
lectures with lantern slides and moving pictures. 

Three fish hatcheries, two rearing stations, three bird farms 
and two State-owned reservations were operated, with a pro- 
duction of approximately 1,923,471 fish and 6,144 birds. 

Work was continued in further organizing the newly created 
department of fish inspection. 

The law enforcement department handled more particularly 
difficult cases than usual, and disposed of 523 cases, being a 
large increase over previous records. 

Conservation of Domestic Animals. 
The function of the Division of Animal Industry is the con- 
servation of animal life by prevention, control, and eradication 
of contagious diseases to which domestic animals are suscep- 
tible. 

It is estimated that considerably more than one-third of the 
food consumed by the people of this country has for its source 
the domestic animal. In order that this source shall be opera- 
tive in the highest degree possible, it is necessary that the 
different species propagate in large numbers and rapidly de- 
velop to the point at which their products or their carcasses 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



become available as human food. Such propagation and de- 
velopment depend very largely upon the prevention of con- 
tagious disease among them, or its control and eradication when 
it has appeared. 

Domestic animals if maintained free from disease are not 
only valuable as producers of food by their products and car- 
casses, but are also recognized as vitally necessary to success- 
ful agriculture. Their by-products are the prime factors in 
many kinds of commercial trade. Horses are not only a means 
of recreation and pleasure to the people, but are indispensable 
and invaluable in the manufacture of many varieties of bio- 
logical products used in the preservation of human life. 

We refer to the accompanying report of the Director of Ani- 
mal Industry for a detailed description of the conservation 
activities of this Division. 

Forest Fires. 

As we have stated in previous reports, the greatest menace 
to our forests to-day is from fire. The waste in that particular 
depends entirely upon the precautions taken to avoid fires, and 
prompt action in putting them out when once started. To 
guard against this evil we are maintaining a fire-prevention 
system acknowledged to be the equal of any in the country. 
It is stated by those in a position to know that a very large 
proportion of the forest fires which occur in this Common- 
wealth is due to the carelessness of those who frequent the 
woods. To minimize this so far as possible we are constantly 
giving the subject widespread publicity in our efforts to a'rouse 
the public to a full realization of their duty. The complete 
record of the work accomplished along the line of fire prevention 
will be found in the report of the State Forester. 

State Forests. 
Pursuant to and in accordance with the provisions of the 
acts of the Legislature of 1920 and 1921, passed for the purpose 
of establishing and enlarging the State forests of the Common- 
wealth, there have been acquired during the fiscal year just 
ended a total area of 14,188 acres of land. The acquisition of 
this land in various sections of the State constitutes in part 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



15 



the creation of four new State forests, and also the addition of 
certain areas of land to State forests already established. The 
distribution of the land purchased during the year is as fol- 
lows: — 

Under Chapter 132, General Laws. 

Additions to already existing forests: Acres. 

Savoy Mountain State Forest 1,201 

Erving State Forest 651 

Conway State Forest 66 

Tolland State Forest 320 

Colrain State Forest 294 . 8 

New State forests: 

Wendell State Forest 2,124.2 

Sandwich State Forest 507 . 3 

Bear Mountain State Forest 5,174.0 



Under Chapter 344, Acts of 1921. 

New State forest: Acres. 

Mohawk Trail State Forest 3,256 

Under Chapter 606, Acts of 1920. 

Additional land : Acres. 

Mount Grace State Forest 595. 2 



The major portion of the above land acquired under Chapter 
132, General Laws, has been secured at a price of $4.50 per 
acre or under. Of the new State forests established under this 
act during the past year the one in Wendell comprises a portion 
of a larger tract of land situated in the townships of Wendell 
and Montague that is suitable in the main for no other purpose 
than that of producing forest trees. A large percentage of it is 
at present covered with a young growth of mixed hardwoods, 
and the remaining portions are sufficiently open for stocking 
with young trees of coniferous species. The tract is readily 
accessible at present, and can be made more so by clearing out 
certain abandoned roads which run through it. 

The Sandwich State Forest, situated partly in Sandwich and 
partly in Bourne, comprises a portion of a considerable tract of 
country in both townships which a long period of years has in- 
dicated will never be of value for any purpose other than tree 
production. It is situated in the vicinity of the Cape Cod 



16 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Canal, is readily accessible, and touches at one point on the 
main State highway leading down the Cape. The soil of the 
major portion of the tract is of a light, sandy nature, but it is 
of sufficient quality for the production of certain coniferous 
species. Scotch pines planted on a portion of the area a few 
years ago have made an excellent growth, and it is certain that, 
given the necessary protection from fire, this block of country 
can be made to produce in the necessary length of time a stand 
of forest trees that will be a real asset to the Commonwealth. 
The land thus far secured has cost $2 per acre, and additional 
land to the extent of 1,500 acres is contemplated for purchase. 

The Bear Mountain State Forest, situated in Great Barring- 
ton and Monterey, in southern Berkshire County, constitutes a 
rather rugged tract of land which, like much of the southern 
Berkshire region, is and always has been given over to the pro- 
duction of tree growth for wood-using purposes. It adjoins the 
Arthur Warton Swann State Forest, and comprises a portion of 
the former Pearson estate. 

Under the provisions of chapter 344, Acts of 1921, the pur- 
chase of land constituting the new Mohawk Trail State Forest 
was begun during August last, and up to the end of the fiscal 
year just ended land to the extent of 3,256 acres has been pur- 
chased, situated in the towns of Charlemont, Hawley, Florida, 
and Savoy. The land acquired lies on both sides of the trail, 
and extends for a distance of about five miles on either side of 
it between the junction of the Cold and Deerfield rivers and 
the village of Drury. It is a pleasure to report the acquisition 
of this new Mohawk Trail State Forest, for it means the assured 
preservation for all time of one of the most beautiful scenic 
sections of the now famous highway. A few small additional 
parcels of land will be added to that already acquired during 
1921, in order to properly complete the exterior boundaries of 
the Mohawk Trail State Forest. 

Under chapter 606, Acts of 1920, additional land has been 
acquired for the Mount Grace State Forest, bringing the present 
total area up to about 1,000 acres, which takes in the whole 
southern portion of the mountain, and extends for a short dis- 
tance across the roads around it both on the east and west 
sides. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



17 



The work of surveying acquired lands during the past year 
has progressed favorably, and at the present time about 95 
per cent of the boundary surveys have been completed. In 
addition, type data have been secured on portions of the lands 
acquired. Plans of the new forests are now being assembled, 
and should be ready by spring. 

Standish Monument Reservation. 

The renovations on the monument and reservation which 
were started during the fall of 1920 were continued this spring. 
The inside iron stairway was thoroughly overhauled and painted, 
new parts being substituted where necessary. A new cement 
walk was made around the monument and a cinder walk was 
made at the approach leading up to the monument. There 
were 1,700 common barberry (Berberis vulgaris) bushes planted 
on both sides of the approach. The road leading from the 
main highway through the reservation and to the monument 
was put in good condition, and the woodland on the hill was 
thinned over about 5 acres. A survey of the outside boundary 
lines was made and cement corner posts installed. 

An attendant in the employ of the State was stationed at 
the tower from May 26 to October 15, and during that period 
a record was kept of the visitors to the monument. The total 
number of visitors to the monument by automobile during this 
period was 34,370, the number of cars being 6,773. It was 
estimated that between 5,000 and 6,000 others visited the 
momument, making a total of approximately 40,000 visitors 
during the year. It is possible that this number is somewhat 
larger than the usual number each season, as the Plymouth 
Tercentenary celebration doubtless drew many visitors to Dux- 
bury. 

Conventions. 

The Commissioner has attended several meetings outside the 
State where questions of importance relating to forestry and 
fish and game protection were diseusse \ 

Association of State Foresters, Harrisburg, Pa., December 7 to 10. 
Society of American Foresters, New York City, N. Y., December 20. 
American Fish and Game Protective Association, New York City, X. Y., 
January 15. 



IS 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



Association of State Foresters. Chest ert own, X. Y., September 21. 
Society for Protection of New Hampshire Forests, North Woodstock, 

N. H., August 31. 
American Plant Pest Committee. Albany. N. Y., November 8. 

In addition there were several meetings in or near Boston, 
the most important of which was the meeting of the Now Eng- 
land Section, Society of American Foresters, held at Myles 
Standish State Forest. July 2$ to 30. This meeting is described 
in detail elsewhere in the report. 

Lectures. 

The Department has had an unusual number of application! 
for lectures. We have assembled a fair collection of colored 
slides with which to illustrate the talks, and have also a small 
portable lantern screen, so that we are equipped with a com- 
plete outfit for displaying them. Our lectures, which during 
the past year numbered nearly fifty, reach a large variety of 
people, including Boy Scouts, women's clubs, fish and game 
associations, schools, boards of trade, etc. So numerous have 
the calls for lectures become that they take much of the spare 
time of three of the forestry officials, the Commissioner, the 
secretary and the chief forester. 

It is also fitting to state here that a great deal of this work 
of lecturing is entirely voluntary on the part of our employees, 
as the talks are often given in the evening or at times outside 
the regular hours of work, and no extra pay is received for 
them. It is possible that if the demand continues a suitable 
fee will have to be charged or sufficient funds provided for an 
extra employee to take care of the work. 



Foresters' Meeting. 
At the invitation of the Commissioner the members of the 
New England Section, Society of American Foresters, met at 
the Myles Standish State Forest in Plymouth, July 28 to 30. 
Camping equipment and meals were supplied by the Common- 
wealth. The meeting was- well attended, almost the entire 
membership of sixty being present. The foresters were shown 
not only the details of management on one of our largest forests 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



19 



but also inspected our forest fire observation towers and fire 
apparatus in adjoining towns. The visitors seemed to go away 
with a high opinion of the work being done for forestry in 
Massachusetts. 



Financial Statement. 
Purchase and Development of State Forests. 
Receipts. 

Balance brought from 1920 $22,475 67 

Appropriation for 1921 175,000 00 



Expenditures. 

Services 

Travel 

Maps, photographs, etc. 

Land 

Equipment .... 

Supplies 

Contract planting and brushing 
Express and teaming . 
Sundries .... 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1921 



820,258 37 

5,929 96 

585 63 

96,347 74 

1,563 53 

2,332 57 

3,792 63 

601 40 

343 56 



8197,475 67 



131,755 39 



865,720 28 



Maintenance of Nurseries. 
Receipts. 

Appropriation for 1921 



825,000 00 



Expenditures. 



Services . 
Travel . . 
Equipment . 
Supplies . 

Express and teaming 
Seeds and seedlings 
Rent of land . 
Sundries 



$15,627 28 
194 81 
506 40 
1,030 47 
558 08 
750 69 
144 70 
28 95 



18,841 38 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1921 $6,158 62 



20 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION". [Jan. 

• 9 

Purchase of Mount Grace. 
Receipts. 

Balance brought from 1920 $29,750 00 

Appropriation for maintenance 1,000 00 

$30,750 00 

Expenditures. 

Services $2,373 88 

Travel 710 73 

Land 22,400 00 

Equipment 14 56 

Supplies . . . ... . . . . 402 38 

Teaming, etc 123 60 

Sundries 5 65 

26,030 80 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1921 $4,719 20 

Maintenance of Standi sh Monument Reservation. 
Receipts. 

Appropriation for 1921 $3,000 00 

Expenditures. 

Services , $1,652 39 

Travel 103 85 

Equipment 54 28 

Supplies 1,043 82 

Express, teaming, etc 58 06 

Sundries 81 02 

2,993 42 

" 

Balance returned to treasury Nov. 30, 1921 ... $6 58 

Recommendations for Legislation. 
The following recommendations of the Commissioner for 
legislative action have been forwarded to the Secretary of the 
Commonwealth, together with the drafts of the bills to cover 
the action, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 30, 
section 33, General Laws : ■ — 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



21 



Division of Forestry. 

Relative to Portable Sawmills. — We believe that the forest 
fire prevention system may be further strengthened by giving 
more attention to the portable sawmill. 

Statistics show that nearly 300 of these mills are in operation 
in Massachusetts each year, and that they are moved fre- 
quently from one location to another. For this reason we 
have not been able to get accurate knowledge of their location 
without involving considerable expense. We therefore recom- 
mend that all persons intending to operate portable sawmills 
shall first file their intention so to do with the Department of 
Conservation, stating the proposed location and the probable 
duration of the operation. We also urge the importance of 
having all slash and brush destroyed for a distance of at least 
150 feet from the mill. The Commissioner therefore recom- 
mends the passage of an act to accomplish this purpose. 

Division of Fisheries and Game. 

1. To allow the Governor to proclaim Temporary Close Seasons 
on Fish and Game. ■ — Occasionally it happens that because of 
climatic conditions, or because of a disease which may suddenly 
attack various species of fish and game, the continuance of an 
open season as prescribed by law might seriously deplete, if not 
exterminate, the species affected, and as this might occur at a 
time when the Legislature is not in session, it is expedient that 
the Governor be clothed with authority to set aside the open 
season. 

2. To allow Wardens and Deputy Wardens of this Division to 
enter upon and cross Private Property. — Under the new Revised 
Laws only the Director has the right to cross priva v property 
in the performance of his duties. If the wardens a. deputies 
do not have this authority their effectiveness is very much re- 
duced. When this Department was under the control of " com- 
missioners/' and the men were "deputy commission' he 
law could be interpreted to give them this right. 

3. To have the Fish and Game Law Amendments take Effect 
on January First of the Year following the Date of their Ena< t~ 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



ment. — It is desirable to get information of changes in the laws 
broadcast before attempting to enforce new laws, and as the 
news seems to travel slowly it would seem expedient to have 
the new laws go into effect on a certain date and thus give the 
public ample time to acquaint themselves with them. 

4. To have the Fishing License Law apply to All Inland Waters 
and to amend the Laws relative to the Issuance of Duplicate Cer- 
tificates and the Exportation of Game. ■ — The present law requires 
a license for fishing only in those inland waters which have been 
stocked by this Department since Jan. 1, 1910. The publica- 
tion yearly of lists of waters stocked during the year involves 
considerable expense. Further, by reason of the fact that many 
streams are known by various names, much confusion is created 
in the minds of persons who wish to determine whether a 
stream has or has not been stocked. Many of the unstocked 
waters are being depleted, and we believe they should be pro- 
tected by requiring licenses for fishing therein. 

A person wishing to secure a duplicate of a lost or destroyed 
license is required by the present law to apply, either in person 
or by letter, at the office of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 
This is an inconvenience to the public and creates a volume of 
work in the office of the Division at the busiest season of the 
year. An amendment permitting the issuance of duplicates by 
city and town clerks will remedy this, and the 25-cent fee will 
have the effect of reducing the number of licenses lost. 

Under the existing law there is no limit to the amount of fish 
or game which a non-resident may take out of the State under 
his license, except in the case of birds and brook trout. Inas- 
much as the Department is bending every effort to conserve 
the supply of wild life within the Commonwealth, it seems only 
just and fair that a limit be set. 

5. To permit the Issuance of Licenses to Certain Minors under 
Restrictions. • — There are many minors under fifteen, the age 
now established by law, who could be allowed to have permis- 
sion to hunt with firearms if accompanied by some one who 
could coach them along and prevent them from trying reckless 
stunts. The license would not be operative if they went out 
alone. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



23 



6. To allow N on- Resident Hunters the Right to attend Field 
Trials the Same as the Right noiv possessed for Fox-hunting 
Activities. — This is to take care of an oversight in the hunting 
license law and allow field trials which will not injure our game 
and thus not put a heavy burden on non-residents who are here 
for a few days only. 

7. To permit the Importation into Massachusetts of Fish and 
Game taken legally outside the Commonwealth and to permit Pos-- 
session of Such Fish and Game after the Close of the Season. — 
The present laws permit the taking of a bag limit of fish and 
game on the last day of the open seasons, but the person taking 
it cannot reasonably be expected to dispose of the same im- 
mediately. The accompanying act will give a reasonable length 
of time for the disposal of game and fish legally taken during 
the open season. It will also permit the importation and pos- 
session, after the close seasons in Massachusetts, of fish and 
game taken legally outside of the Commonwealth. 

8. To make the Laics of Massachusetts relative to Migratory 
Birds conform with the Laics of the United States. — The Federal 
government has entered into a treaty with Great Britain for 
the uniform protection of migratory birds on the American con- 
tinent. The Federal laws in this connection render conflicting 
State laws void. For the convenience of the public, and for 
the proper enforcement of the law it is desirable to have the 
laws of this Commonwealth conform with the Federal rules 
and regulations. 

9. To provide for Reports from Trappers to show to what Ex- 
tent they are commercializing the Fur-bearing Animals. — At the 
present time we have no way of estimating the number of fur- 
bearing animals in this Commonwealth. They are a valuable 
natural resource, and we should have information as to their 
abundance and value. 

10. To permit the Importation of Live Hares and Rabbits. — 
Our season is shorter than in other States, and many interested 
parties desire to purchase live hares and rabbits to stock our 
woods. Under the present law they must be imported and 
liberated during the open season, and they may be killed off 
immediately with no chance to propagate. It is surely no 



24 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



harm to bring them in during the close season to stock our 
covers if they have been legally taken in some other State. 

11. To prohibit the Use of Dogs during the Open Week on 
Deer. — Many dogs are taken into the woods during the deer 
week under the guise of hunting fox, raccoons, rabbits, etc. 
They are really used to help take the deer, but it is impossible 
to meet the situation under the present law. If all dogs are 
ruled out of the woods during the open week, the same as rifles 
are, the matter can be handled more fairly. 

12. To prohibit the Use of Snares. — The present law forbids 
the use of wire snares, but cord snares are just as deadly to 
dogs and game and also human beings. No snares of any sort 
should be allowed in the woods. 

13. To extend the Close Season on Quail in Certain Counties . — 
There are few quail left in these counties. While they have 
been protected during the past few years, and have shown an 
increase, it has not been sufficient to warrant an open season. 

14. To repeal the Salmon Laic on Lake Quinsigamond. — 
Under present laws the Commissioner of Conservation has the 
right to make rules and regulations for the taking of salmon, 
and there is no reason why they should not apply to this lake 
as well as all others. The situation which required a special 
law for that lake no longer exists. 

15. To regulate the Catching and Sale of Fresh-Water Fish. — 
Winter fisi^.ig and the absence of restriction on the sale of 
pond fish have been two of the principal causes of the depletion 
of inland fisheries during the past few years. Progressive con- 
servation demands that catch and sale limits be established. 

16. To extend the Close Season on Black Bass. — Bass are late 
spawners and need more time to carry eggs than other fish. 
They are easily caught in the late spring after hibernating and 
not eating during the winter. 

17. To establish the Authority of the State Inspector of Fish. — ■ 
The original act imposed certain restrictive measures on the 
sale of fish, but it contains no definite statement as to the au- 
thority of the inspector or his deputies to enforce the provisions 
of these sections. 

18. To amend Certain Sections of Chapter Ninety-four of the 
General Laics. — It is advisable to change the wording in a few 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



25 



places so that the provisions will be clearly understood and no 
inconsistent statements be contained therein. 

19. To allow the Commissioner of Conservation to sell Certain 
Lands and Buildings in the Towns of Palmer and Wilbraham. — 
It seems advisable to either turn over to some other State de- 
partment or to restore as taxable property certain parts of the 
Palmer fish hatchery and the Wilbraham game farm as appear 
to be no longer needed for maintaining operations at these two 
stations. 



Paet II 



KEPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY. 



The Division of Forestry continued throughout the year to 
give earnest attention to the important matters with the ad- 
ministration of which it is charged by the General Laws. The 
more important of these activities include giving aid and advice 
to landowners of the Commonwealth with respect to the proper 
management of their forest lands, for which service they are 
required to pay only the traveling expenses of the expert mak- 
ing the examination; the development and care of demonstra- 
tion forest plantations under the so-called reforestation act; 
the production and distribution of young forest trees from the 
nurseries established and maintained by this Division; the sup- 
pression of the gypsy and brown-tail moths; the operation of a 
forest fire prevention system; and the planting and manage- 
ment of the lands acquired for State forests. 

All of the above activities are described in detail on other 
pages of this report. 

New Legislation. 
In pursuance of the recommendations of last year's report 
the following new legislation was enacted by the General Court 
of 1921. 

The forest warden appointment law was amended so that the 
State Forester may appoint the forest warden upon the failure 
of the mayor or selectmen so to do after proper notice. 

The law allowing the State to reimburse towns for purchase of 
fire fighting equipment was also amended so that the towns 
which may be reimbursed for this purchase may also be reim- 
bursed for expense of replacing this equipment. 

The so-called reforestation act (section 10, chapter 132, Gen- 
eral Laws) was also amended, giving the owner when land is 
reconveyed the privilege of cutting trees less than eight inches 
in diameter if the State Forester so determines. 

The act relative to reimbursement of towns for loss of taxes 
on land used for State forests was also amended. 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



An act authorizing the Governor to proclaim a close season 
for game in time of drought was also passed. 

Legislation exempting foresters, assistant foresters, engineers, 
surveyors, forest fire observers and foremen employed tempo- 
rarily in the purchase and development of the State forests 
was enacted in the form of an amendment to section 33 of 
chapter 132 of the General Laws. 

Organization. 

During the year 1921 the personnel of the Division has re- 
mained practically unchanged. Several temporary surveyors 
and draftsmen have been employed on the State forests; as far 
as possible local surveyors have been employed, as these men 
are more familiar with the ground and can therefore do more 
economical work. 

The present organization, Nov. 30, 1921, is as follows: — 



William A. L. Bazeley 



Charles O. Bailey 
Elizabeth Hubbard . 
Elizabeth T. Harraghy 
Jennie D. Kenyon 
Mabel R. Hamnett 
Dorothy J. Sanford . 



Harold O. Cook 
Frank L. Haynes 
James Morris 
Robert B. Parmenter 
John A. Palmer . 
Fred W. Parker 
Eben Smith 



George A. Smith 
Francis V. Learoyd 



1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly. 

2. William A. Hatch, Marlborough. 

3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill. 



Commissioner and State Forester. 



)her. 
clerk. 



Chief forester. 

Assistant forester. 

Assistant forester. 

Assistant forester. 

Superintendent, Amherst Nursery. 

Superintendent, Bridgewater Nursery. 

Superintendent, Barnstable Nursery. 



4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Fox- 

borough. 

5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzard's Bay. 

6. Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester. 



Forestry Division. 

General Staff. 

Secretary. 
Senior cle 
Stenograp 
Stenograp 
Clerk. 
Assistant 



General Forestry. 



Moth Work. 

. Superintendent. 
. Business agent. 



District Moth Men. 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 31 



Forest Fire Prevention. 
Maxwell C. Hutchins . . . State Fire Warden. 
Josepha L. Gallagher . . . Clerk. 



District 

1. James E. Moloy, Woburn. 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River. 

3. Joseph J. Shepherd, Pembroke. 



Fire Wardens. 

4. John P. Crowe, Westborough. 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield. 

6. Joseph L. Peabody, Winchendon. 



Observers and Locc 
Mrs. John Condon, Harwich. 
Joseph W. Jenkins, Barnstable. 
Mrs. W. I. Moody, Falmouth. 
W. F. Raymond, Bourne. 
F. L. Buckingham, Kingston. 
Mrs. Allen Keniston, Martha's Vine- 
yard. 

S. Edward Matthews, Middleborough. 
George F. Moffett, Fall River. 
Everett Short, Rehoboth. 
Charles F. Kimball, Hanson. 
Edward D. Sprague, Hingham. 
F. J. Kustenmacher, Sharon. 
Fred R. Stone, Sudbury. 
William H. Tyzzer, Jr., Wakefield. 
C. E. Blood, Chelmsford. 
Leon S. Gifford, Georgetown. 
Caplis McCormack, Manchester. 
John F. Mulcahy, Mendon. 



m of Fire Towers. 

William E. Howarth, Westborough. 
James W. Maley, Wachusett Mountain. 
Mark W. Shattuck, Watatic Mountain. 
Fred A. Lincoln, Warwick. 
Harland Burrows, Pelham. 
Mary E. Haley, Brimfield. 
Thomas Magovern, Charlton. 
N. C. Woodward, Shelburne Falls. 
H. H. Fitzroy, Savoy. 
David M. Smith, Waltham. 
Frank Wilson, Chester. 
John E. Curtin, Tolland. 
Frederick K. Shears, Mount Everett. 
Robert Miller, Lenox. 
Harry George, Williamstown. 
Alton B. Ellis, Acushnet. 
Alva Sikes, West Brookfield. 
Eugene Sullivan, Agawam. 
William H. St. John, Harvard. 



State Plantations. 
Reforestation. 

About two-thirds of the plantations under our management 
were examined during the year, and the majority show satis- 
factory results. Our method of cutting around the individual 
tree to free it from brush is a decided improvement over former 
clean brushing methods, and more work has been done at a 
decidedly lower cost per acre, while the results are more satis- 
factory. Twenty-eight lots containing a total of 732 acres 
were brushed at an average cost of about S2.50 per acre. 
Seven new lots were planted and two other lots which had 
been partly burned over were restocked. 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



Planting. 



[W. p.=white pine; r. p 


=red pine; S. p.=Scotch pine; J. p. = Jack 
hemlock.] 


pine; sp. 


= spruce; hem.=» 


Lot. 


Town. 


Area 
(Acres). 


Trees. 


Greenwood 






80 


2,000 w. p. 








15 


10,000 w. p. 


Robertson (2) 




Barre 


100 


50,000 w. p. 
10,000 r. p. 








75 


20,000 w. p. 
15,000 r. p. 
10,000 S. p. 
5,000 J. p. 

1 AAA 

1,000 sp. 
500 hem. 








40 


12,700 w. p. 
2,500 S. p. 
2,225 J. p. 
4,500 sp. 
200 r. p. 








70 


50,000 w. p. 








4 


5,000 w. p. 



Brushing. 



Lot. 


Town. 


Area 
(Acres). 


Brusfcfed 
(Acres). 


Lawrence 


Ashburnham .... 


63 


63 


Rockwood (2) 


Ashburnham .... 


130 


20 


Smith (2) 


Ashburnham .... 


160 


48 


Brochu 


Attleboro 


25 


25 


Robertson (2) 


Barre . ... . . . 


100 


55 


Stone 


Brookfield 


37 


30 


Dewar 


Carlisle 


40 


40 


Greenwood 


Gardner 


80 


40 


French (2) 


Lancaster 


83 


83 


Civic League . ■% • . 


Nantucket .... 


133 


86 


Spencer (2) 


Oakham 


134 


30 


Hastings 


Orange 


11 


11 


Dean 


Rutland 


55 


35 


French 


Rutland 


26 


26 


Baker-Hurd (2) . 


Rutland-Barre .... 


132 


30 


Schoonmaker .... 


South Ashburnham . 


38 


38 


Putnam 


Spencer 


8 


8 


Rice (3) 


Spencer 


200 


25 


Lynde 


Westminster .... 


39 


39 


Total 






732 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 33 

Examinations. 

The examinations of private woodlands total 60, which is a 
few less than last year. 

It is interesting to note how business conditions affect the 
kind of examinations made. The year 1920 was a prosperous 
one in the lumbering business, so that a majority of our clients 
wished for an estimate of the value of their woodlands and ad- 
vice on their sale and operation. The year 1921 was a poor 
one in the lumbering industry, and requests for advice along 
these lines were few. 



Subject. 


Number of 
Examinations. 


Area (Acres). 






1 


60 














18 


205 






15 


961 






10 


306 






2 


138 






J .£ . . 


247 


Thinning and planting 




7 


554 


Totals . 





61 


2,471 



Nurseries. 

During the spring of 1920 there were shipped from our nurs- 
eries approximately 2,290,000 trees. This total is a little lower 
than was expected, due in part to the severe weather conditions 
of the previous winter. However, more than 90 per cent of the 
inventoried number came through in good condition, so that 
the result may be considered very satisfactory. 

One innovation may be noted. For some time past there 
has been an increased demand from cities and towns for plant- 
ing stock. This year the Commissioner of Conservation, feeling 
that some of the stock might be given away and still enough 
would be left to fill the State reforestation program, obtained 
the consent of the Governor and Council to furnish cities and 
towns with trees free of cost. All municipalities within the 
Commonwealth owning their water systems were notified, and 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



more than 40 of them took advantage of the offer, receiving a 
total of 626,000 trees. The following table shows the distribu- 
tion of all trees from our nurseries: — 





State 
Forests. 


Refor- 
estation. 


Cities 

and 
Towns. 


State 
Institu- 
tions. 


Private 
Planting. 


Total. 


White pine 
Scotch pine 
Scotch pine (3-year) . 
Red pine .... 
Jack pine .... 
Spruce .... 
Hemlock .... 
Larch .... 


650,000 
108,000 
48,000 
24,000 
76,000 
82,000 


149,700 
12,500 

25,200 
7,225 
5,500 
500 


505,000 
87,000 

10,000 
20,000 
4,000 


264,000 
65,000 

35,000 
5,000 
7,000 


60,500 
7,000 

10,500 
1,000 
14,250 

6,550 


1,629,200 
279,500 
48,000 
104,700 
109,225 
112,750 
500 
6,550 


Totals .... 


988,000 


200,625 


626,000 


376,000 


99,800 


2,290,425 





Our nurseries are being built up to meet the increased de- 
mand of our own needs, and within two years we expect to 
have at least 20,000,000 trees of various age classes, allowing 
an annual output of about 4,000,000 four-year transplants. At 
the present time the nurseries contain about 10,000,000 trees, 
including all age classes. 

Four acres of land have been added to the Amherst nursery 
and about five to the State Farm nursery, allowing room for 
an additional 2,125,000 transplants. Arrangements have been 
made at the Myles Standish Forest, the Swann Forest, the 
Otter River Forest and the Savoy Mountain Forest for the 
establishment of transplant nurseries to carry about 2,000,000 
two-year trees. This stock will be allowed to stand for one or 
two years and then will be set out directly on the reservations, 
thereby effecting a considerable saving in expressage, because 
about 40,000 seedlings can be shipped from the main nurseries 
at about the same cost as 3,000 four-year transplants. All of 
these transplant nurseries will be large enough to permit of 
economically employing one or more men during the summer 
months. 

Several hundred new seed frames have been built to take 
care of the proposed increase in the number of seedlings, and 
in addition to alterations in the Amherst nursery buildings we 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



35 



have almost completed the installation of a new water system 
consisting of pump, tower-tank and pipe lines, and also the re- 
modeling of housing facilities at the State Farm nursery. 

Forest Survey. 

The work of obtaining a complete survey of woodland condi- 
tions in the State was continued during the past summer and 
the forest survey of Hampshire County was completed. The 
report is nearly ready for publication. We have now detailed 
forest surveys of three counties, — Worcester, Plymouth and 
Hampshire. Norfolk County is partially completed and will 
be finished this summer. 

It is impossible to plan an adequate forest policy for the 
State unless one knows not only the forest area of the State, 
as compared with the agriculture, but also the proportions of 
different types and age classes in the forest. It is this infor- 
mation that these county surveys are designed to supply. 

Ice Storm. 

The last days of our fiscal year were made noteworthy by 
the occurrence of the ice or glaze storm. Nothing of the kind 
has happened before in the lifetime of living men or living 
trees. The storm coated both shade and forest trees with 
hundreds of pounds of ice, and the weight snapped off huge 
branches and tops of trees, filling the streets and woodlands 
with debris, spoiling the symmetry and form of all trees, and 
injuring many beyond the possibility of repair. Naturally the 
first concern was felt for the shade trees, and this brought into 
our office an avalanche of appeals for advice and help. Al- 
though this Department legally and officially has nothing to do 
with the care of shade trees we did our best to meet the situa- 
tion. Articles were issued to the press, a short, comprehensive 
bulletin published, lectures given before public meetings, and 
the local tree wardens were called together for conference and 
instructions. The principal message to the people was to the 
effect that the repair of the damage was something that would 
take years; that beyond the clearing of the debris haste was 
not necessary; and that all permanent repair work should be 
carefully planned. 



36 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



In behalf of the tree wardens it should be said that they met 
the serious situation well. These officials work along from 
year to year on meager appropriations, and have no permanent 
force of men except in those towns where they are also gypsy- 
moth superintendents, and very little equipment. Suddenly 
they were called upon to handle a big job, and they were equal 
to the occasion. It is hoped that in the future their fellow 
citizens will have a higher appreciation of the importance of 
these officials and will be more liberal with the appropriations 
for shade-tree work. 

White Pine Blister Rust. 

The work of checking the spread of this disease is placed in 
the Plant Pest Division of the Department of Agriculture by 
the Legislature, so that our interest in it is more or less aca- 
demic, although vital. Recent indications are that the disease is 
far more widespread than was at first supposed, and that it is 
absolutely essential that cultivated and wild ribes be eradicated 
from the near vicinity of white pines if they are to be saved. 

In co-operation with the State Department of Agriculture 
ribes eradication was completed on the Otter River State For- 
est, and some preliminary scouting work done on other State 
forests to determine the presence of ribes. We plan to start on 
a thorough campaign of ribes eradication all over our State 
forests this summer, provided that sufficient funds are made 
available. 

State Forests. 
More than the usual amount of work has been done this year 
on the State forests owing to our being able to secure sufficient 
help at a rate of wage commensurate with the nature of the 
work. This work has been confined mostly to the cutting and 
burning of brush and opening up of old abandoned roads, which 
is necessary in most of these forests in order that they may re- 
ceive better fire protection and be made accessible for fire 
fighting equipment, planting stock and crews. Several new 
tracts have been purchased and new State forests created 
located largely throughout the central and western portions 
of the State. The following is a report of the general work 
carried on in each forest:- — 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



37 



Myles Standish Forest. 

The brush has been cut and burned on about 20 miles of 
highway, which includes the two roads leading from the super- 
intendent's house to College Pond, and also Halfway Pond 
Road. About 12 miles of fire lines were brushed and plowed 
25 feet wide along the southern and eastern boundary of the 
reservation. The Federal Pond Road, w r hich lies west of Col- 
lege Pond, and which has not been used for twenty-five years, 
has been cut out and the brush burned, thereby giving us access 
to about 2,500 acres of land. 

Several camp sites have been leased and one new camp 
erected on College Pond. Three new camps are partially com- 
pleted, one each on Widgeon, Rocky and Clew ponds. A tele- 
phone line was built from the superintendent's house to College 
Pond, a distance of 3 miles, which is very necessary in case of 
a fire on the reservation or during planting season, when we 
are employing several men on that end of the forest. Several 
miles of highway have been repaired, making the reservation 
more accessible to automobilists. A new cement foundation 
was constructed under the superintendent's house in order that 
this might be used through the entire year. Two hundred and 
eighty-five thousand seedlings were planted on the reservation 
at a cost of $10.73 per thousand. 

Savoy State Forest. 
About 12 miles of brush have been cut and disposed of and 
4^ miles of road repaired. One hundred and thirty thousand 
trees were planted on this reservation at a cost of $6.72 per 
thousand. 

Otter River State Forest. 
The brush on about 12 miles of boundary line, roadway and 
fire lines has been cut and burned. A large amount of ditch- 
ing was done in order to dry out the old abandoned railroad 
bed, making it suitable for use as a road and at the same time 
as a fire line. The barn was repaired by installing new sills 
and planking the floors, and exterior and interior repairs were 
made on the house. A telephone line was built connecting the 
reservation house with the New England Telephone and Tele- 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



graph Company's line. Twelve acres of brush were cut and 
burned preparatory to spring planting. A new bridge was 
constructed across Otter River, and a trail cut to King Philip's 
Rock. Two hundred and thirty-seven thousand trees were 
planted at a cost of $9.89 per thousand. 

Mount Grace State Forest. 
One-half mile of road was built at the base of the mountain. 
Twenty-four acres of brush were cut, releasing the young pine. 
A lean-to or open-air camp, 8 J by 12 feet, was constructed at 
the summit of Mount Grace, and the Weeks house and barn 
were partially repaired so that they might be suitable for sur- 
vey crews to use while working in that locality. 

Conway State Forest. 
Three and one-half miles of road were repaired on this reser- 
vation and 100,000 trees were planted at a cost of $11.20 per 
thousand. 

Wendell State Forest. 
Four miles of road were cleared and the brush piled ready 
for burning. Two new bridges were constructed to replace 
the old ones that were unusable. 

Erving State Forest. 
The road leading from the main highway to Laurel Lake 
was brushed and burned to a width of 45 feet. A 40-acre tract 
was prepared for spring planting by cutting and disposing of 
the brush. Thirty thousand trees were planted at a cost of 
$10.65 per thousand. 

Stvann Forest. 

Three miles of wood road were brushed and burned. A 
60-foot bridge was replanked and considerable work done on 
the buildings. Seventy-nine thousand three hundred trees 
were planted at a cost of $7.80 per thousand. 

Tolland State Forest. 
Eleven and one-half miles of road and trail have been brushed 
out and burned. One foot bridge and one wagon bridge were 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



39 



constructed. The McGrannis house was put in condition for 
housing men during the spring tree planting, and later in the 
fall was further repaired and painted. One hundred and three 
thousand, eight hundred trees, were planted at a cost of $13.62 
per thousand. 

Col rain State Forest. 
Two hundred thousand trees were planted at a cost of $18 
per thousand, which included the cost of the trees. This work 
was done by the Franklin Forestry Company, who were able 
to plant and furnish trees at this low price, as they had a sur- 
plus in their nursery, situated near by in the town of Colrain. 
They also did some necessary brush cutting at a contract price. 

Harold Parker State Forest. 
Thirty thousand trees were planted at a cost of $9.57 per 
thousand. 



The present area of the State forests to date, Nov. 30, 1921, 
is given in tabular form below: — 



Name of Forest. 


Acreage. 


Arthur Warton Swann State Forest 




986.75 


Bear Mountain State Forest 




5,174.00 


Colrain State Forest 


{ 


501.001 
294.80 


Conway State Forest . 




666.00 


Erving State Forest 




1.595.40 


Harold Parker State Forest 




1,222.60 


Mohawk Trail State Forest 




3,281.00 


Mount Grace State Forest 




994.375 


Myles Standish State Forest 




7,464.00 


Otter River State Forest 




1,720.75 


Sandwich State Forest 




507.34 


Savoy Mountain State Forest 




3,998.90 


Tolland State Forest 




2,925.00 


Wendell State Forest 




2,124.27 


Total 




33,456.185 



1 This acreage was acquired under the so-called reforestation act, section 10, chapter 132, General 
Laws. 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan, 



This total acreage of 33,456.185 has been purchased at a 
total cost of $207,287.43. Of this amount $42,650 has been 
expended on the purchase of Mount Grace and $50,625 on the 
purchase of the Mohawk Trail, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of chapter 344, Acts of 1921, and chapter 606, Acts of 
1920. 

REPORT OF THE STATE FIRE WARDEN. 
Mr. W. A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with your request, and in accord with 
the provisions of section 28, chapter 48 of the General Laws, I 
beg to submit the following report of the work accomplished by 
this branch of the Division this year. 

With the exception of the extreme drought throughout the 
spring months, and the short drought preceding the hunting 
period, the season has been a comparatively favorable one. 

With very little snow during the preceding winter, fires started 
early in March, necessitating the opening of our observation sta- 
tions nearly three weeks in advance of former years. Very little 
rain had fallen during this period until about May 25. This 
condition, together with the high March and April winds, made 
ideal conditions for forest fires, and we feel that we are extremely 
fortunate in holding our loss at a low mark as compared with 
losses sustained in other New England States. 

With practically no rain for a month before the opening of the 
hunting season October 18, and with reports coming in from 
over the entire State requesting the closing of the hunting season, 
the matter was called to the attention of the Governor, and the 
following statement was issued by him: — 

Commissioner of Conservation Bazeley has received reports from the 
game wardens throughout the Commonwealth. Without exception they 
believe that unless the open season on upland shooting is suspended there 
is the gravest danger of forest fires. However, there are no large fires 
raging to-day, and Governor Cox has decided not to interfere with the 
open season at present. He urges all hunters to use extreme care in pre- 
venting fires, and has announced that if any considerable number of forest 
fires are started, even on the first open day, he will then be obliged to 
suspend the season on all shooting until after drenching rains have fallen. 

With a heavy downpour of rain the night before the opening, 
and with occasional rains throughout the following weeks, to- 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



41 



gether with the hearty co-operation of the hunters, no severe 
fires were experienced. 

The most disastrous fire of the season was a New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad fire, which occurred in Medfield, 
May 21, burning over about 1,500 acres and causing a damage 
exceeding $20,000. This fire was fanned by a 50-mile gale, which 
made it almost impossible to extinguish. 

The transferring to this branch of the Division of all State 
forests acquired by the Department has necessar'ly increased the 
duties of the district forest wardens, as all State lands within 
their districts are placed under their immediate supervision. As 
most of the new purchases were confined to the northern and 
western parts of the State, it was found necessary to divide dis- 
tricts 4 and 5, creating a new district including the northern 
part of Worcester County and all of Franklin County. Mr. 
Joseph L. Peabody of Winchendon, who has been associated 
with this Department for a number of years as caretaker of the 
Otter River Reservation, was appointed district forest warden of 
this district. No other changes have been made in the districts, 
but as additional lands are acquired, it will probably become 
necessary to reduce the size of some of the other districts. 

Under date of May 14, Governor Cox issued the following 
proclamation, setting apart the week of May 22 to 28 as forest 
protection week: — 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
By His Excellency Channing H. Cox, Governor. 

A PROCLAMATION. 
Forest Protection and Fire Prevention Week. 

The President of the United States has asked the various States of the 
Union to observe the week of May 22-28, 1921, as Forest Protection 
Week, and has requested citizens generally to observe this week in such 
a manner as may call public attention to the tremendous and unneces- 
sary waste caused by forest fires and the need for definite, well-planned 
action that may materially reduce the annual loss from this cause. 

On May 15 the total loss from forest fires in this Commonwealth alone 
had been over sixty-two thousand dollars, which is in excess of the total 
loss for the whole of the previous year. Not only is there a waste of tim- 
ber, but hundreds of wild birds and animals are destroyed in every such 
fire. 

Therefore I recommend that the citizens of every community make 
individual and collective effort this year to prevent forest fires, to the 



42 



DEPARTMENT. OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



end that we may protect the timber, the wild life and the natural scenery 
of Massachusetts. 

Given at the Executive Chamber, in Boston, this fourteenth day of 
Ma}', in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty- 
one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one 
hundred and forty-fifth. 

Chan ning H. Cox. 

By His Excellency the Governor. 

Frederick W. Cook, 
Secretary of the Commonwealth, 

At this time 5,000 copies of a bulletin entitled "Safeguarding 
America Against Fire" were sent out over the entire State. In 
addition to this, nearly 1,000 Boy Scouts throughout the State 
responded to an invitation extended by the Commissioner and 
visited the observation towers in their localities Saturday, May 28. 
There they learned what Massachusetts is doing to lessen the 
damage caused by forest fires. At each station speakers were 
provided, giving the boys a talk on fire prevention. 

During the months of February and March, forest fire confer- 
ences were held at Middleborough, Boston, Worcester, Green- 
field, Springfield and Pittsfield. Forest wardens, selectmen, 
railroad officials and Boy Scouts executives attended these meet- 
ings. The conferences were very instructive and a great deal of 
interest was shown. Every railroad was represented, having 
from six to twelve men in attendance, covering every branch of 
their work bearing on railroad fires. Through the courtesy of 
Mr. E. A. Ryder of the Boston & Maine Railroad, a model loco- 
motive w r as loaned us for use at each meeting. Mechanics in 
attendance at the different meetings explained the construction 
and workings of the spark arrester and ash pan; also the travel 
of a cinder from the time it leaves the fire box until it goes 
out of the stack, showing the importance of keeping the spark 
arresters and ash pans in perfect condition. 

The Boy Scout movement as an aid to fire prevention was a 
very interesting topic, and it is pleasing to know that to-day 
Boy Scouts, as well as many other boys throughout the State, 
are being instructed by chiefs of fire departments and forest 
wardens in the method of charging and using fire extinguishers, 
and methods used in controlling forest fires. 

Commissioner Bazeley gave a very interesting talk at each 
meeting on the " State Forest Policy," and told of the imperative 



J 




Fire observation tower on Oak Hill, Harvard; built in 1921. It completes our system 

of forty stations. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



43 



need of taking steps to insure the future timber supply of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Mr. William C. Adams, Director of Fisheries and Game, gave 
a word of warning relative to the depletion of wild life by 
forest fires, bringing out the importance of protecting our wood- 
lands from fire if we are to perpetuate the bird life of the 
State. 

Many interesting discussions were held on ways and means of 
controlling fires, the enforcement of the slash law, and other mat- 
ters pertaining to the enforcement of the fire laws. 

A large amount of construction, repairs, painting and telephone 
work has been done by our district men and observers this season. 
Fourteen of our stations were repainted, new telephone lines 
were installed in six stations where it was necessary to erect new 
poles, and the old telephone lines were thoroughly repaired at 
twelve stations. 

A new 70-foot tower was erected at the summit of Oak Hill in 
the town of Harvard. This will undoubtedly prove to be one of 
the most important stations we have, overlooking vast forested 
areas that we have been unable to protect by other stations. 
Several towns receiving protection from this tower contributed 
$1,350 towards the purchase price. 

We have maintained 39 observation towers this year, and the 
observers are entitled to a great deal of credit for the promptness 
and accuracy shown in locating and reporting fires. More than 
24,000 people have visited these stations during the season, com- 
ing from nearly every State in the Union and from many foreign 
countries. The trails leading to the towers have been cleaned 
and improved, thereby making the climb to the summit of the 
mountains much easier. 

At the Mount Grace Station, in the town of Warwick, an 
open camp, 8| by 12 feet, was constructed, and a stone and 
cement fireplace will be built in front of it as soon as weather 
conditions will allow in the spring. We anticipate that this camp 
and fireplace will be used a great deal by campers, and is the 
starting of a system of camps and fireplaces to be built at many 
of our stations. 

An extra effort has been made this year to enforce the slash 
law. Our district men have devoted a large part of their time 
to this, and in most instances have met with prompt action on 
the part of the lumber and wood operators. The officials repre- 
senting power lines and telephone companies have co-operated 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



with us, and many miles of their lines have been cleaned and the 
brush burned. A few town officials who have charge of roadside 
cutting have not been as active in carrying out the provisions of 
this law as we would desire, owing in some instances to the town 
finances, and in other cases to indifference on the part of the 
men having the immediate charge of the work, but the majority 
of towns have done exceptionally fine work in removing their 
brush and disposing of it. 

Upon the request of Forester P. W. Ayers of the Society for 
the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, assistance was sent to 
Randolph, N. H., October 10, to aid in the extinguishing of a 
fire burning over the northern slope of Mount Madison. Dis- 
trict Forest Wardens Crowe and Montle, with one of our large 
gasolene pumps and 750 feet of hose, arrived there at 3 a.m. 
the following day, and remained two days, when they returned, 
leaving the pump and equipment there for use. This pump 
proved very effective in holding the fire within the above area. 

One of the unfortunate conditions we have always had to con- 
tend with is the allowing of portable sawmill operators the privi- 
lege of operating throughout the State without any restrictions 
whatever, and without any knowledge of when and where they 
are to operate. During the year we have had more than 260 of 
them in operation scattered over the entire State. Most of their 
operations are small, a matter of possibly four or five weeks, and 
then they move to other fields. Many of the operators come from 
adjoining States, complete their jobs and return, with absolutely 
no respect for the slash or spark arrester laws. As we have no 
means of knowing the location of any of their operations without 
going to considerable State expense, it seems advisable and for 
the best interests of the Commonwealth that the present portable 
sawmill act be amended, requiring all operators to file with this 
Department a statement setting forth when and where they are 
to operate, and also requiring them to dispose of all brush and 
slash within a certain distance of their mill locations. This 
would enable us to get in touch with them before their operations 
w r ere commenced, and make sure that all laws relative to fire 
prevention were to be complied with. We would also be in a 
position to answer a large number of inquiries made by small 
timberland owners relative to the location of a mill in the vicin- 
ity of their woodlands, thus giving them an opportunity to dis- 
pose of their mature timber before the removal of the mill. This 
would also furnish additional business for the sawmills. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



45 



The permit law, which requires the procuring of a permit from 
the forest warden for starting open-air fires, has been very well 
observed, and more than 28,000 permits have been issued. While 
we have had some violations, they have in most cases come from 
lack of familiarity with the law. Fifteen persons have been 
convicted and fined and 73 persons have settled by paying the 
cost of extinguishment. One person was convicted for operating 
a portable sawmill without a screen. 

The railroad fire situation, as far as it relates to the Boston & 
Albany and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroads, 
does not show any decided improvement over previous years. In 
fact, these two roads have set more fires this year than in any 
previous year during a period of ten years. The following table 
gives a comparison of mileage, the number of locomotives in use, 
and the number of fires: — 



Railroad. 


Mileage. 


Number of 
Locomotives. 


Number of 
Fires. 


New York, New Haven & Hartford 


1,883 


922 


471 


Boston & Albany 


979 


354 


292 


Boston & Maine 


2,017 


1,025 


95 




71 


23 


4 



The above table shows that the Boston & Maine railroad, 
with the greatest number of locomotives, has caused but 95 fires, 
as compared with 471 by the New York, New Haven & Hartford, 
and 292 by the Boston & Albany. The reason for this marked 
improvement by the Boston & Maine is because they have made 
a special study of the railroad fire problem. They have kept 
their rights of way, and in many instances lands adjoining their 
rights of way, free from all inflammable material, and locomotives 
are not allowed to leave their yards or roundhouses unless they 
are in perfect condition. The Central Vermont Road, which at 
one time set as many as 65 fires on their short line, have prac- 
tically eliminated them. This is due without doubt to their 
having to file with the Department of Public Utilities a report 
of the condition of every locomotive they operate in this State, 
and no locomotives are allowed to operate unless they are in per- 
fect condition. 

The enormous number of fires set by the Boston & Albany and 
by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroads can be attrib- 



46 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



uted to the fact that the officials of these roads do not make a 
careful study of their rights of way conditions, and allow locomo- 
tives to operate that should be in the shops for repairs. The fact 
is, they have no real fire preventive system. The mechanical 
department is responsible for the setting of the fires, and the claim 
department is responsible for the settling of fire claims, no united 
effort being made to ascertain the exact cause and then remedy 
it. The Department of Public Utilities and this Department 
have made over 4,000 special examinations of front ends and ash 
pans of locomotives of these two roads this year, and have found 
many defects which should have been discovered by the railroad 
employees and not by an employee of any State department. 

For the past ten years this Department has co-operated with 
the railroads to the fullest possible extent in endeavoring to re- 
duce the number of railroad fires, and the results accomplished 
are far from satisfactory. If the railroads are to allow such con- 
ditions to exist, there seems to be but one alternative, and that 
is to enact additional laws which would require a daily inspection 
of all front ends and ash pans of every locomotive in operation 
throughout forested .areas; also, to require the patrolling of their 
right of way in such locations and at such times as designated by 
this Department, with a heavy penalty for the violation of any 
of the railroad forest fire laws. 

Our records show that we have had 862 railroad fires, — the 
Boston & Albany, 292; the Boston & Maine, 95; the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford, 471; and the Central Vermont, 4. 
These fires burned over an area of 5,711 acres, with a cost to 
extinguish of $9,331, and a property loss of $40,531. 

Twenty towns have purchased additional forest fire fighting 
equipment, taking advantage of the reimbursement act, which 
provides for the reimbursement to towns for one-half the expense 
of equipment. 

Several wardens, realizing the advantage of motorized equip- 
ment for use at forest fires, have been able to procure sufficient 
appropriation from their towns for such, and a piece of motor 
apparatus has been added to their equipment. 

We have co-operated again this year with the Federal Depart- 
ment under the Weeks Law, and were allotted $7,262.36 to be 
expended in fire protection work within the State. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. C. Hutchins, 
State Fire Warden. 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 47 



Comparative Damages by Forest Fires for the Past Twelve Years. 



Year. 


Number 
of Fires. 


Acreage 
burned. 


Cost 
to extin- 
guish. 


Damage. 


Average 
Acreage 
per Fire. 


Average 
Damage 
per Fire. 


1910 

1911 . 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 . . 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 


1,385 
2,356 
1,851 
2,688 
3,181 
3,008 
1,425 
2,175 
2,553 
1,566 
1,619 
2,849 


42,221 
99,693 
22,672 
53,826 
38.975 
48,389 
16.198 
20,020 
37,638 
22.045 
14,517 
29,221 


$23,475 
47,093 
20,219 
35,456 
48,750 
36,783 
8,593 
18,033 
28,043 
17,388 
27,839 
34,065 


$205,383 

537,749 
80,834 

178,357 
95,389 

141,073 
44,765 
41,109 

205,627 
49,069 
62,241 

121,790 


30.46 
39.31 
11.92 
20.02 
12.25 
16.08 
13.22 

9.21 
14.74 
14.07 

8.96 
10.25 


$148 20 

226 24 
43 67 
66 35 
29 98 
46 90 
36 54 
18 90 
80 05 
31 32 
38 44 
42 75 


Types of Classified Damages. 




1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


1920. 


1921. 


Standing trees 

Logs, lumber, cord wood 

Bridges, fences 

Totals 


$24,705 
4,680 
6,893 
687 
4,144 


$71,706 
37,815 
46,025 
1,742 
48,339 


$16,595 
7,516 
12,508 
902 
11,548 


$37,532 
7,371 
11,950 
285 
5,103 


$50,554 
31,006 
10,035 
1,050 
29,145 


$41,109 


$205,627 


$49,069 


$62,241 


$121,790 



Types of Land burned Over (Acres). 





1917. 


1918. 


1919. 


1920. 


1921. 


Timber 


1,237 


2,520 


1,659 


1,077 


2,232 


Second growth 


2,274 


5,696 


2,502 


1,351 


2,654 


Second growth, not merchantable 


4,137 


6,069 


2,893 


2,224 


4,912 




7,126 


10,549 


11,122 


7,119 


11,859 




3,814 


4,669 


3,671 


2,119 


4,467 


Not classified 


1,432 


8,135 


198 


627 


3,097 


Totals - 


20,029 


27,638 


22,045 


14,517 


29,221 



48 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Forest Fires of 1921. 



Months. 


Number. 


Acres. 


Cost to 
extinguish. 


Damage. 


1920. 










December 


20 


61 


§93 00 


$20 00 


1921. 










January 


152 


1,027 


1,111 00 


896 00 


February 


10 


22 


71 00 


1,500 00 




961 


9,160 


6,837 00 


23,599 00 




822 


6,997 


8,540 00 


20,955 00 




337 


6,766 


7,301 00 


60,651 00 




281 


2,339 


6,260 00 


8,329 00 


July 


15 


19 


97 00 


12 00 


August 


35 


104 


262 00 


325 00 


September 


63 


383 


1,008 00 


370 00 


October 


140 


2,313 


2,398 00 


5,083 00 




13 


30 


87 00 


50 00 


Totals 


2,849 


29,221 


§34,065 00 


$121,790 00 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 49 




m o a 



1 1 
i .1 



c -3 
o 

£3 



50 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Towns receiving Fire-equipment Reimbursement during 1921. 



Ashburnham 


. $6 25 


Gosnold 


. $69 80 


Avon . 


. 119 00 


Hancock 


. 60 55 


Boxford 


. 37 50 


Middleton . 


6 25 


Brookfield . 


. 62 25 


New Braintree . 


. 85 75 


Burlington . 


: 21 70 


Pelham 


. . 37 50 


Cummington 


. . 2 37 


Richmond . 


. 54 25 


Dennis 


5 13 


Sterling 


7 55 


Eastham 


. 29 75 


Wellfleet . 


. 92 00 


Enfield 


. . 6 25 






Freetown . 


5 85 


Total . 


. $715 70 


Georgetown 


6 00 







REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTH WORK. 

Mr. William A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — Pursuant to your request, I have the honor to submit 
for your information a brief report of the operations carried on 
against the gypsy and brown-tail moths for the fiscal year ending 
Nov. 30, 1921. The methods used in handling the moth prob- 
lem this year have been practically the same as in past years, 
namely, creosoting followed by spraying. We find this the 
cheapest and most efficient way of carrying on the work. The 
co-operation of the town authorities and the people in general — 
with the exception of a few towns where the citizens did not at- 
tend town meetings and appropriate funds enough to do the 
necessary work — has been very gratifying. We hope for better 
co-operation next year, particularly in respect to the willingness 
of towns to appropriate funds. 

General Conditions. 
I am pleased to say that the gypsy-moth infestation is not as 
severe this fall as a year ago, although in a few towns there is a 
heavy egg deposit. Conditions as a whole show an improve- 
ment. 

Summary of Conditions by Divisions. 
Mr. Fitzgerald's division showed conditions about normal in 
regard to the gypsy moth, some woodland stripping, but the resi- 
dential sections all kept in good condition by spraying. The 
brown-tail moth was more prevalent towards the New Hampshire 
line, but thorough cutting of the webs prevented much damage. 
The wilt disease of the gypsy moth though late was effective. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



51 



In Mr. Hatch's division the brown-tail moth was plentiful 
along the New Hampshire line, particularly in Pepperell, but 
thorough exterminative work was done along the border. The 
gypsy-moth infestation was heavy, and in some towns, notably, 
Lincoln, Ashland, Concord, Weston and Bolton, from 75 to 150 
acres were stripped. But in these towns a large decrease in nests 
was observed in the fall. The State highways in this division 
were sprayed by the State truck sprayers and the foliage pre- 
served. 

Mr. Donovan's division showed a general heavy infestation of 
gypsy moths, with the exception of Winthrop, which is fairly 
free from the insects. The towns all hold the insect in check 
well with the exception of Topsfield, which badly needs a large 
sprayer. The State helped as much as possible with the dusting 
machine and a power sprayer, but in order to keep the town 
trees in good condition a large spraying machine is absolutely 
necessary, and the town should provide means for acquiring one. 
The infestation of gypsy moth in the Lynn woods was exception- 
ally severe this fall, probably owing to reinfestation from the 
water board property. To overcome this bad condition a large 
amount of creosoting was done this fall, and all the worst locali- 
ties will be sprayed next summer. 

Mr. Parkhurst's division is generally infested, and has many 
outlying towns where the seriousness of the problem and the 
necessity for appropriating money are not appreciated. The 
towns of Acushnet, Avon, Dighton, Franklin, Medway, Somerset 
and Walpole need large sprayers badly. Fortunately, Somerset 
has little woodland, and Franklin has a small sprayer, but the 
large sprayers are a necessity now in every town. Berkley is 
mostly woodland and is badly infested. Freetown is in much 
better condition than ever before, and another good year of work 
like the last should put it in first-class condition. In Mansfield 
a great improvement has been made under the new town man- 
ager. In Norton and Plainville conditions are improved, but 
Randolph has not come up to the standard of good work. The 
local superintendent is too busy on other things and the towns- 
people do not co-operate. The city of Taunton should appro- 
priate more money. Conditions are getting bad in Westport and 
more money should be appropriated there. 

In Mr. Ramsey's division the brown-tail moth was found in 
large numbers in Northborough, Southborough and Westborough, 
and was present in other towns. The wilt disease of the gypsy 



52 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



moth was observed late but was very effective. In Oxford, Mil- 
ford and Upton the gypsy moth is on the increase, and more 
careful work should be done by the local officials, and we should 
like to see more interest in the matter on the part of both of- 
ficials and citizens. Poor work is done in Westborough, and in 
Templeton the number of the moths has increased, owing, per- 
haps, to the fact that the local superintendent now lives out of 
town. Mr. Ramsey reports the recurrence of the elm leaf beetle 
in the Connecticut River district, and also in some Worcester 
Count\ f towns. 

Better work against the gypsy moth should be done at the 
State institutions and reservations, particularly Westborough 
State Hospital and the Wachusett Mountain Reservation. All 
towns east of the Connecticut River are now infested, and the 
following towns west of the river were infested on December 1 : — 



Agawam. 

Bernardston. 

Chester. 

Colrain. 

Deerfield. 

Easthampton. 

Gill. 

Granville. 
Greenfield. 



Heath. 

Holyoke. 

Huntington. 

Leyden. 

Rowe. 

Shelburne. 

Southampton. 

Westhampton. 

West Springfield. 



The Federal government, which has maintained a quarantine 
belt in Worcester County for years, has now carried westward 
this belt, giving up to State control 24 towns. These towns will 
have to raise money to meet the obligations of the law, but it 
will probably not be forthcoming until February or March town 
meetings. This will leave a very short time in the season, when 
traveling is hard in the country, to do all the necessary work in 
these towns. Should the government carry this quarantine belt 
as far west as the Connecticut River the sixth district would 
probably be too large for one man to handle. 

Mr. Holmes reports conditions somewhat as usual in his di- 
vision, as improvements in one section are perhaps counteracted 
by conditions in others. Towns needing more and better equip- 
ment for spraying are Bourne (a large town needing two more 
spraying machines), Hanson and Lakeville. The towns of Ed- 
gartown and Chilmark should appropriate more money and do 
thorough scouting and suppressive work. The town of Duxbury 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



53 



cut appropriations down last year to a minimum and did no pri- 
vate spraying, and but for good work done in the past the town 
would have been in bad condition this fall. The officials ap- 
preciate the situation, but the townspeople are indifferent. Both 
Mattapoisett and Rochester should appropriate more funds for 
this work. 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts. 
The Federal work has continued during the past year as usual, 
the only changes being those incident to delayed and reduced 
appropriations. The report of Mr. A. F. Burgess, the agent in 
charge of moth work, is herewith given in full : — 

Owing to drastic reduction in the Federal appropriation for this work, 
and because a very heavily infested area was found in New Jersey during 
the summer of 1920, it was necessary to revise the plans for fall work 
and to request a deficiency appropriation so that this work could be 
continued vigorously both in New Jersey and along the entire infested 
border in New England. On account of lack of funds the work on the 
infested border had to be discontinued Dec. 1, 1920, and owing to pro- 
tracted delay in the deficiency funds becoming available it was not pos- 
sible to resume this work until about March 15 the following spring. 

Scouting was done from that time until the eggs began to hatch, but 
as the season was very early, only about a month was available for scout- 
ing work. Several additional infested towns were found, but many that 
should have been scouted could not be given attention because sufficient 
experienced men could not be secured to carry on the work in the limited 
time that remained. During the spring most of the towns in the area 
heretofore treated by the Bureau were given attention. A considerable 
amount of spraying was carried on in badly infested localities, both in 
this area and in a number of towns towards the east. 

The fall scouting work was organized by dividing the Massachusetts 
border territory into two sections with a general foreman in charge of 
each, with headquarters at Greenfield and Springfield, respectively. 
Scouting was begun early in the fall, but the maximum number of crews 
that it was planned to use were not available until late in November, 
when it was possible to transfer some from areas farther north. 

The result of the scouting thus far indicates scattered infestations in 
many towns west of the known infested area, and at the present writing 
scouting work is not nearly completed. Several towns in the Berkshires 
have been found slightly infested, particularly in the northern part of 
the State. The infestation is fight in all cases, but sufficient work has 
been done to indicate that the discontinuance of field work last year has 
made possible much additional spread of the insect. Since 1913 the 



54 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Bureau has been carrying on scouting and control work in Massachusetts 
west of a line running across the State in a somewhat north and south 
direction, immediately west of Worcester. This belt of towns has in- 
creased gradually from year to year. 

With the funds available, it is impossible to carefully scout and treat 
an area much greater than 25 miles in width along the border. If this 
work is thoroughly and systematically done, it is believed that reasonable 
protection from the spread of the insect will be afforded other States to 
the westward. Under these conditions it is necessary for the State to 
make arrangements to take care of the treatment of towns which can no 
longer be handled by the Bureau. 

The infestation during the past year, particularly in towns between 
Boston and Worcester, was unusually severe and heavy defoliation re- 
sulted in many areas. Introduced parasites were found in many sections 
of the territory, and some of these species were more abundant than usual. 
The fact remains, however, that in most of these areas the introduced 
parasites were not abundant enough to bring about effective control. 

A considerable amount of foreign work has been done by the Bureau 
looking to the establishment of all parasites or natural enemies of the 
gypsy moth that may be useful in this country. This work was inter- 
rupted during the war, but arrangements have now been made to send 
experts to Europe and Japan to make further studies of the natural con- 
trol of this insect in these countries, and to ship to the Melrose High- 
lands Laboratory as much parasitized material as possible. This work 
will be taken up at once, and it is hoped that substantial progress will 
be made along this line within the next few years. 

Special North Shore Work. 
Woodland work was carried on this year under the co-opera- 
tive fund in the same way as usual, the creosoting and spraying 
being done only where it was necessary, thus using only a small 
part of the fund. No signs of feeding were noticed where work 
was done. A total acreage of 2,754 was creosoted and 1,230 
acres were sprayed. Six and one-half miles of State highway 
trees in the city of Gloucester and 5| miles in the city of Beverly 
were creosoted and sprayed. A financial statement showing the 
present status of the fund is here given. In addition to the bal- 
ance now on hand the sum of $900.69 has been collected for 
work done on private estates and will be added to the fund by 
Col. William D. Sohier, the agent of the residents co-operating, 
within a few days. 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 55 



Financial Statement. 



Receipts. 

Balance from 1920 $18,209 26 

Massachusetts Highway Division 176 41 

State Forester, for work done . . . . . . . 483 93 



$18,869 60 

Expenditures. 

Services $5,341 81 

Travel I 84 68 

Supplies K 4,364 63 

Sundries 449 67 

Rent 420 00 

Telephone 76 80 

10,737 59 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1921 $8,132 01 



Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Smith, 
Superintendent of Moth Work. 



APPENDIX 



APPENDIX. 



Financial Statement. 
Expenditures. 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), 

salary of Commissioner .... $5,000 00 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), per- 
sonal services ...... 10,500 00 

§15,500 00 

Expenditures 15,470 00 $15,470 00 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), office 

incidentals $5,500 00 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), ex- 
penses of Commissioner .... 250 00 

5,750 00 

Expenditures 4,852 20 4,852 20 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), gen- 
eral forestry and nurseries . . . $13,000 00 

Amount brought forward from 1920 . . 2 93 

13,002 93 

Expenditures 12,997 48 12,997 48 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), purchase and 

planting of forest lands 10,000 00 

Expenditures 8,058 29 8,058 29 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), pre- 
vention of forest fires .... $40,000 00 

Federal appropriation 2,500 00 

Appropriation (c. 502, Acts of 1921), pre- 
vention of forest fires .... 6,000 00 

Federal allotment 4,762 36 

53,262 36 

Expenditures 53,262 29 53,262 29 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), pro- 
tection against forest fires 1,000 00 

Expenditures 715 70 715 70 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), for reimburse- 
ment for fighting forest fires 1,000 00 

Expenditures - - 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), sup- 
pression of gypsy and brown-tail moths $210,000 00 

Balance from 1920 47,056 36 

Refunds and transfers 1,037 84 

258,094 20 

Expenditures 181,957 92 181,957 92 

Appropriation (c. 203, Acts of 1921), maintenance of 

forests 25,000 00 

Expenditures 24,974 99 24,974 99 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



Table Reimbursements op Towxs ot 

Cities for the 1 ear 1921 - Continued. 



1921. 



Cities ant> 
Towxs. 



1922. 



Boxborough 
Boxford . 
Borlston 
Brain tree 
Bre -stater 
Bridge water 
Brim field 
Brockton 
Brookfield 
Brookline 
Burl:^ g~on 
Cambridge . 
Canton . 
Carlisle . 
Carver . 
Charlton 
Chatham 



Chester . 

Chkopee 

Chilmark 

Clarksburg 

Clinton . 

Cohasset 

Colrain . 

Concord 

Dana . 

Dan vers 

Dartmouth 

Dedham 

Deer field 



Private 
Work. 



Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 



Tools 



! Total 
, Amount 
received 
from 
State. 



urn ^ 

397 64 
259 72 
4,445 23 
447 65 
1,90156 
390 99 
5.000 00 
707 44 
5.000 00 
569 64 
5.000 00 
2.750 11 
233 55 
M N 
655 97 
1.118 99 
UU§ U 
5.000 00 



5.000 00 
183 25 
203 05 
4.712 00 
2,674 25 
466 .-4 
2.936 04 
214 84 
3,480 12 
fJMj J§ 
54)00 00 
1,715 52 



J17S22 
1.194 59 
1.176 95 



2.112 91 



Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 



36 00 
1 A M " 

552 37 

637 04 



S37 56 
7 -5 95 
917 23 



..as 1 »«* 



564 33 



276 05 



$637 33 
753 80 
432 86 

320 79 
1.223 68 



Mm ■ 

1.550 75 
1.350 09 



566 02 
1.435 03 



1.719 04 



6-s *4 



747 82 
2.403 00 

1196 
10* 72 



6S3 13 



2.466 86 
2.895 19 



S136 65 
409 45 
267 54 
4,819 95 
447 52 
1.931 95 
3S6 97 
5.000 00 
437 15 
5.000 00 
583 77 
5,000 00 
2,754 53 
239 04 
896 71 
651 34 
1,270 12 
2.624 22 
5.000 00 
412 90 
5.000 00 
187 35 
228 97 
5.000 00 
2,717 14 
550 55 
2,999 69 
256 44 
3,542 64 
3,247 84 
5.000 00 
1.808 27 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



63 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1921 — Continued. 





1921. 


1922. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
Quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 



Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Dennis . 


$606 97 


$868 56 


f $112 50! 
[ 165 00 


j $26159 


$531 38 


$792 97 


»wi yd 


Dighton 


1,189 45 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1,260 45 


Douglas . 


662 69 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


623 47 


Dover 


1,120 29 


1,530.87 


2,492 79 


410 58 


1,054 85 


1,465 43 


1 1 7ft 9.1 
l,ll\J 01 


Dracut . 


1,326 47 


2,306 76 


985 10 


980 29 


1,259 05 


2,239 34 


1,334 72 


Dudley . 


1,259 20 


- 


- 




- 


- 


1 OOO QA 

1. •-- 89 


Dunstable 


17419 


675 71 


357 10 


501 52 


213 69 


715 21 


172 46 


Duxbury 


1,693 03 


1,770 53 


633 26 


77 50 


1,299 95 


1,377 45 


1 Til 11 

1./41 14 


East Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


328 54 


East Bridgewater . 


1,445 79 


1,644 84 


1,097 98 


199 05 


999 71 


1,198 76 


l.OOU Oo 


East Longmeadow 


794 81 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


eon nn 


East ham 


236 52 


667 47 


100 00 


430 95 


128 52 


559 47 


245 50 


Easthampton 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


r aaa aa 


Easton . . . 


1,799 03 


2,847 71 


/ 84001 
I 980 84 


} 1,048 68 
- 


1,824 74 


2,873 42 


1,875 29 


Edgartown 


718 81 


- 


- 


- 


- 


792 61 


unneici . . . 


270 10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


on; no 
ouo uy 


Erving . 


734 73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


749 16 


Essex ... 


548 41 


517 79 


815 50 


- 


307 51 


276 89 


ooy ol 


Everett . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0,1)00 00 


Fair haven 


3,145 65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


O A 1 A AA 

o,4i-t yy 


Fall River 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


c aaa aa 
5,000 00 


Falmouth . . 


3,086 10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


A ZOO -J 

4,080 1 1 


ritcnuurg 


5,000 00 












Z. AAA AA 

5,000 00 


Foxborough . 


1,265 2 9 


1,465 97 


451 61 


17 30 


857 98 


1,058 66 


1 OGO A9 
1,-iSO Oo 


Framingham . 


5,000 00 












; 5,000 00 


Franklin 


2,586 19 












2,595 94 


Freetown 


554 96 


733 16 


194 74 


178 20 


376 42 


554 62 


582 35 


Gardner 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Georgetown . 


599 16 


1,435 55 


/ 62 141 
I 977 50 


} 836 39 


1,149 87 


1,986 26 


612 41 


Gill 


285 04 












297 29 


Gloucester 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Grafton . 


1,519 98 












1,963 95 



i Lead sold. 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [ Jan . 

Table showing Expenditures AMD Reimbuesemexts of Towns AM) 



Cities and 
Towns. 


1921. 




1922. 


Re- Total 
quired 1 Net 
Expend- Expend 
iture. , iture. 


Private 
• Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
suppliec 


Total 
Amoum 
j received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 

iture. 


Granby . 


1355 53 




- 


















- 


- 


- 


$352 42 


Granville 


- 


- 


_ 




















- 


— 


251 27 


Great xsarrington . 


3,269 40 


- 


_ 




















- 


3,410 72 


Greenfield 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


















- 


- 


_ 


5,000 00 


Greenwich 


156 96 


- 


- 
















- 


- 


_ 


99n (LA 
46V 04 


Groton . 


1,278 48 


$1,669 94 


f $359 84 
j 69 45 
[ 374 70 


! ) $391 46 


$862 66 


$1,254 12 


1,318 83 


Groveland 


645 72 


1,230 22 


1 105 00 
I 888 85 


i KOA tin 
j 084 00 


424 13 


1,008 63 


658 21 


Hadley . 


1,193 00 


























1,172 93 


Halifax . 


376 46 


QUV OS 


/ 6109' 
I 790 31 


\ AO A 11 
j 424 1Z 


476 23 


900 35 


376 71 


Hamilton 


1,701 12 




_ 




12 95 


















1,764 04 


Hampden 


I . 


























197 92 


Hanover 


934 29 


2,197 70 


/ 93 001 
i 954 88 


? 1,263 41 


1,522 14 


2,785 55 


OfiO 9n 

yoo oy 


Hanson . 


834 11 


1,131 86 


/ 57 761 
I 878 10 


907 7K 

Zyi 10 


694 82 


992 57 


QA o on 

s4o zy 


Hardwick 


1 997 An 

l,6il 40 












1,342 62 


Harvard 


821 33 


1,065 71 


/ 97 50* 
1 271 87 


OAA 90 

/ J44 OS 


1,436 42 


1,680 80 


BOA 9K 
0Z4 OO 


Harwich 


874 76 


1,731 52 


/ 117 611 
I 1,368 91 


esc ic 
> OOO to 


1,197 12 


2,053 88 


y4y 00 


Haverhill 


5,000 00 










— 


c nnt\ nn 
0,VVV IHJ 


Heath . 






























1 OR 09 

no y<j 


Hingham 


3,568 59 






■ 


- 


- 


3,683 33 


Holbrook 


854 03 


Q7Q AS 


419 00 


19? At 


121 91 


247 32 


Q4fi OA 


Holden . 


1,020 30 


1,155 73 


/ 91081 
I 333 20 


L 19? AO 
/ 160 -t-j 


495 20 


630 63 


1,032 84 


TT 

Holland . 


67 39 












0/ to 


Holliston 


1,031 15 


919 45 


f 153 001 
[ 703 98 


f 


494 02 


382 32 


1 flfil IS 


Holyoke 


5,000 00 












s firm fin 
0,VVV VV 


Hopedale 


1,359 06 












1 9CO ?n 

1,300 oy 


Hop kin ton 


839 89 


946 44 < 


96 401 

238 75 J 


> 106 55 


389 07 


495 62 


844 78 


Hubbardston 


354 30 












419 73 


Hudson . 


2,330 98 


























2,417 41 


Hull 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Huntington . 














415 15 


Ipswich . . 


2,422 77 








72 51 




2,521 93 


Kingston 


748 79 


745 89 { 


120 651 \ 
907 01 / 




236 76 


233 86 


789 74 



Lead sold. 



Supplies sold. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



65 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1921 — Continued. 





1921. 


1922. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
lmburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 


Lakeville 


$514 37 


$675 72 


/ $76 10 1 

\ 270 91 


} $16135 


$547 62 


$708 97 : 


$529 98 


Lancaster 


1,033 70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,077 32 


Lawrence 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Leicester 


1,131 73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,153 67 


Lenox 


2,951 37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,860 62 


Leominster . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Leverett 


180 11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


179 56 


Lexington 


3,984 16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,105 52 


Leyden . 


114 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


113 44 


Lincoln . 


802 43 


958 38 


1,483 62 


- 


2,001*44 


2,001 44 


877 06 


Littleton 


653 39 


293 35 


/ 702 741 
\ 101 50 


} - 


1,010 75 


650 71 


674 68 


Longmeadow . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,272 77 


Lowell . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Ludlow . 


3,371 05 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,526 77 


Lunenburg 


746 25 


802 31 


1,174 85 


56 05 


I,038;i3 


1,094 18 


739 40 


Lynn 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Lynn field 


791 71 


1,630 61 


639 65 


864 40 


1,100 86 


1,965 26 


824 03 


Maiden . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Manchester 


4,622 88 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,723 39 


Mansfield 


2,538 48 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,533 52 


Marblehead ! 


4,753 19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Marion . 


1,334 63 


1,314 73 


682 40 


- 


1,453 13 


1,433 13 


1,365 86 


Marlborough . 


5,000 00 


- 






- 




5,000 00 


Marshfield 


1,210 29 


1,210 49 


/ 60 12i 
1 2,383 66 




1,787 15 


1,787 15 


1,350 71 


Mashpee 


200 58 


1,750 13 


460 14 


1,549 55 


420 86 


1,970 41 


213 44 


Mattapoisett . 


857 31 












847 62 


Maynard 


2,081 30 












2,114 80 


Medfield 


883 76 


1,772 87 


/ 35 701 
1 948 00 


} 889 11 


827 49 


1,716 60 


890 47 


Medford 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Medway 


963 06 












996 76 


Melrose . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Mendon . 


325 14 












361 20 



Lead sold. 



66 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1921 — Continued. 





1921. 


1922. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Merrimac 


$693 48 


$1,278 02 


/ $27 50 1 

1 374. 73 


) $584 54 


$409 73 


$994 2 7 


$713 44 


Methuen 


5,000 00 


_ 






_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Middleborough 


2,366 69 


2,941 43 


1,523 11 


574 74 


963 47 


1,538 21 


2,791 62 


Middleton 


448 63 


892 22 


/ 100 00 1 
1 Ml 


} 443 59 


424 86 


868 45 


461 41 


Milford . 


4,823 13 


_ 






_ ' 


_ 


4,880 93 


Millbury 


1,750 05 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,795 86 


Millis . 


820 64 


_ 


_ 


_ 


17 00 


_ 


834 11 


Millville . 


53125 


_ 


_ 


— » 


_ 


_ 


539 29 


Milton . 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Monson . 


836 12 




_ 


_ 






834 50 


Montague 


3,671 42 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,767 16 


Nahant . 


1,670 01 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,724 62 


Nantucket 


2,266 05 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,366 95 


Natick . 


3,904 07 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,968 45 


Need ham 


4,386 06 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4,565 42 


New Bedford 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


New Braintree 


203 83 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


211 66 


New Salem . 


208 94 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


212 84 


Newbury 


649 81 


1,613 20 


/ 484 661 
1 1 311 41 


) 963 39 

> 


1,253 87 


2,217 26 


719 13 


Newburyport 


4,775 56 


_ 






_ 


_ 


4,887 77 


Nevrton . 


5,000 00 




_ 


_ 


_ 




5,000 00 


Norfolk . 


532 17 


983 05 


/ 25 92 1 

1 903 KA 


) 450 88 

> 


551 17 


1,002 05 


542 03 


North Andover 


2,964 99 


_ 






_ 


_ 


3,145 36 


North Attleborough 


3,453 37 


-' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,541 25 


North Brookfield . 


878 56 












887 54 


North Reading 


607 14 


1,221 84 


705 62 


614 70 


1,127 73 


1,742 43 


635 73 


Northampton 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Northborough 


818 66 


1,578 57 


/ 227 601 
1 287 28 


} 759 91 


1,091 88 


1,851 79 


833 05 


Nbrthbridge . 


2,403 45 












2,580 23 


Xorthfield 


695 64 












70142 


Norton . 


829 38 


1,294 13 


/ 22 501 
V 235 89 


} 464 75 


350 07 


814 82 


874 49 


Nor well . 


536 57 


1,455 35 


1,422 33 


918 78 


81100 


1,72 9 78 


572 35 



i Lead sold. 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 67 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1921 — Continued. 





1921. 


1922. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 




iture. 


iture. 






iture. 


Norwood 


$5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$5,000 00 


Oak Bluffs . 


1,049 83 


$1,593 34 


- 


- 


$1,361 71 2 


$936 71 


1,148 78 


Oakham 


176 12 


- 


- 




- 


- 


177 40 


Orange . 


1,847 72 


- 


— 




- 


- 


2,097 87 


Orleans . 


656 77 


646 50 


$507 29 


- 


518 76 


508 49 


661 10 


Oxford . 


977 12 


- 


— 




- 


- 


983 59 


Palmer . 


3,873 48 


- 




- 


- 


- 


! 4,186 32 


Paxton . 


195 45 




— 




- 


- 


194 55 


Peabody 


5,000 00 




- 




- 


- 


5,000 00 


Pelham . 


220 12 


- 






- 


- 


220 49 


Pembroke 


579 63 


1,862 16 


/ 71 70 1 
( 1,712 50 


| $1,282 93 


912 42 


2,195 35 


617 66 


Pepperell 


1,089 29 


2,164 95 


1 1 1 7 7ft 1 
1 11/ IV 

\ 453 69 


} 1,075 66 


789 74 


1,865 40 


1,222 05 


Petersham 


554 23 






- 


- 


- 


555 29 


Philllpston . 


139 40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


149 91 


Plainville 


478 75 


792 80 


390 67 


14 05 


1,143 76 2 


857 81 


51108 


Plymouth 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 


5,000 00 


Plympton 


228 27 


1,027 99 


/ 38 00 1 
[ 205 45 


\ 799 72 

1 


400 60 


1,200 32 


235 25 


Prescott . 


110 03 


- 


- 




- 


- 


116 80 


Princeton 


447 53 


2,016 19 


/ 34 00 1 

\ 62 25 


) 1,568 66 


241 77 


1,810 43 


476 47 


Provincetown 


1,525 04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,551 52 


Quincy . 


5,000 00 


- 




- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Randolph 


1,213 68 


- 


- 


- 


264 79 


- 


1,241 24 


Raynham 


546 64 


532 89 


444 00 




68 03 


54 28 


557 40 


Reading 


3,686 12 






; 






3,805 54 


Rehoboth 


699 15 












698 95 


Revere . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Rochester 


469 17 


530 73 


276 69 


61 56 


326 55 


388 11 


444 03 


Rockland 


2,652 94 












2,648 43 


Rockport 


1,818 11 












1,868 23 


Rowe 














114 18 


Rowley . 


439 21 


1,178 81 


/ 487 00 1 . 
t 682 66 


} 739 60 


1,066 15 


1,805 75 


451 83 


Royalston 


401 07 












412 83 





1 Lead sold. 2 Includes sprayer, for which town paid one-half. 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1921 — Continued. 





1921. 


1922. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Rutland 


w\n os 












$440 67 


Salem 


5 ooo on 

\J ,VJVJ\J \J\J 












5,000 00 


Salisbury 




$798 31 


f $89 92 « 
I 1,066 48 


\ 






995 13 


Sandwich 


636 93 


1,436 45 


/ 216 61 1 
1 870 70 


I 1799 52 


777 09 


1,576 61 


662 36 


Saugus . 


3,385 72 












3,548 00 


Scituate . 


2,923 87 












3,039 26 


Seekonk 


1,019 04 












1,042 02 


Sharon . 


1,531 69 


1,478 33 


543 74 




783 25 


729 97 


1,588 16 


Shelburne 


936 36 












937 24 


Sherborn 


704 35 


2,242 31 


\ 20 80 1 
\ 1,281 75 


j 1,537 96 


1,319 10 


9 857 Ofi 


716 92 


Shirley . 


785 83 


791 75 


490 95 




466 58 


466 58 


792 76 


Shrewsbury . 


1,839 37 


1,673 83 


/ 490 21 1 
\ 554 35 


\ - 
I 


478 49 


312 95 


1,953 40 


Shutesbury . 


157 87 












149 21 


Somerset 


1,154 47 












1,201 16 


Somerville 


5 OOf) 00 












5,000 00 


South Hadley 


2,206 78 












2,167 97 


Southborough 


953 14 


1,701 06 


/ 31141 
\ 918 88 


| 747 92 


784 08 


1 532 00 


1,117 95 


Southbridge . 


4,468 90 












4,538 16 


Southwick 














464 04 


Spencer . 


1,524 52 












1,568 06 


Springfield 


5 000 00 












5,000 00 


Sterling . 


596 82 


848 27 


/ 129 82 i 
\ 145 35 


| 251 45 


489 46 


740 91 


602 35 


Stockbridge . 


2 298 32 












2,316 45 


Stoneham 


2,960 59 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,100 15 


Stoughton 


2,346 88 












2,377 63 


Stow 


632 89 


816 51 


/ 567 51 i 
\ 456 70 


J 142 33 


1,197 07 


1,339 40 


637 08 


Sturbridge 


438 90 












489 45 


Sudbury 


603 44 


988 75 


/ 355 36 1 
i 704 07 


| 385 31 


1,103 83 


1,489 14 


652 16 


Sunderland . 


368 44 












365 43 


Sutton . 


677 30 












715 09 


Swampscott . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Swansea 


846 63 












851 21 



1 Lead sold. 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



69 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1921 — Continued. 





1921. 


1922. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


1 till 11 LOU . • 


$5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


t ^ ooo oo 

vO,UUU uu 


Templeton 


1,038 80 


$641 27 


$373 88 


- 


$9 76 


- 


1,087 34 


Tewksbury 


1.15G 15 


2,448 14 


810 91 


$1,291 99 


1,378 40 


$2,670 39 


1,172 96 


Tisbury 


97127 


1,486 89 


74 00 


90 62 


1,952 20 2 


1,617 82 


1 013 Q3 




944 94 


1,344 03 


553 60 


399 09 


336 59 


735 68 


1 000 3.1 


Townsend 


828 04 


1,324 39 


538 32 


496 35 


723 73 


1,220 08 


838 64 


Truro 


260 26 


448 01 


99 00 


187 75 


253 98 


441 73 


256 23 




377 27 


2,176 67 


1,360 43 


1,799 40 


1,390 76 


3,190 16 


394 96 




593 18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


582 29 


Ux bridge 


2,197 94 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




W&kefield 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


t 000 00 
o,uuu uu 


Wales 


145 14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


144 18 


YVflI r\r\ ] a 


3,243 93 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,416 67 




5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


s fvoo on 
O ,uuu uu 


Ware 


2,638 46 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


o fine 0,7 


Ware ham 


3,298 73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 357 *>fi 


Warren 


1,530 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1 fill 71 
1 ,014 / 1 


War u.* i p Lr 


188 82 


- 


- 


- 


- 






Watertown 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


k onn on 
o,uuu uu 


Way land 


1,207 28 


960 69 


1,088 22 


- 


1,106 62 


860 03 


1 ,ir±U Uo 


Viator 


4,147 65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Q 7Q0 1 •> 


Wellesley 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


^ ooo on 

o,uuu uu 


Wellfleet 


351 88 


690 58 


/ 10 64i 
\ 24100 


} 338 70 


407 70 


746 40 


372 77 


Wendell 


ORR AO 

-oo oy 












295 38 


Wen ham 


1,083 36 


1,053 36 


367 16 




449 49 


419 49 


1,096 64 


West Boylston 


512 68 


932 10 


f 74 30 1 
\ 573 20 


j 419 42 


518 57 


937 99 


524 12 


West Bridgewater . 


833 36 


2,013 10 


/ 89 40 1 
\ 550 39 


1 1,179 74 


870 97 


2,050 71 


877 56 


West Brook6eld . 


461 13 












454 94 


West Newbury 


434 48 


844 50 


/ 39 001 
I 922 97 


} 350 02 


746 63 


1,096 65 


437 40 


West Spring6eld . 


5,000 00 












5.0C0 00 


West Tisbury 


240 07 












250 21 


Westborough . 


1,485 20 


2,406 47 


/ 48 32 1 
1 681 76 


] 921 27 


766 65 


1,687 92 


1,516 63 



1 Lead sold. 



2 Includes sprayer, for which town paid one-half. 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1921 — Concluded. 





1921. 


1922. 


Cities and 

TOWX3. 


Re- 
quired 
Eipend- 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
nient . 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 

A m mint 

received 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Westford 


tum m 




$451 50* 

\ 552 02 


} - 


11.40s 75 




SI ,234 46 


Westhampton 






/ 




13153 


Westminster . 


m 


774 35 




$31152 


395 12 


706 64 


4?i 42 


Weston . 


2,164 52 


4,4(35 01 


417 50 




2,092 52 


2,092 52 


2,328 94 


West port 


1.S55 17 












1.S46S8 


West wood 


1.105 05 












1,131 68 


Weymouth 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 






5.000 00 


Whitman 


2.505 83 




■ 








2,545 15 


Wilbraham . 


S4S 25 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


859 13 


Wilmington . 


977 08 


2,900 75 


766 50 


1,923 73 


1,374 09 


mh ■ 


1,007 97 


Winchendon . 


1.954 55 












2.020 58 


Winchester . 


5.000 00 












5,000 00 


Winthrop 


5.000 00 












5.000 00 


^\oburn . 


5.000 00 












5,000 00 




5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Wren t ham 


763 52 












819 98 


Yarmouth 


810 58 


1.112 18 


627 95 


30160 


719 66 


1,021 26 


87180 



1 Lead sold. 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 71 

The Distribution of Supplies. 

Supplies, including arsenate of lead and hose, have been fur- 
nished to towns and cities doing gypsy-moth work as usual. The 
amounts given in the list below do not always correspond exactly 
with the aid given the towns, as some towns make payments to 
the State for all or a part of the bill for supplies, according to 
the amount of their net expenditure or their class, under the 
provisions of section 4, chapter 132 of the General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement and 
for expenditures, see table on page 61. 



List of Cities and Towns and Amounts of Supplies furnished for 

1921. 



Abington . . . 


$1 50 


XXtlXl^UIl ... 


SKQ4 S9 




1 101 16 


XLcLL \ (XI H • • 


1 4^fi 4.9 


As n burn nam . . 


177 RH 

. X 4 4 OU 


Harwich 


1 1 Q7 1 9 


Ashby 


AOS 7K 
DUO 4 O 


Holbrook . 


191 Q1 

iji yi 


Asb.l3.nd . . 


1 Q1 1 « 

Lit X lo 


XXUltXcIl . . . 


aq s on 


Avon. . . . 


1 $48 *}fi 
loo oU 


Holliston 




Ayer 


49 C\£ 
14 U4 


Hopkinton 


**ftQ 0,7 




1 OKQ 4fi 


1 pa vv 1L 11 • • 


79 ^i 
4 £1 1 


Berkley . 


1 ftQ sn 


Kingston . . . 


9QA 7 A 








A9 

. • J -t 4 U _ 


jdoivou 


1 9/17 en 

L,Z"±4 oU 


Lincoln 


9 nni A A 


Boxborough . . 


001 00 


j-iiLiieion 


1 0.1 O, 7 s ; 


Boxford . . . 


7^1 an 

4 Do OU 


Lunenburg 


1 AQQ 1 r> 
l,Uoo lo 


Boylston 


432 86 


Lynnfield 


1,100 86 


Brewster . 


320 79 


Marion . 


1,453 13 


Bridgewater 


1,223 68 


Marshfield 


1,787 15 


Burlington 


698 44 


Mashpee . 


420 86 


Carlisle 


747 82 


Medfield . 


827 49 


Carver 


. 2,403 00 


Merrimac . 


409 73 


Chatham . 


11 96 


Middlebo rough . 


963 47 


Chelmsford 


109 72 


Middleton 


424 86 


Dennis 


531 38 


Millis 


17 00 


Dover 


. 1,054 85 


Newbury . 


1,253 87 


Dracut 


. 1,259 05 


Norfolk . 


551 17 


Dunstable 


213 69 


North Reading . 


1,127 73 


Duxbury . 


. 1,299 95 


Northborough . 


. 1,091 88 


East Bridgewater 


999 71 


Norton 


350 07 


Eastham . 


128 52 


Nor well 


811 00 


Easton 


. 1,824 74 


Oak Bluffs 


1,361 71 


Essex 


307 51 


Orleans 


518 76 


Foxborough 


857 98 


Pembroke 


912 42 


Freetown . 


376 42 


Pepperell . 


789 74 


Georgetown 


. 1,149 87 


Plainville . 


. 1,143 76 


Groton 


862 66 


Plympton 


400 60 


Groveland 


424 13 


Princeton . 


241 77 


Halifax 


476 23 


Randolph . 


264 79 


Hamilton . 


12 95 


Raynham . 


68 03 


Hanover . 


. 1,522 14 


Rochester 


326 55 



72 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



LrsT of Cities and Towns and Amounts of Supplies furnished for 

1921 — Concluded. 



Rowley .... $1,066 


15 


Truro 


. $253 


98 


Salisbury .... 


732 


01 


Tyngsborough . 


. 1,390 


76 


Sandwich .... 


777 


09 


Way land • . 


. 1,106 


62 


Sharon .... 


783 


25 


Wellfleet . 


407 


70 


Sherborn .... 


1,319 


10 


Wenham . 


449 


49 


Shirley . 


466 


58 


West Boylston . 


518 


57 


Shrewsbury 


478 


49 


West Bridgewater 


870 


97 


Southborough . 


784 


08 


West Newbury . 


746 


63 


Sterling 


489 




\\ estborougn 


766 


65 


Stow . . . . 


1,197 


07 


Westford . 


. 1,408 


75 


Sudbury .... 


1,103 


83 


Westminster 


395 


12 


Templeton 


9 


76 


Weston 


. 2,092 


52 


Tewksbury 


1,378 


40 


Wilmington 


. 1,374 


09 


Tisbury .... 


1,952 


20 


Yarmouth 


719 


m 


Topsfield .... 


336 


59 








Townsend 


723 


73 




$80,215 


26 


Automobile supplies 








. $1,053 


92 


General forestry and nurseries 








215 


38 


Prevention of forest fires 








135 


.37 


Maintenance of forests 








285 


S7 


Maintenance of nurseries 








27 


35 


Special North Shore fund 








. 3,511 


93 


Purchase and development of State forests .... 


244 


SO 


Purchase and planting of forest lands 






1 


90 


Maintenance of Standish Monument 






5 


25 


Experimental work 








12 


60 


Massachusetts Highway Division 






845 


25 


Traveling sprayers and trucks 








941 


62 










$7,281 24 



Statement of Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests for 
the Year ending Nov. 30, 1921. 





Expenses. 










General 
















State Forest. 


Planting 
and 


Upkeep, 
Fire Lines, 


Surveying, 


Land 




Total 




Receipts. 




Nursery. 


Roads, 


etc. 


















etc. 
















Arthur Warton Swann . 


$619 00 


$649 54 


$318 25 






$1,586 


79 


$4,873 


44 


Bear Mountain 






1,505 25 


$23,283 


00 


24,788 


25 






Co Ira in .... 


3,600 00 


444 63 


232 50 


1,474 


00 


5,751 


13 






Conway 


1,120 11 


334 69 


164 48 


330 


00 


1,949 


28 






Erving 


319 63 


1,275 15 


994 66 


3,057 


60 


5,647 


04 






Harold Parker 


287 35 




231 00 






518 


35 


25 


00 


Mohawk Trail 






3,405 83 


50,625 


00 


54,030 


83 


20 


12 


Mount Grace 




655 99 


1,054 36 


22,400 


00 


24,110 


35 






Myles Standish 


3,075 80 


8,783 41 


179 60 






12,038 


81 


256 


00 


Otter River . 


2,343 98 


2,050 14 








4,394 


12 


20 


00 


Sandwich 






493 50 


952 


69 


1,446 


19 


275 


00 


Savoy Mountain . 


980 49 


670 45 


2,730 67 


5,533 


50 


9,915 


11 






Tolland 


1,441 06 


1,363 65 


2,080 47 


1,280 


00 


6,165 


18 






Wendell 




577 14 


1,991 66 


9,811 


95 


12,380 


75 






Totals . 


$13,787 42 


$16,804 79 


$15,382 23 


$118,747 


74 


$164,722 


18 


$5,469 


56 



1922.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



73 



List of Forest Wardens axd Local Moth Superintendents. 

[Alphabetically by towns and cities.] 





District 

X UMBER. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Su pcrintcnclcnt ■ 


Div. 
Xo 


3 




John H. McMackins . 


Abington 


C. F. Shaw- 


5 


1 




Wm. H. Kingsley 


Acton . 


Albert H. Perkins . 


2 


2 




Saul Guibeault . 


Acushnet 


Thos. Rogerson 


4 


5 




Edgar A. Deyette 


Adams . 


Edgar A. Deyette 


6 


5 




Edw. M. Hitchcock . 


Agawam 


E. M. Hitchcock 


6 


a 




Wm. F. Milligan . 


Alford . 


- 


- 


1 




James E. Feltham 


Amesbury 


Joseph Merrill . 


3 


4 




A. F. Bardwell . 


Amherst 


\\. H. Smith . 


6 


1 




Lester Hilton 


Andover 


Edw. H. Berry . 


3 


1 




Walter H. Pierce 


Arlington 


Daniel M. Daley 


2 


6 




C. H. Billings . 


Ashburnham 


Chas. H. Pratt . 


2 


6 




W. S. Green 


Ashby . 


Carl H. Houghton 


2 


6 




Ralph Tredick . 


Ashfield 


- 


- 


1 




Fred E. Johnson 


Ashland 


Theodore P. Hall 


2 


6 




Frank P. Hall . 


Athol . 


George A. Whitney . 


6 


2 




Hiram R. Packard 


Attleboro 


W. E. S. Smith . 


4 


4 




J. F. Searles 


Auburn 


J. F. Searles . 


6 


2 




Stephen C. Graham . 


Avon 


W. W. Reals 


4 


1 




Dewey P. Downing 


Aver 


John E. Keegan 


2 


3 




Zebina H. Jenkins 


Barnstable . 


Robert Cross 


5 


4 




Albert E. Traver 


Barre 


Jas. A. Dwinnell 


6 


5 




P. B. McCormack 


Becket . 


- 


- 


1 




Irving C. Waite . 


Bedford 


W. A. Cutler . 


3 


4 




John J. Fairchild 


Belchertown 


E. C Howard . 


6 


2 




L. F. Thayer 


Bellingham 


Lewis E. Whitney 


4 


1 




John F. Leonard 


Belmont 


Martin Troy 


2 


2 




Gideon H. Babbitt 


Berkley 


A. A. Briggs 


4 


4 




Forrest E. Day . 


Berlin . 


Albert R. Jones 


2 


6 




Therman H. Keet 


Bernardston 


Edwin B. Hale . 


6 






Robert H. Grant 


Beverly 


Jas. W. Blackmer 


1 


1 




E X. Bartlett . 


Billerica 


Francis J. Dolan 


3 


4 




John H. Dwyer . 


Blackstone . 


A. J. Duggan 


6 


5 




I. E. Whitney . 


Blandford . 






4 




Harry L. Sutton 


Bolton . 


C. E. Mace 


2 








Boston 


Wm. P. Long 




3 




Walter E. R. Nye 


Bourne 


Edw. D. Nickerson . 


5 



74 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


1 . . . . 


H. J. Livermore . 


Boxborough 


S. D. Salmon, 3d 


2 


1 . . . . 


C. E. Brown 


B oxford 


Charles Perley . 


3 


4 . 


John N. Flagg 


Boylston 


Walter A. Stone 


6 


2 . . . 


Fred Tenney 


Braintree 


Wm. J. McCusker 


4 


3 . 


Thomas B. Tubman . 


Brewster 


Abbott N. Baker 


5 


3 . ... 


F. C. Worthen . 


Bridgewater 


F. C. Worthen . 


5 


4 . 


Geo. E. Hitchcock 


Brimfield 


Frank G. Hitchcock . 


6 


3 . 


Wm. F. Daley . 


Brockton . 


Rufus H. Carr . 


5 


4 . 


Merrill A. Love . 


Brookfield . 


Albert Hobbs . 


6 


2 . 


Geo. H. Johnson 


Brookline 


Ernest B. Dane 


1 


6 . 


Gilbert E. Griswold . 


Buckland 






1 . . . . 


Walter W. Skelton 


Burlington . 


Walter W. Skelton . 


3 


- 




Cambridge . 


J. F. Donnelly . 


2 


2 . 


Edw. F. Healy . 


Canton 


Wm. H. Gallivan . 


4 


1 . . . . 


Geo. G. Wilkins . 


Carlisle 


Geo. G. Wilkins 


3 


3 . 
6 . 


James S. McKay 
Albert L. Veber . 


Carver . 
Charlemont 


James S. McKay 
- 


5 
- 


4 . 


Marcus W. Carpenter . 


Charlton 


Thos. Ash worth 


6 


3 . 


Geo. W. Ryder . 


Chatham . 


Mervyn R. Martin . 


5 


1 . . . . 


Herbert M. Sturtevant 


Chelmsford 


Chas. R. Forsythe . 


3 


- 


- 


Chelsea 


J. A. O'Brien . 


1 


5 . 


Daniel L. Wood . 


Cheshire 


- 


- 


5 . 


Wm. H. Babb . 


Chester 


- 


- 


5 . 


Wm. H. Baker, Jr. . 


Chesterfield 


- 


- 


4 . 


Frank J. Thetreault . 


Chicopee 


Edw. Bourbeau 


6 


3 . 


Robert W. Vincent . 


Chilmark 


Almon S. Tilton 


5 


5 . 


A. G. Caswell . 


Clarksburg . 


A. G. Caswell . 


6 


4 . 


Andrew J. Robinson . 


Clinton 


Peter R. Gibbons 


2 


o 


Wm. J. Brennock 


Cohasset 


Joseph E. Grassie 


5 


6 . . . V 


F. A. Walden 


Colrain 


E. F. Copeland . 


6 




Harry E. Tuttle . 


Concord 


H. P. Richardson 


2 


6 . 


Edgar Jones 


Conway 






5 . . . ' "'7; 


Wm. H. Mansell . 


Cummington 






5 . . • ., . 


John M. Caesar . 


Dalton 






4 . 


Leroy H. Thayer 


Dana 


Thos. L. Thayer 


6 


1 . . 


Michael H. Barry 


Danvers 


T. E. Tinsley . 


1 


2 . . 


C. H. Brownell . 


Dartmouth . 


E. M. Munson . 


4 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 75 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


2 . 




Henry J. Harrigan 


Dedham 


J. T. Kennedy . 


4 


6 . 




Wm. L. Harris 


Deerfield 


Wm. L. Harris . 


6 


3 . 




Chas. E. Pierce 1 . 


Dennis 


Joseph R. He fen 


5 


2 




Ralph Earl . 


Dighton 


Albert N. Goff . 


4 


4 . 




Wm. L. Church . 


Douglas 


F. J. Libby 


6 


2 . 




Richard T. Breagy 


Dover 


H. L. MacKenzie 


4 


1 . 




Frank H. Gunther 


Dracut 


T. F. Carrick . 


3 


4 . 




Gilbert Gion 


Dudley 


Herbert J. Hill . 


6 


1 . 




Archie W. Swallow 


Dunstable . 


W. H. Savill 


2 


3 . 




H. E. Merry 


Duxbury 


John D. Morrison 


5 


3 . 




Allan B. Shaw . 


East Bridgewater 


Allan B. Shaw . 


5 


4 . 




Arthur LeDoux . 


East Brookfield . 


Milton A. Putnam 


6 


4 . 




Herman W. King 


E. Longmeadow 


Herman W. King 


6 


3 . 




Adin L. Gill 


Eastham 


Wm. B. Higgins 


5 


5 . 




John M. Dineen . 


Easthampton 


Chas. Kuhfuss . 


6 


2 . 




Daniel F. Lordan 


Easton 


R. W. Melendy . 


4 


-3 . 




Manuel S. Roberts 


Edgartown 


John P. Fuller . 


5 


5 . 




Frank Bradford . 


Egremont 






4 . 




Clinton Powell . 


Enfield 


H. C. Moore 


6 


6 . 




Chas. H. Holmes 


Erving . 


Chas. H. Holmes 


6 


1 . 




Otis 0. Story 


Essex 


Otis 0. Story 


1 




- 




Everett 


Dana Hanson . 


2 


2 . 




H. T. Howard . 


Fairhaven 


G. W. King 


4 


2 . 




Wm. Stevenson . 


Fall River . 


Wm. Stevenson . 


4 


3 . 




Herbert H. Lawrence 


Falmouth 


W. W. Eldridge, Jr. . 


5 


6 . 




Guy A. Hubbard 


Fitchburg 


Guy A. Hubbard 


2 


5 . 




H. B. Brown 


Florida 






-2 . 




Frank C. Carpenter 


Foxborough 


C. W. Parkhurst 


4 


1 




B. P. Winch 


Framingham 


N. I. Bowditch 


4 


2 . 




Ernest L. Metcalf 


Franklin 


J. W. Stobbart . 


4 


2 . 




Lyman B. Grinnell 


Freetown 


Lyman B. Grinnell . 


4 


6 . 




Geo. S. Hodgman 


Gardner 


Chas. J. Crabtree 


6 


3 . 




Nelson A. Francis 


Gay Head . 


Nelson A. Francis 


5 


1 . 




Leslie P. Merrill . 


Georgetown 


Jacob Hazen 


3 


6 . 




Lewis C. Munn . 


Gill 


Warren R. Purple 


6 


1 . 




Harland W. Dann 


Gloucester . 


Harland W. Dann 


1 


5 . 




Frank L. Rice 


Goshen 







Deceased. 



76 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


N'o? 


3 . 


Frederick A. Veeder . 


Gosnold 






4 . 


Elmer E. bibley . 


Grafton 


C. K. Despeau . 


6 


4 . 


Chas. JN. Kust 


Granby 


George A. Harris 


6 


5 . 


A. C. Sheets 


Granville 






5 . 


T~\««:~l WT 171..,^, 

Daniel W. llynn 


Great Barrington 


Daniel W. Flynn 


6 


6 . 


John \V . J5ragg 


/-i _____ « _. ■ j 
irreennela 


John \> . .Bragg 





A 

4 . 


V\m. it. Walker 


Greenwich . 


Thos. Severance, Jr. . 


m 




1 

I . 


A. A. wood 


Groton 


Shadrach Evans 


2 




(jreo. \j. .Nelson . 


Groveland 


K. 1). Larive 


i- 
o 


4 . 


Edward P. West . 


Hadley 


L,eroy C bavin . 


• 




. 


Geo. H. Armstrong 


xiaiiiax 


John A. W ood 


5. 


1 . 


Fred Berry . 


Hamilton 


Marry K. .McCregor . 


1 
1 


4 . 


John Swenson 


Hampden 






5 . - C.'iAl 


A It red Katnbun . 


Hancock 






3 . 


Louis E. Stone . 


Hanover 


Basil S. Simmons 


e 

{>• 


3 . 


Simeon Thompson 


Hanson 


Simeon Thompson 


K 




4 . 


George J. Fay 


Hardwick 


George J. Fay 


ft 
D 


4 . 


George C. Maynard 


Harvard 


George C. Maynard . 


2 


o 

O . 


John Condon 


Harwich 


Arthur F. Cahoon 


fj 


5 . 


rred 1. riardwell 


Hatfield 


Seth >\ . Kingsley 





1 . 


John B. Gordon . 


Haverhill 


M. J. Fitzgerald 


3 


6 . 


II 1 . K II 1 I 

Herbert A. riolden 


Hawley 






6 . . . . 


S. G. Benson 


Heath . 






3 . 


Wm. L. Howard . 


Hingham 


1 . L. Murphy . 


K 



5 . 


Alfred .N . VI arren 


Hinsdale 






2 . . . . 


Melvin L. Coulter 


Holbrook 


l reuencK »> . n Dit- 


A, 








comb. 




4 . 


Fred F. Taylor . 


Holden 


Winfred H. Stearns 


6 


4 . . . . , »i 


Arthur F. Blodgett 


Holland 


Arthur r . Jolodgett 


c 
O 


12 


Walter A. Collins 


Holliston 


Herbert E. Jones 


o 

L 


5 . 


C. J. Haley 


Holyoke 


John F. Kennedy 


a 



4 . 


a. kj. Kellogg 


Hopedale 


C* 1 T? Viiftinir 

. ii.. ^>uiiing 


6 




George W. Smith 


Hopkinton . 


W. A. Macmillan 


6 


4 . 


Wm. F. Noone . 


Hubbardston 


Chas. P. Wyman 


6 


1 . 


M. P. Mitchell . 


Hudson 


T. J. Higgins . 








Hull 


John F. Smith . 


5 


5 . 


John Kirby 


Huntington 








Thomas R. Roberts . 


Ipswich 


Francis C. Wade 





1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 77 



List of Forest Warden's and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


3 . 


Roland Bailey . 


Kingston 


Chas. H. Childs 


5 


3 . 


Nathan F. Washburn 


Lakeville 


Leavitt C. Caswell . 


5 


4 . 


Arthur W. Blood 


Lancaster 


L. R. Griswold . 


2 


5 . 


King D. Keeler . 


Lanesborough 


_ _ 


_ 


1 . 


Francis J. Morris 


Lawrence 


Edward Flynn . 


3 


5 . 


James W. Bossidy 


Lee 


_ _ 


_ 


4 . 


John E. Fitzpatrick 


Leicester 


J. H. Woodhead 


6 


5 . 


0. R. Hutchinson 


Lenox . 


Wheeler A. Shepard- 


6 


6 . 


Frederick A. Russell . 


Leominster . 


son. 

D. E. Bassett . 


2 


6 . 


Fred Morrison 


Leverett 


I. H. Taylor . 


6 


1 . 


Osborne J. Gorman . 


Lexington . 


Osborne J. Gorman . 


3 


6 . 


A. G. Parks 


Leyden 


A. G. Parks 


6 


1 . 


John J. Kelliher . 


Lincoln 


John J. Kelliher 


2 


1 . 


A. E. Hopkins . 


Littleton 


A. E. Hopkins . 


2 


4 . 


Oscar C. Pomeroy 


Longmeadow 


_ _ 


_ 


1 . 


Edw. F. Saunders 


Lowell . 


J. G. Gordon 


3 


4 . 


Henry A. Munsing 


Ludlow 


Ashley M. Bucher 


6 


6 . 


Arthur Q. Emerson 


Lunenburg . 


Arthur Q. Emerson . 


2 


1 . 


John P. Morrissey 


Lynn 


John P. Morrissey 


1 


1 . 


F. C. Newhall . 


Lynnfield 


L. H. Twiss 


1 


1 . 


Watson B. Gould 


Maiden 


Watson B. Gould 


2 


1 . 


Peter A. Sheahan 


Manchester 


Peter A. Sheahan 


1 


2 . 


H. E. King . 


Mansfield 


E. H. Conant . 


4 


1 . 


Win. H. Atkins . 


Marblehead 


W. H. Stevens . 


1 


3 . 


Arthur J. Morse . 


Marion 


J. Allenach 


5 


1 . 


Edward C. Minehan . 


Marlborough 


M. E. Lyons 


2 


3 . 


Wm. G. Ford 


Marshfield . 


P. R. Livermore 


5 


3 . . 


Darius Coombs . 


Mashpee 


S. H. Peters 


5 


3 . . 


Chas. T. Dexter . 


Mattapoisett 


John S. Hammond . 


5 


1 . . . . 


Geo. H. Gutteredge . 


Maynard 


John F. Cleary . 


2 


2 . 


Allen Kingsbury 


Medfield 


G. L. L. Allen . 


4 




Thomas Qualey . 


Medford 


Hugh (j. Kennedy . 




2 . ^ 


John B. Durfee . 


Medway 


Cecil W. Lawrence . 


4 






Melrose 


J. J. McCullough 


3 


4 . 


Carl M. Taft 


Mendon 


F. M. Aldrich . 


6 


1 . ... 


Chas. R. Ford 


Merrimac 


Chas. R. Ford . 


3 




Thomas Dow 


Methuen 


A. H. Wagland . 


3 



7$ DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


3 . 


Harry J. Goodale 


Middleborough . 


John J. Fowler, Jr. . 


5 


5 . 


George E. Cook . 


Middlefield . 


- 


- 


1 . 


J. Allen Atwood . 


Middleton . 


Burton McGlauflin . 


1 


4 . 


Edward J. Burke 


Milford 


P. F. Fitzgerald 


6 


4 . 


Harry L. Snelling 


Millbury 


E. F. Roach 


6 


j 


Chas. La Croix . 


Millis . 


Everett L. Cold well . 


4 


4 . . : ' J 


Robert McLaughlin . 


Millville 


Patrick Britt, Sr. 


I 


2 . ' . 




Milton . 


Ralph E. Forbes 


4 


6 . ... 


E. C. Davis 


Monroe 






4 . 


O. E. Bradway . 


M orison 


Robert S. Fay . 


6 


€ . . ; 


Myron A. Wakefield . 


Montague . 


F. B. Gillette . 


6 


5 . 


Jasper H. Bills . 


Monterey 


- 


- 


5 - . . *-- J 


A. J. Hall . 


Montgomery 


- 


- 


5 . . . -"-?J 

- 


Howard Porter . 


Mount Washing- 
ton. 
Nahant 


- 

Herbert Coles . 


- 
1 


3 . . . 




Nantucket . 


W. M. Voorneveld . 


5 


1 . . . . 


John H. Neary . 


Natick . 


Jesse E. Wight . 


2 


2 




Needham 


George Twigg . 


4 


5 . 


Chas. S. Baker . 


New Ashiord 


- 




2 


Edward F. Dahill 


New Bedford 


C. F. Lawton . 


4 


4 . 


Frank A. Morse . 


New Brain tree . 


E. L. Havens 


6 




Edw. M. Stanton 


New Marlbor- 
ough. 
New Salem . 


- 


- 


6 . . . ■'l- 


Edwin A. Goodnow 


Frank Hamilton 


6 


l . . . 


Wm. P. Bailey . 


Newbury 


Percy Oliver 


3 


1 . 


Chas. P. Kelley . 


Newburyport 


Chas. P. Kelley 




1 . 


Walter B. Randlett 


Newton 


Chas. Benyon . 


2 


2 . . . %V 


Stephen C. Watson 


Norfolk 


J. Albert Buckley . 


4 


5 . . . f 




North Adams 


Jackson L. Temple . 


6 


1 . 


Wm. L. Smith . 


North Andover . 


Wm. L. Smith . 


3 


2 . 

4 . . . 


Oscar C. Hir bom- 


North Attlebor- 

ough. 
North Brookfield 


F. P. Toner 

S. B. Colburn . 


4 

6 




George H. Spear 


North Reading 


George E. Eaton 




5 . . . 


John H. Marlow . 


Northampton 


Chas. A. Maynard . 


6 


4 . . . - V J 


Frank Gates 


Northborough . 


T. P. Haskell . 


6 


4 . . . 


Daniel C. Duggan 


Northbridge 


A. F. Whitin . 


6 


6 . . . * f 


Fred W. Doane . 


Northfield . 


Fred W. Doane . 


6 


2 . 


George H. Storer 


Norton 


Albert S. Lincoln 


4 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 79 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


3 . 


Arthur Coombs . 


Norwell 


Fred M. Curtis . 


5 


2 . 


Frank W. Talbot 


Norwood 


Wm. P. Hammersley . 


4 


3 . 


George A. Smith 


Oak Bluffs . 


F. F. Blankenship . 


5 


4 . 


C. H. Trowbridge 


Oakham 


C. H. Trowbridge . 


6 


6 . 


Wm. Walsh . 


Orange 


Elbridge S. Blodgett . 


6 


3 . ... 


James Boland 


Orleans 


Albert A. Smith 


5 


5 . 


Wesley Deming . 


Otis 


- 


- 


4 . 


Arthur Allen 


Oxford . 


Eugene Wetherell 


6 


4 . 


James Summers . 


Palmer 


Arthur F. Bennett . 


6 


4 . . . ^ 


Henry H. Pike . 


Paxton 


H. S. Robinson 


6 


1 . . . 


John J. Callahan 


Peabody 


Jehn J. Callahan 


1 


4 . . . 


Austin L. Kimball 


Pelham 


Lei?h Weaver 


6 


3 . 


J. J. Shepherd . 


Pembroke 


Wm. C. Jones . 


5 


1 . 


Grant M. Palmer 


Pepperell 


John Tune 


2 


5 . 


Walter H. Pike . 


Peru 


- 


- 


4 . 


George Marsh 


Petersham . 


Daniel Broderick 


6 


6 . 


Wm. H. Cowlbeck 


Phillipston . 


Wm. H. Cowlbeck . 


6 


5 . 


Chas. L. Klein . 


Pittsfleld 


- 


- 


5 . 


E. H. Nye . 


Plainfield . 




- 


2 . 


Frank V. Herrick 


Plainville . 


George H. Snell 


4 


3 . . 


Ira C. Ward 


Plymouth . 


A. A. Raymond 


5 


3 . 


David L. Brie knell . 


Plympton 


David L. Bricknell . 


5 


4 . 


Fred W. Doubleday . 


Prescott 


Harrison D. Pierce 


6 


4 . 


Fred W. Bryant . 


Princeton 


F. A. Skinner . 


6 


3 . 


James H. Barnett 


Provincetown 


F. G. Hill . 


5 


2 . 


Alfred L. Mead . 


Quincy 


A. J. Stewart 


4 


2 . 


Fred Dianto 


Randolph . 


John F. Moore . 


4 


2 . 


James C. Williams 


Baynham 


James C. Williams . 


4 


1 . 


Orville 0. Ordway 


Beading 


H. M. Donegan 


3 


2 . 


B. F. Munroe 


Behoboth . 


Chas. B. Douglas 


4 






Bevere . 


Walter A. Sancrie 


1 


5 . 


Timothy B. Salmon . 


Bichmond . 






3 . 


Daniel E. Hartley 


Bochester . 


Maxwell Gifford 


5 


3 . 


John H. Burke . 


Rockland 


F. H. Shaw 


5 


1 . 


John C. Martin . 


Bockport 


F. A. Babcock . 




6 . 


Merritt A. Peck . 


Bowe . 






1 . 


Daniel O'Brien . 


Rowley 


Chas. Curtis 


3 



80 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


6 . 


M. E. Stockwell 


Royalston 


E. S. Stewart 


g 


5 . 


Wm. C. Chadwick 


Russell 






4 


H. Edw. Wheeler 


Rutland 


H. Edw. Wheeler 


6 






Salem 


Oliver G. Pratt . 


1 


1 . 


Ciias J Penniman 


Salisbury 


Chas. J. Penniman 


3 


5 . 


Chas. D. Strickland 


Sandisfield 






6 . 


J. R. Hoi way 


Sandwich 


Lincoln Crowell 


5 


1 . 


Harry Saxon 


Saugus 


T. E. Berrett 


1 


. 


C. E. Tilton 


Savoy 






■J 

o . . • • 


CM. Litchfield 


Scituate 


Wm. F. Ford . 


5 


2 


H. S. Baker 


Seekonk 


C. A. Smith 


4 


2 


W. C. Morse 


Sharon 


Fred A. White . 


4 


5 


R. M. Smith 


Sheffield 






6 . 


Chas. S. Dole . 


Shelburne . 


Chas. S. Dole . 


6 


l . 


FYpH T T")incrlf>v 


Sherborn 


Geo. W. Rock 


2 




Asa A. Adams • 


Shirley 


Asa A. Adams . 


2 


4 * 


Edw. A. Logan 


Shrewsbury 


Robt. C. Clapp 


6 


6 


C. X. Mellen 


Shutesbury 


E. C. Johnson . 


6 


2 


F. B. Butterwort 


Somerset 
Somerville 


Chas. Riley 

A. B. Prichard . 


4 

2 




E A! Shtimwfly 


South Hadley 


E. M. Shumway 


6 


c 

o . . . 


W J Lyman 


Southampton 








Eugen© Closson 


Southborough 


Harry Burnett . 


6 




Aixn.ee Langevin 


Southbridge 


Aimee Langevin 


6 


c 

O . 




Southwick 








E. J. Potter 


Spencer 


Geo. Ramer 


6 


,1 

■T . 


F r o n L- p ftmith 


Springfield 


L. Fletcher Prouty 


6 


A 

4 . 


Tnol T Wilder 


Sterling 


J. H. Kilburn . 


2 


. 




Stockbridge 


George Schneyer 


6 


1 . . . 


AlDcil O. OlIllLll 


Stoneham 


G. M. .lefts 


3 


2 


Frpfi H Pvp 


Stoughton . 


W. P. Kennedy 


4 


1 . 


Harold A. Priest 


Stow 


H. W. Herrick . 


2 


4 . 


CM. Clarke 


Sturbridge . 


(_/. fli. Clarke 


6 




Seneca W. Hall . 


Sudbury 


Chas. A. Brackett 


2 


6 . 


A. C. Warner 


Sunderland 


Richard Graves 


6 


4'. 


R. H. Richardson 


Sutton 


R. H. Richardson 


6 




Everett P. Mudge 


Swampscott 


Everett P. Mudge . 


1 



1922.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 81 



List of Forest Wardens axd Local Moth Superintendents — Con. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent . 


Div. 

JNo. 






Arthur E. Arnold 


Swansea 


-Arthur E. Arnold 


4 


o 




Fred A. Leonard 


Taunton 


II. M. Briggs . 


4 


6 . 




C. A. Fletcher . 


Templeton . 


J. B. Wheeler . 


6 


1 . 




Alden S. Haines . 


Tewksbury . 


H. M. Briggs . 


3 


o 

a . 




Lester H. Bumpus 


Tisbury 


H. W. McLellan 


5 


5 . 




Rupert E. Clark 


Tolland 


- 


_ 


1 . 




Way land E. Burnham 


Topsfield . 


Wayland E. Burnham 


1 


. 




Frederick J. Piper 


Townsend . 


Wm. W. Copeland 


2 


6 . 




Walter F. Rich . 


Truro . 


J. H. Atwood 


5 


1 . 




C. J. Allgrove . 


Tyngsborough . 


C. J. Allgrove . 


3 


i) . 




George R. Warner 


Tyringham . 


- 


_ 


A 

i 




H. E. Allard 


Upton . 


Clarence L. Goodrich 


6 


A 

4 . 




Thomas F. Casey 


Uxbridge 


Frank J. O'Brien 


6 






Fred D. Graham 


Wakefield 


John A. Landrey 


3 






L. H. Thompson 


Wales . 


If. C. Royce . 


6 


2 




Chester L. Donnell 


Walpole 


Elton F. Durfee 


4 






George L. Johnson 


Waltham 


W. M. Ryan . 


2 


4 




Alfred II . Pigeon 


Ware 


F. Zeissig . 


6 




. 




James J. Walsh . 


Wareham 


James J. Walsh . 


5 






T. M. Collins 


Warren 


Nathan H. Powers . 


6 


6 




C. A. Williams . 


Warwick 


Chas. Bass 


6 


5 




A. L. Hayes 


Washington 


_ 


_ 






John W. O'Hearn 


Watertown . 


Van D. Horton . 


2 






Howard C. Haynes 


Wayland 


D. J. Graham . 


2 


4 




John C. Templeman . 


Webster 


Clark C. Klebart 


6 


o 




John P. Doyle . 


Wellesley 


Thos. T. Watt . 


4 


3 




Frank Fisher 


Wellfleet 


Wm. H. Gill . 


5 


6 




Henry Champlin 


Wendell 


G. E. Mills 


6 


1 . 




Jacob D. Barnes 


Wenham 


Jacob D. Barnes 




4 . 




Harry E. Lowe 


West Boylston . 


Harry E. Lowe . 


6 


3 . 




W. P. Laughton . 


West Bridgewater 


Christopher Read 


5 


4 . 




John H. Webb . 


West Brookfield . 


John H. Webb 


g 






Edward Johnston 


West Newbury . 


Frank D. Bailey 


3 


5 . 




Walter L. Haines 


West Springfield 


George W. Hayden 


6 


5 . 




Benj. P. Bissell . 


West Stockbridge 






3 . 




Henry B. Davis . 


West Tisbury 


Jerry B. Mayhew 


5 


4 . 




Thos. W. Humphrey . 


Westborough 


George E. Hayden . 


6 



82 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 1922. 

List of Forest Wardens and Local Moth Superintendents — Co??. 



District 
Number. 


Forest Warden. 


Town or City. 


Local Moth 
Superintendent. 


Div. 
No. 


5 . 


T. H. Mahoney . 


Westfield 


- 


_ 


1 . 


H. L. Nesmith . 


Westford 


H. L. Nesmith . 


3 


5 . 


Myron M. Clapp 


Westhampton 


- 


_ 


6 . 


W. F. Neal . 


Westminster 


G. A. Sargent . 


6 


1 . 


B. R. Parker 


Weston 


E. P. Ripley . 


2 


2 . 


Christopher Borden . 


Westport 


Christopher Borden . 


4 


2 . 


Elmer E. Smith . 


Westwood . 


Martin Sorenson 


4 


2 . 


Philip W. Wolfe . 


Weymouth . 


C. L. Merritt . 


4 


6 . 


J. J. Phinn . 


Whately 


Rylan C. Howes 


6 


3 . 


Clarence A. Randall . 


Whitman 


Clarence A. Randall . 


5 


4 . 


Henry I. Edson . 


Wilbraham . 


Henry I. Edson 


6 


5 . 


Arthur J. Polmatier . 


Williamsburg 


- 


_ 


5 . 


Armedee Remillard . 


Williamstown 


Daniel J. Connor 


6 


1 . 


E. L. Day . 


Wilmington 


Oliver McGrane 


3 


6 . 


Theron C. Flint . 


Winchendon 


Waldo F. Streeter 


6 


1 . 


David H. DeCourcy . 


Winchester . 


S. S. Symmes . 


3 


5 . 


Amos S. Ferry . 


Windsor 


- 


H i 


- 


- 


Winthrop 


Harry Hills 


l 




Frank E. Tracy . 


Woburn 


Wm. Butler Jones 


3 


4 . . . 


Edw. L. Janes . 


Worcester 


Thos. E. Holland 


6 


5 . 


Chas. A. Kilbourn 


Worthington 






2 . ... 


Geo. H. E. Mayshaw . 


Wrentham . 


Ernest B. Mayshaw . 


4 


3 . 


Henry R. Usher 


Yarmouth . 


Frank B. Homer 


5 





ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF CONSERVATION 

AND I fcC V 

STATE FORESTER 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1922 



Department of Conservation 




BOSTON 

)TTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 
32 DERNE STREET 



Public Document No. 73 



Cfte Commontoealtb of s&assacbumts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



COMMISSIONER OF CONSERVATION 



STATE FORESTER 



Year ending November 30, 1922 



• Department of Conservation 



? 




/ 



BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 
32 DERNE STREET 

k 



MASS. OFFICIALS 



Publication of this Document 
approved by the 
Commission on Administration and Finance. 



* % 

9*i - 



4 3*f.9(36M3 

3 



Cfje Commontoealtf) of ^mmcbmtm 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

I respectfully present herewith for your consideration my 
third annual report as Commissioner of Conservation for the 
fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1922. 

WILLIAM A. L. BAZELEY. 



/ 



CONTENTS. 



Part I. 

Report of the Commissioner op Conservation. 



page 

Conservation of our Forests . . . . . . . . .11 

Conservation of Wild Life ......... 12 

Conservation of Domestic Animals ........ 13 

Forest Fires . . . . ... . . . . • .14 

Pin-chase of State Forests .......... 14 

October Mountain Forest .......... 15 

Standish Monument Reservation ........ 17 

White Pine Blister Rust 17 

Lectures and Conventions . . . . . . . . .19 

Recommendations for Legislation : 

Division of Forestry . . . . . . . . . .19 

Division of Fisheries and Game . . . . . . . .21 

Part II. 

Report of the Division of Forestry. 
New Legislation ... . . . . . . . . .27 

Organization . . . . . . . . . . . .27 

State Plantations ........... 29 

Nurseries . . . . . . . . . . . 30 

Examinations ............ 32 

Forest Survey 32 

State Forests 33 

Report of State Fire Warden 40 

Gypsy Moth Work 46 

Brown-tail Moth . . . . . . . . . . .46 

State Highway Trees .......... 47 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts . . . . . .47 

Special North Shore Work 48 

Financial Statement .......... 49 

Appendix. 

Financial Statement .......... 53 

Receipts and Expenditures on State Forests . . . . . .54 

Distribution of Supplies .......... 55 

Summary of Town Expenditures and Reimbursements . . . . .57 



OUTLINE OF REPORT 



This report is divided for convenience and economy into 
four parts : — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of 

Conservation. 
Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 
Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 
Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume as Public Docu- 
ment No. 73. 

Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document 
No. 25. 

Part IV is printed in a separate volume as Public Document 
No. 98. 



Part I 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CONSERVATION 



Cfte Commontoealti) of 6©a00acfm0ett0 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF CONSERVATION 



It is gratifying to report that during the past year the work 
of the three divisions that constitute the Department of Con- 
servation has made good progress. The sustained interest of 
citizens of the Commonwealth in the activities of the Depart- 
ment is appreciated, as is also the prompt response of the 
General Court to our recommendations for legislation designed 
to strengthen, promote and facilitate the work of conservation. 
We also desire to place on record our thanks for the unremit- 
ting interest and valuable aid of the State House news service 
in giving publicity to the more important phases of the Depart- 
ment's work in the newspapers of the Commonwealth which 
has resulted in an aroused public opinion in matters relating to 
conservation, especially with respect to the forest fire evil. 

As in former years the Commissioner and the Directors of 
divisions (in their advisory capacity) held frequent meetings 
throughout the year to discuss important questions and to 
determine policies which should be pursued in the solution of 
problems of more than ordinary moment. Twenty-three such 
meetings have been held. Complete records were kept of the 
business transacted at these meetings and they are filed in the 
office of the Department for future reference. 

Conservation of Our Forests. 
Less than twenty years ago in Massachusetts forestry was 
an obscure and little talked of subject. Yet there are few, if 
any, questions before the people of this Commonwealth to-day 
of greater importance than the preservation and restoration of 



12 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



the forests. The practice of scientific forestry is now almost 
universally recognized to be an economic necessity. 

When we reflect upon the fact that Massachusetts once pro- 
duced from her own soil all the timber needed for our wood- 
using industries and for construction purposes, but is now im- 
porting 80 per cent of the amount used, it is easily understood 
why the citizens of Massachusetts should give to the subject 
of forestry their most serious consideration and support. 

In Massachusetts we have more than a million acres of non- 
agricultural land suitable only for forest growth that can be 
made to yield enormous profits, but do not. A liberal forestry 
program contemplates the utilization of these lands for the 
production of commercial trees. 

Conservation of Wild Life. 
It is a trite statement that the increase of population within 
a given area calls for an increasing readjustment of the wild 
life on that area to changed conditions. This can be interest- 
ingly illustrated from the standpoint of forestry and fisheries 
and game by pointing to the fact that by reason of deforesta- 
tion certain of our waters have become unfit for the fish which 
formerly frequented them, to the point that it is now necessary 
to look about for other species that can survive. A notable 
example is the experiment now being carried on with the 
brown trout to replace the brook trout in those streams which, 
by reason of deforestation, have become too warm for those 
native fish. Again, on those extensive areas which, through 
deforestation, are no longer available to the ruffed grouse, a 
foreign species, namely, the ring-neck pheasant, has been 
resorted to as the one remaining hope of populating those 
regions with a game bird. As our native species have auto- 
matically ceased to exist in those localities where conditions 
have been rendered unsuitable, they will, in time, as automati- 
cally return, provided their natural environment is restored. 
The foregoing propositions have been sufficiently proven in 
the past fifteen years to warrant their being accepted as facts. 
It should be heartening to all lovers of wild life to realize that, 
in addition to the very great economic advantages of refores- 
tation, there lies the prospect that as the trees grow the birds 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



13 



and beasts and fish will return. The work of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game was of a greater volume in proportion to 
the increase of appropriations. The hunting and fishing 
license fees were practically doubled, providing about $66,000 
of additional revenue. The appropriations, however, were 
increased but $17,130, thus bringing the Division much nearer 
to the self-supporting basis. The year's work, in brief, may 
be characterized as a continuation of established activities, 
conducted with the object of producing a greater amount of 
fish and game for distribution without an increase of labor or 
funds in the process. 

Conservation of Domestic Animals. 

The several species of domestic animals are very susceptible 
to various types and kinds of contagious disease. The con- 
servation work of the Division of Animal Industry is in preven- 
tion, control and eradication of these diseases. 

When we consider that certain of our domestic animals, 
cattle, sheep and swine furnish a large portion of our food 
supply by their products during life or by their carcasses when 
slaughtered; that they are also vitally necessary to successful 
agriculture; and that a large business industry with many 
ramifications of trade depends on their production, it can 
readily be seen that they must be maintained free from disease 
in order that they may propagate in large numbers and rapidly 
develop to the point where they are of economic value. 

Contrary to general opinion, we have nearly 9,000 more 
dairy cows in Massachusetts than a year ago, the present 
number exceeding that of any year since 1909. The Division 
is doing a new work in the eradication of bovine tuberculosis 
under the tuberculin testing law passed by the Legislature of 
1922, and the indications point to permanent progress in that 
direction. 

The horse is still the economic power of the average New 
England farm, and he is as yet indispensable in many lines of 
trade. His use as a means of recreation and pleasure is still a 
popular one, although he is displaced by the motor vehicle in 
many instances. A great value attaches to him in the pro- 
duction of several biological preparations now used in the 



14 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



prevention and cure of many diseases of the human subject; 
consequently he must still be raised in large numbers and main- 
tained free from contagious disease. 

We refer to the accompanying report of the Director of 
Animal Industry for a detailed description of the conservation 
activities of this Division. 

Forest Fires. 

Fire, the great enemy of the forests, has ravaged the State 
with unusual severity during the past year. This was due to 
a combination of unfortunate circumstances, beyond the control 
of man, that included high winds, extreme spring drought and 
the vast amount of debris which littered the forest ground as 
a result of last year's ice storm. Had it not been for the 
splendid functioning of our system of forest-fire prevention we 
doubtless should have been compelled to record unparalleled 
losses. Naturally, time is the most important factor in the 
control of fires. If fires are discovered in their incipient stage 
they are easily extinguished. Thus the most important in our 
system of prevention are the observation stations, of which 
there are 39 in operation. These towers are situated on the 
highest altitudes in the State, and are so distributed as to 
bring under surveillance its entire area. The promptness and 
accuracy of our observers in locating and reporting fires during 
the past season saved many valuable areas of forest land that 
otherwise would have been destroyed. Our report shows that 
out of 4,099 fires reported, 3,641 burned over less than 10 acres 
each, 330 from 10 acres to 100 each, 96 from 100 to 500 acres, 
and only 32 burned over more than 500 acres. 

Purchase of State Forests. 
Our State forest area was increased during the year by the 
purchase of 18,439 acres. Four thousand acres represent addi- 
tions to existing forests, and 13,000 acres represent five new 
State forests. Purchases of 17,000 acres were made from the 
general appropriation for the purchase and development of 
State forests, and represent that much progress on our program 
to acquire 100,000 acres of State forests in fifteen years. In 
addition, 1,400 acres were added to the Mohawk Trail Forest 



1923.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



15 



and 62 acres to the Mount Grace Forest purchased from bal- 
ances of appropriations made in 1920 and 1921 for these 
purposes. The price paid for land bought for State forests 
from the regular purchase and development appropriation 
averaged $4.50 per acre. 

Forest Land purchased during Fiscal year of 1922. 
Under Chapter 132, General Laws. 



Additions to already existing forests : Acres. 

Myles Standish State Forest 293 

Otter River State Forest 40 

Savoy Mountain State Forest 1,428 

Beartown State Forest 50 

Erving State Forest 448 

Shawme State Forest 709 

Tolland-Granville State Forest 230 

Wendell State Forest 830 

4,028 

New State forests: 

Leominster State Forest 141 

Oakham State Forest 142 

October Mountain State Forest 11,477 

Pittsfield State Forest 885 

Sandisfield State Forest 240 

Unassigned lots 50 

12,935 

Under Chapter 3U, Acts of 1921. 

Additional land: 

Mohawk Trail State Forest 1,414 

Under Chapter 606, Acts of 1920. 

Additional land: 

Mount Grace State Forest 62 



Total for year 18,439 



October Mountain Forest. 
The most interesting acquisition of the past year was the 
purchase of the Whitney Preserve in the towns of Washington, 
Becket, Lenox and Lee. This property of 10,000 acres was 
acquired by the late William H. Whitney of New York more 
than thirty years ago as a summer estate and game preserve. 
It was the largest tract of land in the State under one owner- 



16 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



ship, and ever since the policy of acquiring State forest was 
initiated it has been the desire, both of the State Forester and 
of others interested in this work, to see this property come 
into the hands of the Commonwealth. The stumbling block 
was the price, for we are limited to an expenditure of $5 per 
acre, while the Whitney Estate valued the property at about 
twice that rate. 

A committee of influential people in Berkshire County, led 
by Col. K. B. Miller, proprietor of the "Pittsfield Eagle," 
assisted by the generosity of Mr. Harry Payne Whitney, was 
able to raise the amount necessary to pay for this property 
over and above the amount that this Department could pay 
($50,000), and this fine tract was thus purchased by the Com- 
monwealth. To add to the value of this acquisition, Mrs. 
Ellen S. Auchmuty of Lenox made a gift to the Commonwealth 
of 1,000 acres of valuable forest land adjoining the Wliitney 
property on the west side, and the Department obtained by 
purchase the 500 acre Dewey tract which adjoins both the 
Auchmuty and Whitney properties, and thus was created a 
State forest of 11,500 acres, probably the largest that we shall 
ever acquire. 

Within the borders of the October Mountain Forest the city 
of Pittsfield owns 2,000 acres of land formerly taken from the 
Whitney Preserve to protect the city's water supply, so that 
we may well claim that this is a public forest of 13,500 acres. 

The Commissioner of Conservation has been the subject of 
some criticism because he has permitted hunting on this forest, 
whereas while it was owned by the Whitney family all hunting 
was prohibited. The foundation of our policy in the manage- 
ment of these forests is that they shall serve the greatest 
number of people. With the increasing tendency on the part 
of private landowners to post their lands against hunting and 
fishing the time is fast coming when the sportsman of small 
means will have no place to hunt or fish unless he does it on 
State forests. 

Some forests have already been set aside as game refuges 
and their number may be increased if game protection and 
propagation demand it, but as a general policy, State forests 
will be left open to hunting and fishing under the regular 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



17 



laws. As head of the Department of Conservation, both for- 
ests and fish and game come under his direction, and the 
Commissioner is desirous of doing the best thing possible for 
the forests, both public and private, and for the sportsmen, 
both rich and poor. 

Staxdish Monument Reservation. 

During a severe electrical storm which occurred on Saturday, 
August 26, the monument on Captain's Hill was struck by 
lightning and severely damaged. The statue of Captain Mylc s 
Standish, of heroic size, which surmounts the monument, was 
nearly ruined, the head being completely broken off and hurled 
to the ground. The estimated cost of repairs is placed at 
$10,000, for which a special appropriation should be made by 
the General Court. 

Minor repairs to the tower and stairs were made during the 
months succeeding the accident, and for this purpose funds on 
hand and a special fund provided by the Governor, from 
emergency appropriations, were used. 

According to the report of the caretaker, Mr. Wilfred C. 
Dawes, the Sunday following the accident the monument was 
visited by 1,800 people, and the two succeeding Sundays 2,000 
and 2,306 visitors were recorded. The total number of visitors 
to the reservation during the year was 44,564, and the number 
of automobiles was 11,141. The sentiment felt by both tour- 
ists and natives for this historic reservation is thus attested. 

White Pine Blister Rust. 
The work of controlling the spread of this disease is in the 
hands of the Department of Agriculture, but a forestry report 
hardly seems complete unless it contains some mention of this 
very important disease. For this reason we have asked Mr. 
C. C. Perry, agent in charge of blister rust work, to make the 
statement which follows : — 

This disease as reported in Massachusetts seems to be confined par- 
ticularly to several well-defined areas, in which the condition might be 
described as local-general-infection, meaning that the disease can be 
found quite extensively within the township or any large portion thereof. 
Such areas are found in sections of Berkshire, Essex, Hampden and Ph m- 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



outh counties. In addition to these areas there have been found 
scattered spot infections consisting of isolated trees or groups of a few 
trees. On Jan. 1, 1922, the records indicate that the disease had been 
found in Massachusetts, in at least one of its stages of development, in 
269 towns, in 92 of which it had been reported on pine. Since that time, 
however, infection on pine has been found in 32 additional towns, making 
a grand total of 124. 

Control work in Massachusetts has been conducted by the State 
Department of Agriculture, in co-operation with the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, as in the past, but on account of a radical change in 
the policy of the Federal department, the work this year has been con- 
ducted along somewhat different lines. In brief, the plan adopted was 
based upon an appreciation of the fact that the average pine owner has 
been entirely unfamiliar with the nature and characteristics of the disease, 
the damage it may do, the comparatively simple matters by which its 
further spread can be prevented, and the relatively low cost of control 
work, when considered on the basis of an annual insurance premium for 
the protection of white pine as a crop. The Federal department, there- 
fore, agreed to conduct an intensive educational campaign by the assign- 
ment of Federal agents to the more important pine-producing districts 
in the State, to undertake this work of disseminating information regarding 
the disease and its control. The State Department of Agriculture in 
carrying out its obligation agreed to aid the pine owner by furnishing a 
number of scouts and foremen to direct the field work. 

In following out this policy, the State has been divided into nine dis- 
tricts, and eight Federal agents have been assigned during the year and 
have been assisted by twenty-one temporary State employees. In con- 
ducting the work the general plan followed lias been to first examine the 
land of co-operating pine owner without charge. If the examination 
disclosed the presence of ribes (currants or gooseberries), — the alternate 
host of the disease, — a report has been made to the owner and he has 
been requested to furnish additional men to perform the eradication 
work under the supervision of a State foreman or scout, the owner bearing 
the expense of the laborers and the State department providing the 
services of the foreman. Although there were many delays incident to 
the organization under the new plan, nearly 200 pine owners have actually 
performed control work for the protection of their pine holdings, and 
approximately 61,600 acres of land have been examined and 1,565,662 
ribes destroyed. 

In addition to the State-wide work carried on by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, this Department had a crew of eight men 
eradicating ribes on the Tolland-Granville Forest during the 
summer, and scouted several other forests and plantations. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



19 



Lectures and Conventions. 

The demand for lectures seems to grow each year, and we 
hope that it represents a genuine increasing interest on the 
part of the public in our forest problems. In 1921 the Com- 
missioner and his assistants gave fifty lectures, while last year 
they numbered eighty-four. 

The Commissioner attended the following conventions: — 

Association of State Foresters, Minnesota. 
American Fish and Game Association, New York. 
National Park Conference, Bear Mountain, New York. 
New England Society of Foresters, Mount Wachusett, Mass. 
Massachusetts Tree Wardens and Foresters Association, Boston, Mass. 
Forest Fire Conference, Washington, D. C. 

Recommendations of the Department of Conservation. 
Division of Forestry. 
The Commissioner is of the opinion that the several statutes 
under which land for State forests is acquired and administered 
should be so amended as to make them uniform in all their 
essential features. Bills designed to accomplish this purpose 
have therefore been prepared. 

1. Amending the Act establishing the Mohawk Trail Reser- 
vation. — Chapter 344 of the Acts of 1921, authorizing the 
Commissioner to acquire lands lying on both sides of the so- 
called Mohawk Trail, does not provide, as in the case of the 
original State forest law (General Laws, chapter 132, section 30) 
that the Commissioner, in taking such lands by eminent 
domain, shall do so with the approval of the Governor and 
Council. Neither does it give him authority, as in the original 
act, to sell or exchange any land thus acquired, which in his 
judgment can no longer be used advantageously for the pur- 
poses for which it was acquired, or exchange it for other land 
which may be more valuable to the Commonwealth. The 
Commissioner, therefore, recommends legislation which will 
make the above acts correspond in these particulars. 

2. Amending Chapter 132, Section 33, General Laws. — Sec- 
tion 33 of chapter 132 of the General Laws, which provides 
for the acquisition by the Commissioner of Conservation of 



20 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



100,000 acres of land and their development into State forests 
should be amended so as to require the approval of the Gover- 
nor and Council when taking such land by eminent domain, 
and that such taking should be made under the provisions of 
chapter 79 of the General Laws. The Commissioner is of the 
opinion that said chapter should also give him authority to 
sell or exchange any land thus acquired which in his judgment 
can no longer be used advantageously, and should also give 
him authority to execute such deeds of conveyance as may be 
necessary. 

3. Amending Chapter 132, Section 30, General Laws. — Sec- 
tion 30 of chapter 132 of the General Laws, as amended by 
chapter 185 of the Acts of 1922, gives to the Commissioner, 
subject to the approval of the advisory council of the Depart- 
ment of Conservation, authority to sell or exchange any land 
which in his judgment can no longer be used advantageously 
for its original purposes, but does not specifically state that 
he may execute such deeds of conveyance as may be necessary. 
The Commissioner recommends the act be amended by the 
insertion of such a provision. 

4. Aid to Certain Towns for the Cost of extinguishing Forest 
Fires. — To many towns in the Commonwealth the cost of 
extinguishing forest fires has become a serious burden. Under 
the provisions of section 24 of chapter 48 of the General Laws, 
every town, the valuation of which does not exceed $1,250,000, 
which has expended a sum equal to one-tenth of 1 per cent of 
its valuation, is entitled to reimbursement from the State of 
50 per cent of any sum expended in excess of the above amount 
up to $250 in any one year. There are approximately 100 
towns in the Commonwealth that come within the provisions 
of this statute, and in these towns is probably 75 per cent of 
our valuable growing timber. The valuation of many of these 
towns is less than $500,000, and in such towns, notwithstanding 
the financial aid extended to them under the present law, the 
cost of extinguishing forest fires in many cases becomes prac- 
tically prohibitive. The imperative need of protecting from 
fire the forest growth in these towns is such as to cause the 
Commissioner to feel that the law should be so amended as to 
increase the assistance now given them, and he so recommends. 



1923.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



21 



Division of Fisheries and Game. 

1. To require a Fishing License to fish in All Inland Waters. — 
The present law requires a license for fishing in only those 
inland waters which have been stocked by this Department 
since Jan. 1, 1910. The publication yearly of lists of waters 
stocked during the year involves considerable expense. Fur- 
ther, by reason of the fact that many streams are known by 
various names, much confusion is created in the minds of 
persons who wish to determine whether a stream has or has 
not been stocked. Many of the unstocked waters are being 
depleted, and we believe they should be protected by requiring 
licenses for fishing therein. 

2. To make the Laws of Massachusetts relative to Migratory 
Birds conform with the Laws of the United States. — The Federal 
government has entered into a treaty with the Dominion of 
Canada for the uniform protection of migratory birds on the 
North American Continent. The Federal laws in this con- 
nection render conflicting State laws void. Very often there 
is great delay in prosecuting cases in the Federal courts where 
business is greatly congested. It is desirable that the State 
laws conform with the Federal laws in order that violators may 
be prosecuted in either jurisdiction. The benefits of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act are already a matter of common 
knowledge, and should have this additional support. 

3. To allow the Commissioner of Conservation to take Lands 
by Right of Eminent Domain for Fish and Game Refuges and 
Public Fishing and Hunting Grounds. — The land of the Com- 
monwealth is held by a comparatively small number of its 
citizens. The expense of propagating fish and game is borne 
primarily by those who hunt and fish as the result of the 
license system. However, a part of the funds is provided by 
the general treasury. The wild life of the Commonwealth 
belongs to all its people, but it lives on the land and in the 
waters controlled by the comparatively few. Under our laws 
the landowners have the right to exclude the public if they so 
desire. There should be some provision guaranteeing to the 
public permanent benefits from the annual investment of funds 
in this work. This protection can be best insured by estab- 
lishing public shooting grounds, game sanctuaries and public 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



fishing grounds which shall be open to the public at all times, 
under suitable regulation, on much the same status as our 
great ponds. 

4. To protect Shad in Palmer's River. — This river flows into 
Narragansett Bay in the State of Rhode Island. At the last 
session of the Rhode Island Legislature a law was passed 
giving substantial protection to the shad in their annual run 
from the sea to their spawning grounds. This law is not to go 
into effect until similar protective legislation has been passed 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

5. To alloio Persons in Charge of Public Lands to issue Per- 
mits for the Hunting and Trapping of Predatory Birds and 
Animals. — Under the present law all of the public lands are 
game refuges, and for the benefit of the useful birds and ani- 
mals within those reservations the persons in charge thereof 
should be empowered to issue permits allowing the hunting of 
predatory birds and animals which prey upon the birds and 
quadrupeds which are an economic asset. 

6. To prohibit the Sale of Trout and further protect the Brown 
and Rainbow Trout. — For many years the sale of wild trout 
has been prohibited, but when the General Laws were revised in 
1920 the phraseology was rearranged which makes it uncertain 
as to whether or not the sale of trout is actually forbidden. 
All question should be removed by clarifying the act, and the 
same protection should be extended to the brown trout and 
rainbow trout, both of which are being propagated. 

7. To give the Director the Right to regulate the Taking of New 
Species of Fish and Game ivhich he may introduce into the State 
for Experimental Purposes. — The Department is constantly on 
the alert to find new species of fish and game which will 
establish themselves and propagate in the streams, ponds and 
covers of the Commonwealth, and the Director should have the 
right to prohibit or regulate the taking of them during the 
experimental work. At the present time a new species is at 
the mercy of the public, as there are no laws to protect many 
kinds of fish and game. For illustration, in the spring of 1922, 
12,000 channel catfish were brought from Lake Erie. A por- 
tion was planted in the upper part of the Connecticut River, 
a portion in the Merrimack River and some in several ponds. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 73. 



23 



The channel catfish is not covered by our laws, and until it 
is ascertained whether the species will adapt itself to our 
waters it should be given such protection as will appear desir- 
able. It is impossible to state in advance when the oppor- 
tunity may be offered to obtain numbers of a given species of 
wild life. Often after their introduction, should it be necessary 
to wait until the Legislature can take action, the specimen 
may be completely destroyed, under existing conditions, before 
sufficient safeguards can be thrown around them. 

8. To extend the Close Seasons on- Pond Fish, to prohibit the 
Catching of them during the Winter, to provide a Close Season 
on Homed Pout, and to prohibit the Sale of Pond Fish where 
that is not already provided for. — The Division is convinced 
that the present demands on our fisheries are such that winter 
fishing and the sale of fresh-water fish must be prohibited if 
our waters are to continue to furnish a reasonable amount of 
fishing for the general public during the rest of the year. The 
horned pout is one of the most valuable food fishes in the 
Commonwealth, and should have equal protection during the 
breeding season to that given other species. 

9. To alloic the Department of Conservation to receive Property 
in Trust for the Propagation and Protection of Useful Wild 
Birds, Quadrupeds and Fish. — There is a growing disposition 
on the part of those interested in conservation to turn over to 
the Department of Conservation lands and personal property, 
including money, to carry on the work. The purpose of this 
legislation is to put the Department in a position to legally 
accept these gifts, and administer them in a way to meet the 
wishes of the donors. 



Part II 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY. 



During the past year the activities of this Division have 
proceeded as usual. Each year finds the Division concerned 
with a larger territory of State forests which must be cared 
for, surveyed, planted and administered, and it finds us with a 
completer system of forest fire towers and with larger and better 
equipped forest tree nurseries. All these testify to the activity 
of the Division, and are described in detail in this report. 

New Legislatiox. 

Two important matters of forest legislation were enacted 
by the General Court of 1922. 

The first was a forest taxation law petitioned for by the 
Massachusetts Forestry Association and which was the result 
of long study by an able committee appointed by that organi- 
zation. This law (chapter 360, Acts of 1922) supersedes the 
Forest Taxation Law of 1914 (chapter 61, General Laws), and 
accomplishes the same object sought in that act, namely, the 
separate classification of immature forest land for purposes of 
taxation with about one-tenth the text and one-fourth the red 
tape required by the old law. 

The second piece of legislation, somewhat misnamed, the 
Portable Sawmill Law, makes it mandatory for persons operat- 
ing in woodland where the product involves the cutting of 
more than 10,000 board feet to notify this Department. The 
object of this notification is to acquaint our district fire war- 
dens with the locations of logging operations, as these are 
places of high fire risk, and it also enables them to inspect the 
cuttings and see that the slash regulations are complied with. 

Organization. 

In April of this year the office in the western part of the 
State, at Springfield, under the auspices of the Hampden 
County Improvement League, was again opened. Mr. Dennis 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



C. A. Galarneau, who had been employed by the St. Maurice 
Paper Company of Quebec, and is a trained and experienced 
forester, was engaged to take charge of this office. His work 
consists of supervising certain work on the State forests in the 
western part of the State, of making forestry examinations 
there, and of speaking and giving advice on forestry matters 
in the office. 

The personnel of the Division has otherwise remained prac- 
tically unchanged. Several temporary surveyors and drafts- 
men have been employed on the State forests; as far as 
possible local surveyors have been employed, as these men are 
more familiar with the ground and can therefore do more 
economical work. 

The present organization, Nov. 30, 1922, is as follows: — 

William A. L. Bazeley .... Commissioner and State Forester. 



Forestry Division. 
General Staff. 

Charles O. Bailey Secretary. 

Elizabeth Hubbard Senior clerk. 

Elizabeth T. Harraghy .... Senior stenographer. 

Mabel R. Hamnett Senior clerk. 

Marguerite R. Gallagher . . . Clerk. 

Anna C. Brooks Junior stenographer. 



General 

Harold O. Cook .... 

Dennis C. A. Galarneau 

Frank L. Haynes .... 

James Morris 

Robert B. Parmenter 
John A. Palmer .... 
Fred W. Parker .... 
Eben Smith . . . . 



Forestry. 

. Chief forester. 

. Assistant forester. 

. Assistant forester. 

. Assistant forester. 

. Assistant forester. 

. Superintendent, Amherst Nursery. 

. Superintendent, Bridgewater Nursery. 

. Superintendent, Barnstable Nursery. 



Moth Work. 

George A. Smith Superintendent. 

Francis V. Learoyd ..... Business agent. 



District Moth Men. 



1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly. 

2. William A. Hatch, Marlborough. 

3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill. 



Clarence W. Parkhurst, Fox- 
borough. 

Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay. 
Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



29 



Forest Fire Prevention. 
Maxwell C. Hutchins .... State Fire Warden. 
Dorothy J. Sanford .... Clerk. 



District 

1. James E. Moloy, Woburn. 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River. 

3. Joseph J. Shepherd, Pembroke. 

4. John P. Crowe, Westborough. 



t Wardens. 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield. 

6. Joseph L. Peabody, Winchendon. 

7. Verne J. Fitzroy, Savoy. 



Observers and Location of Fire Towers. 



Mrs. John Condon, Harwich. 
Joseph W. Jenkins, Barnstable. 
Mrs. W. I. Moody, Falmouth. 
W. F. Raymond, Bourne. 
F. L. Buckingham, Kingston. 
Mrs. Allen Keniston, Marthas Vine- 
yard. 

S. Edward Matthews, Middleborough. 
George F. Moffett, Fall River. 
Everett Short, Rehoboth. 
Charles F. Kimball, Hanson. 
Edward D. Sprague, Hingham. 
F. J. Kustenmacher, Sharon. 
Fred R. Stone, Sudbury. 
William H. Tyzzer, Jr., Wakefield. 
C. E. Blood, Chelmsford. 
Leon S. Gifford, Georgetown. 
Caplis McCormack, Manchester. 
John F. Mulcahy, Mendon. 
William E. Howarth, Westborough. 



James W. Maley, Wachusett Moun- 
tain. 

Mark W. Shattuck, Watatic Moun- 
tain. 

Fred A. Lincoln, Warwick. 
Harland Burrows, Pelham. 
Mary E. Haley, Brimfield. 
Thomas Magovern, Charlton. 
N. C. Woodward, Shelburne Falls. 
H. H. Fitzroy, Savoy. 
David M. Smith, Waltham. 
Frank Wilson, Chester. 
John E. Curtin, Tolland. 
Frederick K. Shears, Mount Everett. 
Robert Miller, Lenox. 
Harry George, Williamstown. 
Alton B. Ellis, Acushnet. 
Alva Sikes, West Brookfield. 
Eugene Sullivan, Agawam. 
William H. St. John, Harvard. 



State Plantations. 

Four new lots embracing 80 acres were reforested during the 
spring, and planting work was completed on eight other lots. 
In all, 260,000 transplants were set out during the months of 
April and May. Conditions last spring were conducive to 
fire damage, and a few of our lots were partially burned over as 
a result of the spread of fire from surrounding areas. Prac- 
tically all of the damaged lots were restocked during the fall. 

Liberation cuttings were made on sixteen lots, and on several 
lots ribes were eliminated. We have noted no serious damage 
from blister rust as yet on trees within our plantations. Never- 
theless, the various white pine plantations will be scouted from 
time to time and precautions taken to keep them free from 
this disease. We advise all prospective planters of white pine 
to eliminate all currant and gooseberry bushes within the 



30 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



borders of the area to be planted, and also, if possible, for a 
distance of 200 yards surrounding the lot. The following 
table is a summary of work done during the past year: — 



Lot. 


Location. 


Number 
of Trees 
planted. 


Number 
of Acres 
| brushed. 


Ribes 
eliminated. 


Morton .... 


Freetown .... 


15,000 


- 


- 


Bazeley .... 


Uxbridge .... 


40,000 


- 


- 


Rockwood 


Ashburnham .... 


30,000 


- 


- 


Harrington 


Ashburnham .... 


13,000 


100 


- 


Robertson 


Barre 


40,000 


- 


- 


Ballou .... 


Shirley 


13,000 


- 


- 


Parker .... 


Lancaster .... 


30,000 


- 


- 


Spencer .... 


Oakham 


40,000 


44 


- 


Merrill .... 


Brookfield . . . 


5,225 


6 


- 


Fullam .... 


Brookfield .... 


7,775 


10 


- 


Tripp .... 


Heath 


14,000 






Andrews 


Lanesborough 


12,000 




- 


Fenno .... 


Ashburnham .... 


- 


39 


- 


Coughlin .... 


Ashburnham .... 


- 


80 


1,744 


Houston Brook 


Ashburnham .... 


- 


14 


- 


Shapleigh 


Ashburnham .... 


- ft* V 


25 




Johnson .... 


Ashburnham .... 


— 


66 


- 


Lawrence 


Ash by 






1.234 


Burnett .... 


Hopkinton .... 




100 




Clark .... 


Paxton 




22 




Stone . ... 


East Brookfield 




24 




Webster (2) 


Warwick .... 




58 




Hurd-Baker 


Rutland 




10 




Schley . • . 


Rockport .... 


1,000 






Chestnut Hill . 


Oakham 




4 




Larkin .... 


Oakham 




7 




Totals 


| 


261,000 


609 


2,978 





Nurseries. 

In our last annual report we stated that in the spring of 1922 
our nurseries contained 10,000,000 trees, including all age and 
size classes, and also that we expected to double this figure by 
1924. Due to an unprecedented germination we have been 
able practically to reach this figure in one year. The total 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



31 



number of trees in our nurseries according to our fall inven- 
tory is now almost 19,000,000. The result of our inability to 
obtain seed in desired quantities three and four years ago is 
now apparent, because the amount of our four and three year 
stock is still limited, and during the coming spring the number 
of trees which will be shipped from the nurseries will be the 
smallest in several years. 

The gradual accumulation of large areas of land for State 
forests has necessitated a radical change in nursery policy. 
Several of our reservations are situated in the western part of 
Massachusetts. During the early spring the roads leading to 
these tracts are in poor condition, and it has been difficult to 
haul heavy truckloads of trees to the planting site until late 
in the season. Valuable time has been lost. To remedy this 
condition we have established during the year five new trans- 
plant nurseries on the State forests and at points in the vicinity 
of plantable areas. The trees which are transplanted in these 
small areas are two-year seedlings which are obtained from 
either our Amherst or Barnstable nursery. Two-year trees are 
very small, and many thousand may be packed in the space 
which 1,000 four-year transplants will occupy. Moreover, 
nursery transplanting may successfully be done after the 
regular spring planting has been finished, and therefore the 
small seedlings may be hauled into the reservations in large 
numbers at the tag end of the planting season, when the roads 
are in decent condition. The seedlings, after being trans- 
planted in nursery rows, are weeded constantly, and are 
allowed to stay one or two years until large enough to plant 
on the adjacent forest land. This innovation permits of our 
giving more time to actual field planting because the stock is 
already at hand, and also we expect an actual saving in trans- 
portation to result from this system. Such nurseries have been 
established on Savoy, Otter River, Myles Standish, October 
Mountain and Swann State forests, and already contain 
1,632,000 trees. This figure will be more than doubled this 
spring. A new small model nursery has been established on 
the State road between Erving and Wendell. This nursery, 
although small, will be complete, and both seedlings and 
transplants will be produced. The product will be planted on 
the adjacent Erving Reservation. 



32 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 

The following is a list of shipments from our main nurseries 
last spring : — 

State forests 159,100 

Reforestation lots 261,000 

State institutions 63,600 

Town forests 34,000 

Sold for private planting 684,700 



Total 1,202,400 



Examinations. 

The examinations of private woodlands total 84, which is a 
few more than last year. 

The ice storm of November, 1921, brought about an increase 
in examinations of shade trees rather than woodland areas, but 
caused our clients to take more interest in both their shade 
trees and woodland than has been shown before. 

The passage of the new taxation law caused a number of 
inquiries as to the advisability of registering land according to 
the provisions of the act. 



Subject. 


Number of 
Examinations. 


Area (Acres). 


Fire damage 




1 


30 






12 


5,774 


Insects and disease 




16 


456 






16 


910 






17 


1,333 






2 


850 


Thinning and improvement cuttings 


16 


661 


Thinning and planting 




6 


239 


Totals . 




86 


10,453 



Forest Survey. 
During the past summer the work of obtaining complete 
data on the forest conditions of the entire State was continued. 
Norfolk and Essex counties were finished. The report for 
Norfolk County is off the press and ready for distribution. 
That of Essex County is ready for publication. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



33 



It is necessary for this Department to have a working plan 
of the State, showing a comparison between the forest areas 
and the agricultural lands, as well as the proportion of different 
age classes and types in the forest, before we are able to place 
an adequate forest policy for the State. We feel that these 
county surveys are necessary to furnish us with this information. 

We have already completed surveys for Worcester, Plym- 
outh, Hampshire, Norfolk and Essex counties. 

State Forests. 

Since the last annual report approximately 20,000 acres have 
been added to the area of our State forests, about 13,000 acres 
of this increase being divided among five new forests, while 
the balance represents additions to forests already in existence. 

By far the most important purchase was that of the October 
Mountain Forest, 11,500 acres, the largest continuous tract of 
land under one ownership in the State. These transactions 
are given in more detail in the first part of this report, and 
are only reviewed here to indicate that as the State forests 
increase in number, and as the older ones increase in size, 
the problem of protecting, developing and reforesting them 
grows apace. 

As in previous years, first importance has been given to the 
opening up and reconstruction of old, abandoned roads and the 
construction of new ones, in order that the forests may be 
made accessible for fire fighting, planting gangs, surveying 
crews, and those of the general public who may wish to make 
use of them for recreational purposes. 

The amount of land reforested was not nearly as large as we 
should like to report, owing to the fact that our nurseries have 
not kept pace with the demand for planting stock on the part 
of this Department and private owners. We trust that by 1924 
this handicap will have been overcome and we can have a 
planting program on State forests commensurate with the need. 

The ice storm of November, 1921, obstructed our develop- 
ment program by filling forests, and especially the wood roads, 
with broken branches and limbs. Many of these roads, which 
had been carefully cleared in previous years, had to be cleared 
all over again. 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



In spite of a very bad fire season during the spring, only two 
of the State forests were visited by fire and but one of these 
fires was of any consequence. On the Myles Standish Forest 
a fire burned 150 acres of worthless scrub oak, putting it into 
excellent shape for planting which was immediately done. 
Large signs were erected at conspicuous points on many of the 
forests. 

Saroy Mountain Forest. 
The ice storm of last November did a large amount of dam- 
age on this forest, filling the roads with fallen trees and debris, 
and it was necessary to clear up 14 miles of road that had 
previously been brush-cleared. The old abandoned town road 
through the center of the forest was put into passable shape by 
filling gullies and repairing culverts, and 7 miles of additional 
road were cleared of brush. The boundary lines were brushed 
for about 10 miles. There were 70,000 trees (spruces) planted 
during the spring at a cost of S4.S7 per thousand, and 286,000 
two-year-old spruce seedlings were transplanted into the nursery. 

Wendell Forest. 

Brush was cleared and burned on 5 miles of abandoned 
town roads and a mile of road rebuilt to make it passable for 
horses. In this work it was necessary to rebuild one bridge. 
A small but thrifty pine grove on this forest was thinned out. 

Erring Forest. 

A nursery was established on the State road containing 
150,000 transplants, and 11,000 five-year spruce transplants 
were planted at a cost of $12.75 per thousand. The fire line 
along the Laurel Lake road was widened farther and some 
slash on cut-over land cleared up. 

Mount. Grace Forest. 
A stone fireplace and shelter was built for the benefit of 
campers on the summit of the mountain, and the trail improved 
by putting a curb around the spring and building a shelter at 
the halfway point. The private road from the village to the 
entrance of the reservation was improved, State and town 



1923.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 35 

sharing in the expense; 35,000 feet of dead or dying chestnut 
was removed from the Morse lot and sawed into material for 
use on this and neighboring forests One hundred thousand 
pine were planted under contract at $20 per thousand, in- 
cluding stock. 

Otter River Forest. 
The spruce and tamarack swamp on the Bagley lot was 
thinned. Fourteen thousand pines were planted at a cost of 
S8 per thousand, and 136,000 seedlings transplanted into the 
nursery. More than 100 bags of sphagnum moss were shipped 
to the Amherst nursery. The headquarters house was shingled 
and painted, and brush cleared along 2 miles of road. 

Conic ay Forest. 

Debris from the ice storm was cleared from principal roads. 
Colrain Forest. 

Thirty thousand pines were planted under contract at a cost 
of $19 per thousand, including stock. 

Harold Parker Forest. 
The brush on both sides of Salem Street, a semi-abandoned 
town road passing through the heart of this forest, was cut 
back to a distance of 20 feet, and two wood roads in the east 
part of the forest have been cleared for a distance of 3 miles. 
A pine grove in the northeast part of the forest has been 
thinned by the removal of the oaks, and it will thus be less 
liable to injury from gypsy moths. 

Myles Standish Forest. 
Twelve miles of the fire line which was cleared and plowed 
last year was harrowed this year by the aid of the tractor, 
and 12 additional miles plowed and harrowed. A new road 
was opened from College Pond to the Federal cranberry bog 
some 4 miles in length, which creates a new entrance to the 
forest. Twenty-five miles of roads cleared in former years have 
been mowed over. The public camp ground on College Pond 



36 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



has been improved by the building of seats and a stone fire- 
place. A small brooder house for pheasants was built and 54 
birds raised to maturity. The area mentioned before as 
having been burned was planted with 166,000 pines, and 400,- 
000 seedlings were set in the nursery. 

Arthur Wario-n Sirann Forest. 

Roads in this forest were badly littered up by the ice storm, 
and it was necessary to clear 2 miles of wood roads and trails 
and to partially repair about a mile of public road. 

A new floor was laid in the lodge barn and small repairs 
made on other buildings. 

Fourteen thousand trees, including 4,000 black walnuts, were 
planted on this forest at a cost of S12 per thousand. A nur- 
sery was started with 300,000 seedlings. 

Beariown Forest. 
The abandoned South Lee road which runs through the 
heart of this forest was cleared of debris of the ice storm 
sufficiently to make it passable for horse and team. 

Tolland-Granville Forest. 
The ice storm raised havoc with the telephone line into the 
fire tower, and it was necessary to clear and rebuild about 3 
miles of it. 

About 1 mile of the town road leading from East Otis to the 
forest is scarcely passable in midsummer, and this was re- 
paired in the worst places by the use of corduroy and rock 
filling. Two miles of trail was cleared of ice-storm debris. 
The observer's camp was shingled. 

A bad fire which started in slash on neighboring land burned 
some 40 acres of State land, but most of the burned land was 
pasture and mowing. The cleared wood roads greatly assisted 
the fire fighters in stopping the flames. 

In the Granville district two abandoned houses and four 
barns were razed and ice-storm debris cleared from the princi- 
pal roads. A telephone was put into the headquarters house, 
which necessitated the construction of 2\ miles of private 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



37 



line. About 1 mile of wire fence was built on the south 
boundary. During the summer a crew of eight men was 
employed eradicating wild currants and gooseberries as a means 
of preventing the spread of pine blister rust. Not as many 
ribes plants were found as it was feared, but enough were 
present to spread a serious rust infection on the abundant pine 
reproduction. 

October Mountain Forest. 

Five miles of semi-abandoned town road were repaired by 
clearing ditches, rebuilding culverts and filling with cinders. 
In this work five bridges were practically rebuilt. In addi- 
tion, 12 miles of forest road were cleared of ice-storm debris 
and brush. The telephone line into the headquarters house 
being in poor shape, the private line in from Farnham Dam, 
4j miles, was rebuilt. 

Seventy-five acres of hay lands were mowed by our own men 
and standing grass sold on 50 acres. This is done as a matter 
of fire protection as well as to save the hay. 

The house occupied as a camp by surveying crew was put 
into habitable shape, and the Clark house repaired inside and 
out and made habitable for year-round occupancy. The Hu- 
ban place also received some attention. 

A nursery was started with 300,000 spruce seedlings. 

Shawme Forest. 

Thirty thousand Scotch pine and spruce transplants were 
set on this forest at a cost of $10 per thousand, and about 3 
miles of forest roads cleared. 



38 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Area of State Forests Nov. 30, 1922. 



Name. 


Location. 


Acreage. 


Arthur Warton Swann 


Monterey 


987 




Monterey, Great Barrington 


5,223 






796 






666 


Erving 


Erving, Warwick, Northfield 


2,044 


Harold Parker .... 


North Reading, Andover, North Andover . 


1,223 






141 


Mohawk Trail .... 


Florida, Hawley, Charlemont 


4,670 


Mount Grace .... 


Warwick 


1,066 


Myles Standish .... 


Carver, Plymouth 


7,757 


Oakham ..... 


Oakham, Rutland 


225 


October Mountain 


Washington, Lee, Lenox, Becket 


11,477 


Otter River .... 


Winchendon, Royalston, Templeton . 


1,761 






885 






240 






1,216 


Savoy Mountain .... 


Savoy, Florida 


5,427 


Tolland-Granville 


Tolland, Granville 


3,155 


Wendell 


Wendell, Montague 


2,955 


Unaasigned lots .... 




102 






52,016 





PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



-Total. 




$154,503 09 


Land. 


So g § ggggggEgggKg 


! 


Titles and 
Surveys. 




$16,077 58 


Development 
(Total). 




$40,577 17 


Miscellaneous. 


$1,176 42 
3,531 55 
26 59 
68 03 
232 27 
79 63 

404 39 

850 69 
4,167 43 

3,195 72 
156 50 


$13,889 22 


Roads and 
Fire Lines. 


SgSSSSgggE gg3 ggS 


S 

I 


Nursery. 


$372 26 
1,009 38 

1,094 49 
1,681 68 

1,185 44 
1,435 20 


$6,778 45 


f 


$109 00 
790 22 

337 05 
238 21 
72 25 
570 00 

127 53 
2,020 00 

334 66 
12 00 


$4,610 92 


Name. 














Otter River . 
Myles Standish 
Harold Parker 
Savoy Mountain . 
Swann . 
Beartown 
Colrain . 
Conway 

Leominster 
Mohawk Trail 
Mount Grace 
Oakham 

October Mountain 
Pittsfield 
Sandisfield . 
Shawme 

Tolland-Granville 
Wendell 
Unassigned . 


Totals . 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



REPORT OF THE STATE FIRE WARDEN. 
Mr. W. A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with your request, and in accord with 
the provisions of section 28, chapter 48 of the General Laws, I 
beg to submit the following report of the work accomplished by 
this branch of the Division this year. 

While a few fires had been reported during the last days of 
March and early April, it was not until about the 15th of April 
that serious fires began to occur. From this time until the 20th 
of May high winds prevailed and there was little or no rainfall. 
This unfortunate condition resulted in an unusually large number 
of fires, 1,045 occurring during the week of April 24 to 30, and 
875 during the following two weeks. The southern portion of 
the State suffered the most from these fires because it was in 
this section that there was a greater abundance of the dead 
limbs and other debris littering the forest floor as a result of 
the ice storm which occurred the year previous. Such condi- 
tions render it difficult, and in many instances impossible, for 
fire fighters to approach close enough to a fire to do effective 
work. An unusually large number of these fires were caused by 
persons who were burning under a permit obtained from the 
local warden, but who, because of high winds and other condi- 
tions, were unable to keep them under control having once set 
them. This prompted the Commissioner of Conservation to 
revoke all such permits, and he also sent out a general order to 
the forest wardens to discontinue the issuance of permits until 
such time as weather conditions should become more favorable 
for burning. Permits granted to citizens of the Commonwealth 
by forest wardens during the year aggregated approximately 
40,000. 

It is a pleasure to recognize the spirit of co-operation shown by 
Col. A. F. Foote, Commissioner of Public Safety, who placed at 
our disposal the State constabulary. This body of trained men 
rendered splendid service in aiding the State and municipal 
authorities in detecting and extinguishing fires. I wish, also, 
to here record my appreciation of the untiring effort of the dis- 
trict forest wardens who throughout this trying period were 
working constantly in co-operation with the town forest wardens, 
and many times were obliged to remain at fires day and night 
directing the work of extinguishment and seeing that no out- 
break occurred. 

Because of the conditions cited above, it is not surprising that 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



41 



we are compelled to record exceptionally severe losses. In addi- 
tion to the losses which are tabulated on another page of this 
report, there were 122 buildings destroyed and five human lives 
lost, which is conclusive evidence that serious building fires may 
result from forest fires unless reasonable measures of precaution 
are taken by clearing brush and other inflammable material for 
a distance of several hundred feet from summer camps and 
buildings adjacent to forest land. We have endeavored to be 
unusually active in apprehending and causing the prosecution 
of violators of the permit law, 85 offenders having been haled into 
court and convicted, while 94 others who were not brought into 
court were required to reimburse the town for the cost of extin- 
guishing fires which they had caused. 

On April 8 His Excellency, Governor Channing H. Cox, issued 
a Forest Protection Week Proclamation which read as follows : — 

The preservation and development of our forests will contribute to our 
industrial welfare and add to our individual comfort and enjoyment. 
It will be helpful in this direction if all our officers of public instruction 
and of civic and commercial organizations, in compliance with the request 
of President Harding, unite in thought and action for the protection 
of our splendid heritage by planning such educational and instructive 
exercises as shall bring before the people the disastrous effects of the 
present waste by forest fires. 

Much publicity work has been done in our efforts to arouse 
public opinion with respect to the forest fire evil; 10,000 caution 
signs or posters have been distributed throughout the State 
urging the greatest care on the part of those frequenting the 
woods. I am convinced that the large signs which we placed 
along highways where serious fires have occurred, with the 
four words " Carelessness Caused This Fire, " have served to 
remind the automobilist that cigarette butts or lighted matches 
should not be thrown by the roadside. 

The act passed by the last General Court requiring all opera- 
tors of portable sawmills and other persons engaged in lumbering 
operations of more than 10,000 feet to file a statement with this 
Department, giving the location and approximate area to be cut 
over and the location of portable sawmills, has been observed by 
the operators quite generally throughout the State. Usually 
failure to meet the requirements of this law is because the oper- 
ators have just entered business and are unfamiliar with the act. 

The damage caused to more than 40 miles of our telephone 
lines by the ice storm last year made it necessary for our men to 



42 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



devote much of their time to rebuilding them. For this reason 
we were obliged to defer certain contemplated construction work 
which we hope to undertake this year. 

The additional purchase of land in the northwestern part of 
the State made it necessary to create a new fire district known 
as District No. 7. which includes parts of Franklin, Berkshire 
and Hampshire counties. Mr. Verne J. Fitzroy of Savoy, who 
has been connected with the Department for several years as 
caretaker of the Savoy Reservation, was appointed district 
forest warden in charge of this new district. 

As in former years a series of forest fire conferences were 
held during the months of February and March at Boston, 
Greenfield, Middleborough, Pittsfield, Springfield and Worcester. 
These meetings were attended by forest wardens, selectmen from 
the smaller towns, members of the State constabulary, and 
representatives of the different railroads that operate in Massa- 
chusetts. In each instance the meetings were largely attended 
and proved to be extremely beneficial. The character of these 
meetings is indicated by the following program: — 



Program. 



Morning Session, 9.30 a.m. 

. M. C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden. 

Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner of Con- 
servation. 

. Harris A. Reynolds. Massachusetts Fores- 
try Association. 
E. A. Ryder. Boston k Maine Railroad. 
Wm. J. Barber. New York, New Haven & 

Hartford Railroad. 
Clayton Cone, Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Boy Scouts at Forest Fires Chief William Daly, Brockton, Mass. 



Chairman 

The Year's Work 

Town Forests 



Railroad Fire Problem 



Afternoon Session, 1 p.m. 
State Police Patrol . . Capt. George E. Parker, Department of 

Public Safety. 

Fire Fighting Equipment 
and Method of Using . John P. Crowe, District Forest Warden. 

Enforcement of Slash Law James E. Moloy, District Forest Warden. 

Forest Fire Laws, and In- 
structions . . . . M. C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden. 

Bird Life in [Massachusetts 

(moving pictures) . . O. C. Bourne, Division of Fisheries and 

Game. 

Discussion after each subject. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



43 



I regret to say that there has been no improvement in the 
railroad fire situation during the year. 

On December 29 a meeting was held at the State House, 
called by Commissioner Bazeley, at which were present repre- 
sentatives of the several railroads operating in Massachusetts, 
also Mr. Henry Seward of the Department of Public Utilities 
and Mr. Harris Reynolds of the Massachusetts Forestry Asso- 
ciation. At this meeting the subject discussed was proposed 
legislation relative to the daily inspection of the front-end screens 
and ash pans of locomotives. Because of the earnest assurance 
of the railroad officials that nothing would be left undone by 
them which would tend to reduce so-called "railroad fires," it 
was decided that legislation should not be asked for, at least for 
the present. 

Through the courtesy of Mr. F. W. Mitchell, supervisor of 
safety of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
Commissioner Bazeley and myself attended, during the month 
of March, meetings of the Boston, Midland, Old Colony and 
Providence divisions. These meetings were attended by the 
superintendents, foremen and many of the employees of the 
Division, and a general discussion of the railroad forest fire 
situation was gone into. 

Our records show that the number of fires caused by railroads 
has steadily increased during the past three years, and while it 
would appear from these records that the railroads had not 
co-operated to the fullest extent, the fact is they have exerted 
every effort possible to reduce their fire losses, with the result 
that railroad fires have increased over 75 per cent this year. 
This confirms statements I have made in previous reports that 
no material reduction will be made in the number of railroad 
fires until a more thorough and frequent inspection of fire- 
prevention devices is made and the railroads can be made to see 
the importance of eliminating the cause of such fires rather than 
continuing to pay the enormous fire-fighting and damage claims 
which amount to nearly $175,000 this year. 

Nearly 4,000 locomotives were inspected by members of the 
Department of Public Utilities and this Department, which 
resulted in the finding of many defective spark arresters and ash 
pans. The expense of making such inspections was borne by 
the State, which in my opinion is absolutely wrong, as I firmly 
believe such expense should be paid by the railroads. 

A large amount of forest fire fighting equipment, including 
several pieces of motorized apparatus, has been purchased by 
the various towns. 



44 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 

The co-operation between this Department and the Federal 
department has been very satisfactory, and we received S8, 549.62 
of the Week's law fund which was expended in fire protection 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. C. Hutchixs, 
State Fire Warden. 



Comparative Damages by Forest Fires for the Past Three Years. 



Yeab. 


Number 
of Fires. 


Acreage 
burned. 


Cost 
to extin- 
guish. 


Damage. 


Average 
Acreage 
per Fire. 


Average 
Damage 
per Fire. 


1920 


. . . . 


1.619 


14,517 


$27,839 


$62,241 


8.96 


$38.44 


1921 


. . . . 


2.849 


29.221 


34,065 


121.790 


10.25 


42.75 


1922 




4,099 


85,241 


101,714 


501.648 


20.79 


122.38 



Types of Classified Damages. 





1921. 


1922. 


Standing trees ** 


$50,554 


$285,754 




31,006 


79,935 


Buildings 


10,035 


63,308 


Bridges, fences 


1,050 


6,918 




29,145 


58,326 






7,407 


Totals 


$121,790 


$501,648 



Types of Land burned over (Acres). 



1921. 1922. 



Timber 


2,232 


7,828 


Second growth 


2,654 


16,508 


Second growth, not merchantable 


4,912 


20,214 




11,859 


29,163 




4,467 


11,528 


Not classified -1 


3.097 




Totals . . , ' $ - ^'^^^2^0 


29,221 


85,241 



1923.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 45 



Forest Fires of 1922. 



Months. 


Number. 


Acres.' 


Cost to 
extinguish. 


Damage. 


1921. 

December 


34 


60 


$161 00 


$144 00 


1922. 


28 


117 


189 00 


286 00 




8 


26 


40 00 


8 00 




617 


3,948 


5,300 00 


17,159 00 




1,630 


37,036 


42,003 00 


213,360 00 




1,407 


42,269 


50,954 00 


263,564 00 




43 


338 


368 00 


1,688 00 




12 


22 


128 00 


73 00 




20 


28 


122 00 


154 00 




12 


20 


134 00 


253 00 




148 


687 


1,308 00 


3,566 00 




140 


690 


1,007 00 


1,393 00 


Totals 


4,099 


85,241 


$101,714 00 


$501,648 00 



Classified Causes of Forest Fires, 1920-22. 





1920. 


1921. 


1922. 


Number. 


Per Cent. 


Number. 


Per Cent. 


Number. 


Per Cent. 


Railroad 


614 


37.9 


862 


30.25 


1,511 


36.86 


Lumbering .... 


4 


.2 


4 


.14 


4 


.09 


Brush burning .... 


155 


9.6 


327 


11.48 


545 


13.99 


Campers 


251 


15.5 


12 


.42 


30 


.07 


Incendiary .... 


13 


.8 


52 


1.83 


131 


3.19 


Miscellaneous .... 


50 


3.1 


537 


18.85 


952 


23.21 


Unknown 


532 


32.9 


1,055 


37.03 


926 


22.59 


Totals .... 


1,619 


100.0 


2,849 


100.00 


4,099 


100.00 





Railroad Fires of 1922. 



Railroad. 


Mileage. 


Number 
of Loco- 
motives. 


Number 
of 
Fires. 


Acreage 
burned. 


Damage. 


Cost to 

ex- 
tinguish. 


New York, New Haven & Hartford 


1,883 


922 


867 


10,421 


$69,666 


$13,589 


Boston & Albany .... 


979 


354 


458 


6,986 


43,304 


9,639 


Boston & Maine . . 


2,017 


1,025 


169 


4,103 


25,155 


3,136 


Central Vermont .... 


71 


23 


17 


568 


5,680 


826 


Totals 


4,950 


2,324 


1,511 


22,078 


$143,805 


$27,190 



46 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Gypsy Moth Work. 

The suppression of the gypsy moth continues to be one of the 
great economic problems which by law engages the attention of 
the Division of Forestry. Slow but sure has been the spread of 
this insect, so that to-day scattering infestations are found in 
nearly every city and town in Massachusetts. Its spread into 
the States west of Massachusetts seems inevitable. The alarm 
which is felt by the officials of other sections of the country was 
manifested by a conference recently held at Albany, New York, 
made up of representatives of the United States and Canadian 
Departments of Agriculture, the New England States, New 
York and New Jersey Departments of Agriculture, Conserva- 
tion, Forestry and Entomology, at which the question of how 
best to prevent the further spread of this insect was freely 
discussed, which finally resulted in the adoption of a resolution 
demanding that sufficient appropriation should be obtained by 
the States interested and the Federal government for the purpose 
of continuing and strengthening present control methods in the 
infested areas and the establishment of a control zone beyond 
which "they shall not pass." 

It is gratifying to report that notwithstanding the increase 
in the spread of the moth there is a marked improvement in 
many of the localities heretofore heavily infested. We mean by 
this that where in former years serious defoliation of shade and 
forest trees has occurred, this year, with the exception of a few 
instances, such as at Harwich and Falmouth, no serious damage 
was noted. 

The spread of the moth to the New York line, as noted above, 
made it necessary for the United States Department of Agri- 
culture to discontinue moth work in sixty-nine of the towns 
in which it had been operating and turn them over to State 
control, thus extending the field of State endeavor to the Berk- 
shire County line. 

Brown-tail Moth. 
The threatened outbreak of the brown-tail moth, referred to 
in the reports of 1920 and 1921, has happily failed to material- 
ize. The reason for this may be ascribed to the vigilance of the 
field men, who, acting under instructions of this office, have 
been extremely careful in their efforts to eradicate this damaging 
insect. However, careful work of inspection will be continued 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



47 



in the future, and with co-operation on the part of property 
owners in destroying the winter webs, it is reasonable to expect 
very little, if any, future damage from this insect. 

State Highway Trees. 
The shade trees on the State highways were carefully sprayed 
as usual under the direction of trained men of this Department; 
also gypsy moth egg clusters were creosoted wherever it was 
deemed necessary to prevent defoliation. 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts. 
The activities of the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, in its efforts to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth, 
have been continued during the past year, and a statement of 
accomplishment as contained in a brief report made by Mr. A. 
F. Burgess, who is the Federal officer in charge of the work, is 
as follows: — 

The field work of the Bureau of Entomology was greatly curtailed 
during the winter of 1922, but rough scouting was carried on in the Con- 
necticut Valley, where material assistance was furnished by the State and 
some of the towns concerned. 

By following this plan it was possible to do some intensive work in the 
western part of the State, and slight infestations were found in most of 
the towns examined. Further Federal funds were available in time for 
use during the spraying season, and several truck sprayers were used in 
the Connecticut Valley and in some of the worst infested areas in towns 
both east and west of this section. 

Weather conditions during June were very unfavorable for spraying 
work, and the results secured were less satisfactory than usual. 

Some scouting has been carried on in the Berkshire section of the 
State during the fall of 1922, but thus far only a few very small infesta- 
tions have been found. 

At present the State is covered by the quarantine regulations of the 
Federal Horticultural Board, and all products likely to carry the gypsy 
moth are inspected before they are shipped to territory not known to be 
infested. 

In the winter of 1922 two experts of the Bureau carried on work in 
foreign countries for the purpose of determining gypsy moth conditions 
and of securing natural enemies to assist in control work here. 

Dr. J. N. Summers spent the season in Japan, and although there were 
no serious outbreaks of the moth he was able to secure, as a result of very 
intensive work, a considerable amount of information that will be of 
practical use in the future. A study of the life history and habits of one 



4S 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



of the most valuable Japanese parasites of the moth was made, and he 
was able to collect and make a shipment of its cocoons to this country. 
Unfortunately the material arrived in poor condition on account of im- 
proper icing en route, and only a small number of the parasites were alive 
when they reached the gypsy moth laboratory at Melrose Highlands. 

These were given very careful attention, and it was possible to breed 
another generation and liberate a few test colonies in the field. The 
success of this introduction will be determined next year. 

Mr. S. S. Grossman, another expert of the Bureau, traveled extensively 
and made observations for conditions in France, Italy, Spain and Ger- 
many. The infestation was not serious in any of these countries during 
the past year. Most of the summer was spent in Germany, as it is 
• believed that it will be possible to secure more hardy natural enemies 
from northern rather \ 41 southern Europe. A few small outbreaks of 
the gypsy moth were found in Germany, but parasites were not sufficiently 
abundant to make possible large collections for shipment to the laboratory. 

It is proposed to continue this work with a view to determining the 
essential factors that influence the natural control of this insect abroad 
so as to utilize the information secured. 

Colonization and checking up the parasites that have already been 
liberated has proceeded throughout the year, and in some localities an 
abundance of some of these beneficial species has been found. 

During the winter of 1921-22 the temperature was very low in many 
localities, which resulted in large numbers of the eggs being killed. At 
hatching time there was a long period of continuous rain accompanied 
by low temperature which caused many of the young larvae to die before 
obtaining sufficient food. This resulted in a material decrease in numbers 
and a corresponding scarcity of defoliation in the part of the State that 
has been longest infested. The heavy rainfall during June resulted in 
rapid refoliation of trees that had been either wholly or partially stripped, 
so that the territory in Massachusetts suffered less than usual from this 
insect. These conditions did not occur in many sections of New Hamp- 
shire and in southwestern Maine, and heavy defoliation resulted. 

Valuable data are being secured in several towns in Massachusetts in 
co-operation with the Forestry Division, which it is hoped will lead to a 
reduction in the expense of handling moth work. 

The brown-tail moth was not seriously abundant, except in a limited 
number of localities, during the year, and it was possible to release a 
number of towns from quarantine. Thorough work on this insect should 
make possible a further decrease in the infested area. 

Special North Shore Work. 
Too much praise cannot be given to Col. Wm. D. Sohier to 
whose public spirit and foresight the public are indebted for the 
preservation of the beautiful North Shore woodlands. Several 
years ago these woods became so heavily infested with gypsy 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



49 



moths as to threaten their destruction. Then it was that 
through the influence of Col. Sohier a Special North Shore Fund 
was raised, the contributions to which were made first by the 
municipalities in wfiich the forests are situated; second, the 
Commonwealth; third, by the residents of the North Shore, 
and each year the work of protection has been prosecuted under 
the direction of this department. The work performed there 
during the past year includes the following: — the creosoting of 
egg clusters on the trees along twenty-nine miles of roadside, 
and what is termed rough creosoting work on 2,197 acres of 
woodland. Two hundred and eighty-five acres of protective belts 
were sprayed around serious colonies, and the trees along seven 
miles of State highway were sprayed. One hundred acres of the 
Bradley W. Palmer estate in Topsfield and Ipswich were sprayed, 
and 20 acres belonging to William B. Walker were also sprayed. 

Special North Shore Fund. 



Receipts. 

Balance Nov. 30, 1921 $8,132 01 

Private work 1,392 44 

Massachusetts Highway Division 204 15 

Appropriation for suppression of gypsy moths .... 1,375 98 



$11,104 58 

Expenditures. 

Pay roll . . . ... . . . $4,881 32 

Travel 95 61 

Telephone 60 25 

Rent 105 00 

Supplies 2,687 62 

Sundries 148 22 

7,978 02 



Balance Nov. 30, 1922 $3,126 56 



APPENDIX 



APPENDIX. 



Financial Statement. 
Receipts and Expendituees. 



Appropriation, salary of Commissioner . $5,000 00 
Appropriation, personal services . . 10,600 00 

$15,600 00 

Expenditures 15,271 60 $15,271 60 

Appropriation, expenses of Commissioner . . . 250 00 

Expenditures 126 21 126 21 

Appropriation, general forestry and nurseries . . . 11,000 00 

Expenditures 10,985 45 10,985 45 

Appropriation, purchase and planting of forest lands . 10,000 00 

Expenditures 8,626 20 8,626 20 

Appropriation, maintenance of forests .... 25,000 00 

Expenditures 24,991 64 24,991 64 

Appropriation, prevention of forest fires . $48,000 00 
Appropriation, Federal government . . 8,549 62 
Transfer 138 75 

56,688 37 

Expenditures 56,678 88 56,678 88 

Appropriation, protection against forest fires . . . 1,000 00 

Expenditures 1,001 98 1,001 98 

Appropriation, reimbursement for fighting forest fires . 1,000 00 

Expenditures . . . 521 72 521 72 

Appropriation, suppression of gypsy and 

brown-tail moths $165,000 00 

Balance from 1921 ..... 76,136 28 
Refunds and transfers ..... 651 89 

241,788 17 

Expenditures 153,787 28 153,787 28 

Appropriation, purchase and development 

of State forests $200,000 00 

Balance from 1921 71,878 90 

271,878 90 

Expenditures 168,539 06 168,539 06 

Appropriation, maintenance of Mount Grace . . . 1,000 00 

Expenditures 999 85 999 85 

Appropriation, maintenance of Standish Monument . 1,500 00 

Expenditures 1,494 08 1,494 08 

Appropriation, repairs of Standish Monument . . 1,000 00 

Expenditures 998 29 998 29 



Total expenditures for 1922 $449,475 71 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Receipts. 



For logs sold $21 58 

For trees sold 7,126 25 

For forest examinations 93 78 

For sale of land 1,723 45 

For damage by fire, etc 906 25 

For camp sites 144 00 

For sale of pamphlets 15 00 

For sale of hay, etc 335 00 

For sale of lumber (Swann operation) 200 00 

For supplies (gypsy moth work) 3,666 85 

For work done (gypsy moth work) . . . . . . . . 12,946 35 

For supplies for fire fighting 2,112 32 



Total for year $29,290 83 



Statement of Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests for 
the Year ending Nov. 30, 1922. 





Expenditures. 


State Forest. 


Planting 
Nursery. 


General 
Upkeep, 

Fire Lines 
and 

Roads, etc. 


Surveying, 
Title, etc. 


Land 


Total 


Receipts. 


Arthur Warton Swann . 


$1,919 89 


$796 05 


$372 27 




$3,088 21 


$345 00 


Beartown 


72 25 


205 89 


215 54 


$753 00 


1,246 68 




Colrain .... 


570 00 


203 00 


90 00 




863 00 




Conway 




39 00 


25 17 




64 17 




Erving 


1,312 97 


1,563 14 


1,957 04 


2,142 70 


6,975 85 




Harold Parker 




847 09 


346 77 




1,193 86 




Leominster . 






20 20 


706 08 


726 28 




Mohawk Trail 






2,197 13 


16,200 00 


18,397 13 


176 58 


Mount Grace 


2,020 00 


1,144 49 


225 30 


3,125 00 


6,514 79 




Myles Standish 


1,799 60 


7,912 94 


1,960 07 


1,220 00 


12,892 61 


134 00 


Oakham 




63 00 


50 46 


710 00 


823 46 




October Mountain 


1,435 20 


7,130 87 


5,611 54 


52,651 00 


66,828 61 


35 00 


Otter River . 


481 26 


2,436 90 




200 00 


3.118 16 


10 00 


Pittsfield 






92 35 


3,995 75 


4,088 10 




Sandisfield . 






445 80 


960 00 


1,405 80 




Shawme 


334 66 


3 00 


850 53 


1,418 06 


2,606 25 




Savoy .... 


1,431 54 


1,795 91 


526 07 


7,571 00 


11,324 52 




Tolland-Granville 


12 00 


3,764 77 


394 39 


850 00 


5,021 16 




Wendell 




2,281 75 


696 95 


4,145 75 


7,124 45 




Totals . 


$11,389 37 


$30,187 80 


$16,077 58 


$96,648 34 


$154,303 09 


$700 58 





1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



55 



The Distribution of Supplies. 

Supplies have been furnished to towns and cities for gypsy 
moth work as usual. The amounts given below do not corre- 
spond with the amount of aid given to the municipalities, as 
some towns make payment to the State for all or a part of the 
bill for supplies, according to the amount of their net expendi- 
ture and their class, under the provisions of section 4, chapter 
132 of the General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement and 
for expenditures, see table on page 57. 



List of Cities and Towns and Amounts of Supplies furnished for 

1922. 



Acton .... 


$906 50 


Harwich . 


$640 40 


Ashburnham . 


130 59 


Holbrook 


261 72 


Ashby .... 


381 60 


Holden 


368 84 


Ashland .... 


345 15 


Holland . 


16 71 


Avon .... 


121 40 


Holliston 


446 18 


Ayer .... 


4 50 


Hopkinton 


365 11 


Bedford .... 


770 46 


Hubbardston . 


2 61 


Berkley .... 


251 13 


Ipswich . 


14 95 


Berlin .... 


355 08 


Kingston 


256 94 


Bolton .... 


588 97 


Lakeville 


709 76 


Box borough 


449 24 


Lincoln 


. 1,315 13 


B oxford .... 


591 36 


Littleton 


818 49 


Boylston 


297 21 


Lunenburg 


. 1,157 03 


Brewster 


208 83 


Lynnfield 


438 55 


Bridgewater . 


. 1,093 29 


Marion . 


. 1,095 90 


Burlington 


536 84 


Marshfield 


. 1,631 75 


Carlisle .... 


467 33 


Mashpee 


489 47 


Carver . 


. 1,685 96 


Medfield 


572 21 


Chatham 


361 31 


Merrimac 


137 68 


Dennis .... 


411 73 


Middleborough 


. 1,730 80 


Dover .... 


. 1,373 25 


Middleton 


461 30 


Dracut .... 


885 64 


Newbury 


918 39 


Dunstable 


457 75 


Norfolk . 


286 13 


Duxbury 


733 90 


North Reading 


669 02 


East Bridgewater . 


956 60 


Northborough 


716 50 


Eastham 


215 43 


Norton . 


244 04 


Easton .... 


. 1,902 14 


Norwell . 


670 24 


Essex .... 


200 04 


Orleans . 


385 03 


Fox borough . 


931 09 


Pembroke 


. 1,415 52 


Freetown 


282 65 


Pepperell 


588 70 


Georgetown . 


723 83 


Plainville 


213 25 


Groton .... 


713 14 


Plympton 


372 38 


Groveland 


315 12 


Prescott . 


41 


Halifax .... 


526 74 


Princeton 


376 67 


Hanover .... 


858 71 


Raynham 


374 33 


Hanson .... 


429 57 


Rochester 


425 63 


Harvard .... 


934 92 


Rowley . 


667 44 



56 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



List of Cities and Towns and Amounts of Supplies furnished for 

1922 — Concluded. 



Salisbury- 


$764 56 


Tyngsborough 


. $1,539 42 


Sandwich 


871 94 


"Wareham 


3 37 


Sharon 


172 39 


W a viand 


503 22 


Sherborn 


628 88 


Wellfieet 


235 15 


Shirley . 


297 42 


"Wenhanf 


421 76 


Shrewsbury . 


124 33 


West Boylston 


213 80 


Southborough 


678 81 


West Bridgewater 


516 66 


Sterling . 


429 95 


West Newbury 


350 94 


Stow 


608 03 


Westborough . 


802 29 


Sturbridge 


5 30 


Westford 


. 1,326 68 


Sudbury . 


647 11 


Westminster . 


331 99 


Templeton 


23 20 


Weston . 


. 1,265 99 


Tewksbury 


948 07 


Wilmington . 


. 1,095 68 


Tisbury . 


442 30 


Winchendon . 


185 23 


Topsfield 


. 1,293 38 


Yarmouth 


435 35 


Townsend 


592 76 






Truro 


94 29 




$61,504 46 



Automobile supplies $859 01 

General forestry and nurseries 102 98 

Maintenance of forests 149 24 

Prevention of forest fires 31 85 

Purchase and development of State forests 365 61 

Purchase and planting of forest lands 19 99 

Traveling charges, etc 54 75 

Highway Division 503 70 



$2,087 13 



1923.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 57 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922. 





1922. 


1923. 


Cities axd 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
Quired 
Expend- 


Abington 


$1,714 24 












$1,775 73 


Acton 


980 39 




/ $44 08 
I 418 79 1 


s 

> $15 89 




$922 39 


991 67 


Acusb.net 


1,155 10 












1,269 91 


Adams . 


4,341 81 












4,395 33 


Agawam 


2,090 01 












2,405 67 


Alford . 














87 32 


Amesbury 


4,067 06 












4,186 33 


Amherst 


2,980 58 












2,992 98 


Andover 


4,391 45 












4,787 33 


Arlington 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Ashburnham . 


568 04 


771 74 


121 90 




130 59 


334 29 


593 90 


Ashby . 


348 81 


702 81 


227 08 1 


354 00 


381 60 


735 60 


376 03 


Ashfield . 














426 49 


Ashland . 


829 26 


1.591 93 


240 92 


762 66 


345 15 


1,107 81 


805 09 


Athol . 


3,652 50 












3,813 74 


Attleboro 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Auburn . 


1 ,057 92 


264 45 


139 45 








1,243 43 


Avon 


571 81 


568 32 


80 10 




121 40 


107 91 


605 2 8 


Ayer 


1,257 91 








4 50 




1,256 77 


Barnstable 


4,268 48 












4,414 44 


Barre 


1,305 93 












1,286 72 


Becket . 














330 34 


Bedford . 


923 62 


1,116 78 


/ 1,184 62 
1 1 35 58 1 


} 193 16 


770 46 


963 62 


1,025 29 


Belchertown . 


484 83 












485 44 


Bellingham . 


672 59 












723 46 


Belmont 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Berkley . 


293 65 


449 75 


55 00 


156 10 


251 13 


407 23 


291 97 


Berlin . 


357 16 


812 82 


/ 93 45 
I 84 80 1 


} 455 66 


355 08 


810 74 


360 76 


Bernardston . 


261 30 












261 49 


Beverly . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Billerica . 


2,802 52 












2,857 14 


Blackstone 


893 00 












917 10 



1 Lead sold. 



.3s 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 



1922. 1923. 



ClTIE* .WD 

Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Blandford 














$389 12 


Bolton 


$340 38 
5,000 00 


$449 01 


1 $17 50 

\ 348 25 ' 


$108 63 




$697 60 


380 47 
5,000 00 


Bourne 


2,259 54 












2,688 67 


Boxborough ■ . 


136 65 


391 39 




1 00 
291 61 1 




254 74 


449 24 


703 98 


139 36 


Boxford 


409 45 


795 84 




360 92 
16 351 




386 39 


591 36 


977 75 


412 38 


Boj'lston 


267 54 


341 89 




413 41 
14 20- 




74 35 


297 21 


371 56 


275 32 


Bra in tree 


4,819 95 




- 


- 






5,000 00 


Bre»vster 


447 52 


632 46 


523 44 
j 43 21 1 


} 184 94 


203 83 


388 77 


449 72 


Bridgewater . 


1,931 95 


2,158 43 


1 « con o/\ 

1 ,0-iO 80 
I 92951 


1 22648 


1,093 29 


1,319 77 


1.965 35 


Brim field 


386 97 




- 


- 






404 07 


Brockton 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Brookfield 


437 15 


224 57 


155 20 








443 62 


Brookline 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Buckland 














956 28 


Burlington 


583 77 


337 76 


/ 175 00 
1 132 10 1 


} - 


536 84 


290 83 


608 36 


Cambridge 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Canton 


2,754 58 












2,586 14 


Carlisle 


239 04 


1 ,439 24 


/ 229 32 
1 106 641 


J 1,200 20 


467 33 


1,667 53 


237 11 


Carver ... 


896 71 


1,301 21 


I 827 86 
\ 473 20 1 


j 404 50 


1,685 96 


2,090 46 


973 18 


Charlemont 














317 99 


Charlton 


651 34 


364 14 










657 50 


Chatham 


1,270 12 


1,238 03 


/ 216 50 
1 16301 


} : 


361 at- 


329 22 


1,337 98 


Chelmsford . 


2,624 22 












2,684 74 


Chelsea . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Cheshire 














388 68 


Chester . 


412 90 












412 03 


Chesterfield . 














173 32 


Chicopee 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Chilmark 


187 35 












187 90 


Clarksburg . 


228 97 












246 13 


Clinton . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 



i Lead sold. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



59 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 





1922. 


1923. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Privnte 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Cohasset 


52,717 14 












$2,786 12 


Colrain . 


550 55 












547 11 


Concord 


o fion fin 
2,9l>9 69 












3,012 99 


Conway . 














376 17 


Cummington 














161 83 


Dalton . 














2,132 02 


Dana 


256 44 


$178 11 


$32 33 








274 17 


Dan vers 


3,542 64 












3,739 39 


Dartmouth . 


3,247 84 












3,456 69 


Dedham 


o.UOO 00 












5,000 00 


Deerfield 


1,80s 2/ 












1,841 44 


Dennis . 


631 93 


807 97 


/ 451 71 
\ 63 57 1 


/ $176 04 


$411 73 


$587 77 


656 68 


Dighton 


1,260 45 












1,300 53 


Douglas . 


623 47 












623 24 


Dover . 


1,170 31 


1,143 62 


/ 489 85 
I 251 29 1 




1,373 25 


1,346 56 


1,188 66 


Dracut . 


1,334 72 


2,08o 65 


J 847 00 
1 68 001 


{ 

) 750 93 


885 64 


1,636 57 


1,356 10 


Dudley . 


i ooo on 

1,322 89 












1,353 18 


Dunstable 


172 46 


531 33 


/ 285 17 
\ 82 751 


s 

1 358 87 


457 75 


816 62 


180 56 


Duxbury 


1,741 14 


1,810 26 


f 795 86 
[ 13 131 


J 69 12 


733 90 


803 02 


1,786 31 


East Bridgewater . 


1,560 53 


1,633 86 


977 20 


73 33 


956 60 


1,029 93 


1,522 65 


East Brookfield 


328 54 












334 59 


East Longmeadow 


829 00 












870 96 


East ham 


245 50 


378 10 


120 00 


132 60 


215 43 


348 03 


280 57 


Easthampton 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Easton . 


1,875 29 


3,217 37 


/ 911 40 

1 5 25i 


J 1,342 08 


1,902 14 


3,244 22 


1,887 70 


Edgartown 


792 61 












810 57 


Egremont 














278 65 


Enfield . 


305 09 












298 04 


Erving . 


749 16 












743 07 


Essex 


539 51 


738 84 


900 25 


199 33 


200 04 


399 37 


564 34 


Everett . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Fairhaven 


3,414 99 












3,914 07 



i Lead sold. 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 



Cities axd 
Towns. 






1922. 






1923. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


I\c— 

im burse- 
men t . 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Fall River . 


$5,000 00 


- 






- 


- 


$5,000 00 


Falmouth 


4,588 71 


- 






- 


- 


4,603 67 


Fitchburg 


5.000 00 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Florida . 


- 


- 






- 


- 


529 41 


Foxborough . 


1,283 03 


$2,059 98 


$416 00 


$776 95 


$931 09 


$1,708 04 


1,349 27 


Framingham . 


5,000 00 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Franklin 


2,595 94 


- 






- 


- 


2,581 39 


Freetown 


582 35 


879 84 


176 50 


297 49 


282 65 


580 14 


584 00 


Gardner 


5,000 00 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Gay Head . 


- 


- 






- 


- 


30 51 


Georgetown . 


612 41 


1,206 S6 


I 847 97 
V 59 97 1 


| 594 45 


723 83 


1,318 28 


635 02 


Gill 


297 29 


- 






- 


- 


281 85 


Gloucester 


5.000 00 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Goshen . 


- 


- 






- 


- 


128 27 


Gosnold . 


- 


- 






- 


- 


425 57 


Grafton . 


1,963 95 


979 40 






- 


- 


1,934 84 


Granby . 


352 42 


- 






- 


- 


368 64 


Granville 


25127 


- 






- 


- 


239 49 


Great Barrington . 


3,410 72 


- 






- 


- 


3,372 55 


Greenfield 


5,000 00 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Greenwich 


230 64 


- 






- 


- 


226 70 


Groton . 


1,318 83 


1,700 70 


1 226 57 
1 230 73 1 


} 381 87 


713 14 


1,095 01 


1.320 29 


Groveland 


658 21 


1,034 07 


467 33 
V 118 80 1 


J 375 86 


315 12 


690 98 


668 45 


Hadley . 


1,172 93 












1,142 84 


Halifax . 


376 71 


685 80 


' 583 25 
\ 61881 


} 309 09 


526 74 


835 83 


397 15 


Hamilton 


1,764 04 












1,787 25 


Hampden 


197 92 












196 50 


Hancock 














167 29 


Hanover 


968 39 


1,362 38 


J 1,138 55 
i 101441 


} 356 39 


858 71 


1,215 10 


964 43 


Hanson . 


848 29 


1,224 16 


517 51 


376 03 


429 57 


805 60 


743 23 


Hard wick 


1,342 62 


214 67 


401 17 








1,329 53 


Harvard 


824 35 


926 09 


1 226 42 
\ 308 091 


J 101 74 


934 92 


1,036 66 


82185 



i Lead sold. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



61 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 





1922. 


1923. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Harwich 


$949 56 


$1,603 39 


$1,121 52 

\ 16 771 


> $000 50 


$640 40 


$1,294 23 


$1,027 06 


Hatfield . 














1,065 33 


Haverhill 


C AAA AA 

5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Hawley . 














108 33 


Heath . 


10ft 00 
1^0 \>6 












124 74 


Hingham 


o coo oo 
3,683 66 












3,780 62 


Hinsdale 














333 62 


Holbrook 


946 24 


962 91 


468 25 


16 67 


261 72 


278 39 


1,003 85 


Holden . 


1,032 84 


947 62 


/ 556 75 
\ 75 341 


\ 

J " 


368 84 


ooo co 
2o6 02 


1,044 95 


Holland . 


67 45 


100 52 


33 54 


33 07 


16 71 


49 78 


73 00 


Holliston 


1,061 34 


1,298 95 


/ 625 26 
1 39 241 


| 237 61 


446 18 


683 79 


1,086 16 


Holyoke 


c aaa An 

5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Hopedale 


1 OOO CA 

1 ,68b 59 












1,389 14 


Hopkinton 


844 78 


556 54 


/ 134 35 

\ 32 251 


J ~ 


365 11 


76 87 


855 39 


Hubbardston 


419 73 


541 72 


35 48 


121 99 


2 61 


124 60 


413 94 


Hudson . 


2,417 41 












2,471 86 


Hull 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Huntington . 


415 15 












409 59 


Ipswich . 


2,521 93 








14 95 




2,876 32 


Kingston 


789 74 


1,113 52 


486 38 


323 78 


256 94 


580 72 


828 91 


Lakeville 


529 98 


1,057 60 


f 252 65 
\ 71111 


| 527 62 


709 76 


1,237 38 


522 27 


Lancaster 


1,077 32 












1,092 34 


Lanesborough 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


371 82 


Lawrence 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Lee 














1 544 72 


Leicester 


1,153 67 


462 40 


269 45 








1,184 64 


Lenox 


2,860 62 












2,834 19 


Leominster 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Leveret t 


179 56 












180 33 


Lexington 


4,105 52 












4,352 68 


Leyden . 


113 44 












114 21 


Lincoln . 


877 06 


2,348 75 


802 50 




1,315 13 


1,315 13 


878 43 



i Lead sold. 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. [Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 





1922. 


1923. 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 

\ 1 I I ' 1 U 1 1 I 

received 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Littleton 


$674 68 


$340 22 


f $40 25 
\ 443 36 1 


I - 
/ 


$818 49 


$484 03 


$685 20 


Longmeadow . 


2,272 77 












2.335 47 


Lowell . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Ludlow . 


3,526 77 












3.510 31 


Lunenburg 


739 40 


584 45 


f 684 50 
I 250 69 1 




1,157 03 


1,002 08 


743 02 


Lynn 


5,000 00 












5.000 00 


Lynn field 


824 03 


1.518 27 


498 75 


$694 24 


438 55 


1,132 79 


862 81 


Maiden . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Manchester . 


4,723 39 












4,745 87 


Mansfield 


2,533 52 












2,547 51 


Marblehead . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Marion . 


1,365 86 


1,365 87 


594 98 




1 ,095 90 


1,095 90 


1,390 86 


Marlborough . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Marshfield . 


1,350 71 


1 ,350 92 


I 1,948 29 
1 186 70 1 


/ 


1,631 75 


1,631 75 


1,375 71 


Mashpee 


213 44 


1,702 56 


372 91 


1,489 12 


489 47 


1,978 59 


229 83 


Mattapoisett . 


847 62 












879 11 


Maynard 


2,114 80 












2,157 89 


Medfield 


890 47 


1,292 76 


/ 699 09 

l 17 951 


\ 402 29 

J 


572 21 


974 50 


890 79 


Medford 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Medway 


996 76 












1,000 87 


Melrose . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Mendon . 


361 20 












365 48 


Merrimac 


713 44 


1,213 54 


/ 350 61 
\ 34 921 


J 500 10 


137 68 


637 78 


735 45 


Methuen 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Middle borough 


2,791 62 


3,012 30 


/ 1,932 98 
i 112 971 


1, 


1,730 80 


1,561 18 


O Oft7 07 


Middlefield . 














113 73 


Middleton 


461 41 


613 89 


/ 443 36 
1 52 651 


J 152 48 


461 30 


613 78 


479 75 


Milford . 


4,880 93 












4,921 19 


Millbury 


1,795 86 












1,857 01 


Millis . 


834 11 












848 38 


Millville . 


539 29 












546 37 


Milton . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 





i Lead sold. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



63 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 





1922. 


1923. 


PlTTTC A \*n 
Kyi I 1 H/O A -> U 

Towns. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Monroe . 














$194 97 


Monson . 


$834 50 












831 13 


Montague 


3,767 16 












3,799 66 


Monterey 














206 84 


Montgomery . 














78 27 


Mount Washington 














69 06 


Nahant . 


1,724 62 












1,735 84 


Nantucket 


2,366 95 












2,852 66 


Natick . 


3,968 45 












4,016 60 


Need ham 


4,565 42 












4,742 59 


New Ash ford 














36 55 


New Bedford 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


New Braintree 


211 66 


$48 00 


$158 40 








210 50 


New Marlborough . 














532 62 


New Salem 


212 84 












231 75 


Newbury 


719 13 


1,888 26 


i 952 41 
I 367 70 1 


J $1,169 13 


$918 39 


$2,087 52 


749 65 


Newburyport 


4,887 77 












5,000 00 


Newton . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Norfolk . 


542 03 


860 09 


f 247 25 
\ 4 50 1 


} 318 06 


286 13 


604 19 


557 75 


North Adams 














5,000 00 


North Andover 


3,145 36 












3,086 00 


North Attleborough 


3,541 25 












3,565 05 


North Brookfield . 


887 54 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


915 68 


North Reading 


635 73 


1,166 48 


824 20 


530 75 


669 02 


1,199 77 


664 06 


Northampton 


5,000 00 












k nnn nn 


Northborough 


833 05 


399 56 


/ 376 06 
1 379 771 




716 50 


283 01 


835 09 


Northbridge . 


2,580 23 












2,672 88 


Northfield 


701 42 












716 51 


Norton . 


874 49 


1,067 31 


273 33 


192 82 


244 04 


436 86 


883 23 


Norwell . 


572 35 


1,416 54 


/ 1,356 55 
\ 36 981 


J 844 19 


670 24 


1,534 43 


584 06 


Norwood 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Oak Bluffs . 


1,148 78 












1,298 62 



i Lead sold. 



64 DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Tow 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 





1922. 


— ! 

1923 


Cities and 
Towns. 


Re- 
Quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 

Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
' quired 
Expend- 
' iture. 


Oakham 


$177 40 


$489 46 


$678 80 


$312 06 


- 


$312 06 


$183 °0 


Orange 


2,097 87 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


O n7fl -t 
*.U<8 < I 


Orleans . . • 


661 10 


1,160 19 


f 536 72 
\ 39 00 


J 499 09 


$385 03 


884 12 


0»» 40 


Otis 


- 


- 




- 


- 


_ 


169 50 


Oxford . 


983 59 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


999 13 


Palmer . 


4,186 32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


4.371 09 


Paxton . 


194 55 


86 30 


296 43 


- 


- 


_ 


206 34 


Peabody 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


5,000 00 


Pelham . 


220 49 


- 


- 


- 


- 




220 53 


Pembroke 


617 66 


1.426 43 


/ 1.159 29 
1 37 61' 


| 753 77 


1.415 52 


2.174 29 


642 11 


Pepperell 


1,222 05 


1,763 04 


l 415 10 
\ 175 50 1 


) 511 29 


588 70 


1,099 99 


1,186 47 


Peru 


- 


- 






- 


- 


120 00 


Petersham 


555 29 


249 03 


99 47 


- 


- 


_ 


576 33 


Phillipston 


149 91 


229 05 


63 40 


79 14 


_ 


79 14 


149 53 


Pittefield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


5,000 00 


Plainfield 


- 


- 




_ 


- 


_ 


116 29 


Plainville 


51108 


862 89 


165 90 


351 81 


213 25 


565 06 


489 69 


Plymouth 


5,000 00 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Plympton 


235 25 


730 12 


186 75 


494 87 


372 38 


867 25 


241 12 


Prescott . 


11680 


_ 


_ 


_ 


41 




117 69 


Princeton 


476 47 


1,492 48 


/ 125 21 
\ 60 45 1 


! 1.016 01 

i 


376 67 


1,392 68 


533 40 


Provincetown 


1,551 52 


_ 






_ 


_ 


1,532 37 


Quincy . 


5,000 00 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 




5,000 00 


Randolph 


1,241 24 








- 




1,278 18 


Raynham 


EE- in 


00/ UO 


490 05 




374 33 


373 98 


582 95 


Reading 


3,805 54 












3,944 08 


Rehoboth 


698 95 












690 46 


Revere . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Richmond 














247 22 


Rochester 


444 03 


743 86 


273 10 


299 83 


425 63 


725 46 


440 47 


Rockland 


2,648 43 












2,685 13 


Rockport 


1.868 23 












1,904 51 


Rowe 


114 18 


140 64 


16 00 


26 46 




26 46 


108 42 



1 Lead sold. 



923.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 65 



ABLE SHOWING EXPENDITURES AND REIMBURSEMENTS OF TOWNS AND 

Cities for the Year 1922 — Continued. 



Cities and 
Towns. 


1922. 


1923. 


Re- 
Expend- 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Pri vcitc 
Work. 


Re- 
imburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


;owley . 


$451 83 


$1,115 56 


/ $436 16 

\ 293 70 1 


j $663 72 


$667 44 


$1,331 16 


$4oo 00 


;oyalston 


412 92 


- 




- 


- 


- 


415 88 


ussell . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,060 To 


'utland 


440 67 


418 42 


259 88 


- 


- 


- 


422 19 


alem 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


alisbury 


995 13 


994 72 


/ 848 25 
\ 73 28 1 


} - 


764 56 


764 15 


1,031 89 


indisfield 


- 


- 






- 


- 


223 47 


andwich 


662 36 


1,549 88 


f 184 30 
\ 137 86 1 


} 887 52 


871 94 


1,759 46 


681 98 


augus . 


3,548 00 


- 




- 


- 


- 


o,oo4 67 


avoy . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


97 69 


cituate . 


3,039 26 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Q 01ft 10 

o,zio iy 


oekonk 


1,042 02 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,314 92 


haron . 


1,588 16 


- 


- 


- 


172 39 


- 


1,606 54 


heffield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


466 61 


helburne 


937 24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


nfi/4 i Q 
904 16 


herborn 


716 92 


1,224 69 


/ 1,492 83 
I 108 54 1 


} 507 77 


628 88 


1,136 65 


ill 00 


-hirley . 


792 76 


830 69 


222 45 


37 93 


297 42 


335 35 


too 97 


hrewsbury . 


1,953 40 


1,439 62 


/ 553 60 
\ 42 41 1 


} - 


124 33 


-. 


O 1 1 O f*Q 

1, III VI 


hutesbury . 


149 21 


69 47 


55 48 




- 


- 


156 01 


omerset 


1,201 16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,197 13 


; omerville 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


south Hadley 


2,167 97 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1) Oil 70 

1,611 to 


Southampton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


319 10 


■^outhborough 


1,117 95 


880 51 


631 41 


- 


678 81 


441 37 


1,172 95 


■iouthbridge . 


4,538 16 












4,595 52 


Southwick 


464 04 












476 56 


spencer . 


1,568 06 












1,587 32 


Springfield 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Sterling . 


602 35 


604 67 


/ 120 20 
\ 252 79 1 


} 2 32 


429 95 


432 27 


612 73 


Stockbridge . 


2,316 45 












2,267 34 


Stoneham 


3,100 15 












3,289 26 


-•toughton 


2,377 63 












2,544 05 


Stow 


637 08 


652 65 


/ 401 93 
\ 330 14 


} 15 57 


608 03 


623 60 


638 85 



1 Lead sold. 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION. 



[Jan. 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns .\xd 
Cities for tee Year 1922 — Continued. 



Cities and 
Tow>fs. 


1922. 


1923. 


Re- 


Total 








1 Total 
Amount 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Extw-d- 








Tools 

■■iiiliinl 


! received 

from 
1 State. 










St ur bridge 


$4y> 45 


$647 40 


$155 80 


$157 95 


$5 30 


$652 70 


$492 50 


Sudbury 


632 16 


m 45 


1 34138 
1 322 36' 


\ - 
J 


647 11 


633 40 


678 35 


Sunderland 


365 43 


_ 








_ 


380 52 


Sutton . 


715 09 


_ 








_ 


733 68 


Swampscott . 


5,000 00 


_ 


- 






_ 


5,000 00 


Swansea . . 


851 21 


_ 


_ 






_ 


922 64 


Taunton 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


5.000 00 


Templeton 


1.087 34 


494 96 


_ 




23 20 


_ 


1.056 41 


Tewksbury . 


1.172 96 


2.552 35 


573 94 


1,379 39 


948 07 


2.327 46 


1.209 84 


Tisbury . 


1.013 93 


S.M IS 


52 50 




442 30 


316 55 


1.029 79 


Tolland . 


- 


- 








_ 


134 29 


Topsfield 


1.000 34 


1.590 83 


202 83 


528 63 


1,293 38 ! 


1.397 01 


1.023 74 


Townsend 


838 64 


5.54 A 


/ 247 35 
\ 134 76 1 


} 4630 


592 76 


639 06 


830 61 


Truro ... 


256 23 


514 95 


105 25 


258 72 


94 29 


353 01 


253 55 


Tynzsborough 


m n 


2,465 77 


1.333 63 


2.070 81 


1.539 42 


3,610 23 


414 25 




_ 


_ 


_ 






_ 


154 03 


Upton . 


582 29 


_ 


_ 






_ 


580 82 


Uxbridge 


2.618 16 




- 






- 


2,530 05 


Wakefield . 


5.000 00 


_ 


_ 






_ 


5.000 00 


Wales . 


144 18 


_ 


_ 






- 


147 30 


Walpole . 


3.416 67 


_ 


_ 


- 




- 


3.630 55 


Waltham 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 






_ 


5.000 00 


Ware 


2,698 07 


_ 


_ 








2.915 47 


Ware ham 


3,357 26 


- 


- 




3 37 


- 


3,425 84 


Warren . 


1,614 71 


398 51 


185 49 








1.687 61 


Warwick 


206 78 












197 37 


Washington . 














55 52 


Watertown 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Wayland 


1,640 05 


1,076 46 


1 72020 
1 128 00» 




503 22 




1,654 01 


Webster . 


3,788 13 












3,955 26 


Welksley 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Wellfleet 


372 77 


683 47 


1 230 85 
1 3 47» 


\ 310 70 


235 15 


545 85 


375 36 


Wendell . 


295 38 i 












290 50 



1 Lead sold. 



J Includes sprayer. 



1923.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 73. 



67 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1922 — Concluded. 



Cities and 
Towns. 


1922. 


1923. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Total 
Net 
Expend- 
iture. 


Private 
Work. 


Ke- 
im bur se- 
men t. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Re- 
quired 
Expend- 
iture. 


Wenham 




ii nio 85 


$749 94 




$421 76 


$344 97 


$1,115 00 


West Boylston 


524 12 


662 64 


289 60 


$138 52 


213 80 


352 32 


606 62 


West Bridgewater . 


877 56 


1,845 51 


/ 579 27 
\ 55 02 « 


| 967 95 


516 66 


1,484 61 


902 10 


West Brookfield . 


454 94 


138 20 


154 21 






447 70 


West Newbury 


437 40 


825 14 


/ 621 80 
1 190 50» 


| 387 84 


350 94 


738 78 


446 70 


West Springfield . 


5 non nn 












5,000 00 


West Stockbridge . 














380 31 


West Tisbury 


250 21 












252 42 


Westborough . 


1,516 63 


787 37 


/ 663 85 
1 13 861 


\ 
J 


802 29 


73 03 


1,561 96 


Westfield 














5,000 00 


Westford 


1,234 46 


1 150 83 


/ 350 00 
I 400 00 1 


\ _ 
J 


1 "?2fi fi8 


1 243 05 


1,287 67 


Westhampton 


131 53 












128 21 


Westminster . 


468 42 


655 69 


272 00 


187 27 


331 99 


519 26 


483 23 


Weston . 


2,328 94 


3,020 41 


131 40 




1,265 99 


1 265 99 


2,415 90 


Westport 


1 , CrxU oo 












1,871 41 


Westwood 


1 131 68 












1,157 89 


Weymouth 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Whately . 














366 41 


Whitman 


2 545 15 












2,574 45 


Wilbraham 


859 13 












928 87 


Williamsburg . 














503 08 


Williamstown 














2,175 61 


Wilmington . 


1,007 97 


2,517 75 


956 00 


1,509 78 


1,095 68 


2,605 46 


1,045 35 


Winchendon . 


2,020 58 


2,040 01 


210 98 




185 23 


185 23 


2,042 03 


Winchester 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Windsor . 














152 95 


Winthrop 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Woburn . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Worcester 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Worthington . 














184 87 


Wrentham 


819 98 












846 39 


Yarmouth 


871 80 


1,138 12 


170 16 


266 32 


435 35 


701 67 ! 


902 43 



1 Lead sold. 



Public Document 



No. 73 



C6e Commontoealtft of cgjaggacfmsetts 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF CONSERVATION 

AND 

STATE FORESTER 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1923 



fi'l'AAsi,. \ Department of Conservation* 




Publication op this Document approved bt the Commission- ox Administration and Financb 

K 



291924 



STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 

Conservation of Forests 3 

Conservation of Wild Life 3 

Conservation of Domestic Animals 4 

Forest Fires 5 

State Forests (New land) 5 

Standish Monument 6 

White Pine Blister Rust 6 

Lectures and Conventions 7 

Recommendations, Forestry 7 

Recommendations, Fisheries and Game 8 

Recommendations, Animal Industry 9 

Division of Forestry 10 

New Legislation 10 

Organization • 11 

State Plantations 11 

Forest Survey 11 

Examinations 12 

Nurseries * 12 

State Forests 12 

Report of Fire Warden 16 

Report of Moth Superintendent 19 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work, 20 

Appendix, Financial Statements 21 



OUTLINE OF REPORT. 

This report is dhidfd for convenience rnd economy into four parts: — 

Part I. The orgKniztitioa au<l genera) work of the Department of Conservation. 

Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 

Part III. The work of the Division .of Fisheries & Game. 

Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II arn print e-d in one volume as P,ubUe Document No .^73. 
Part III is printed in a separate vo*umo as Pubji-. i/ocument No. 25. 
Part IV is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 98. 



Cbe Commontoealti) of Massachusetts 

Part I. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CONSERVATION. 

The conservation of natural resources has become an accepted policy and a 
clearly perceived matter of state and national welfare. Especially is this true 
with respect to the wise use of the forests. So far as Massachusetts is concerned, 
to the educational work of this department, supplemented by the untiring efforts 
of many public-spirited citizens and associations, conspicuous among the latter 
being the Massachusetts Forestry Association and the Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce, is due much of the credit for this aroused public opinion. 

Following the policy adopted when the department was first organized, and 
in accordance with the spirit of the act creating it, the Commissioner and the 
Directors of divisions (in their advisory capacity) have met at frequent intervals 
for the purpose of discussing departmental affairs. Fifteen meetings have been 
held and a complete record of the business transacted at these meetings has been 
kept. 

Conservation of Our Forests. 

President Coolidge, in his first message to Congress, said: " Reforestation has 
an importance far above the attention it usually secures." And Governor Cox 
during the early part of the year, urging upon the towns the wisdom of establish- 
ing town forests, said in part : " Massachusetts should do its share in restoring the 
forest to our idle lands and it seems that in this way the importance of the subject 
can best be brought before the citizens of the Commonwealth." 

Further evidence that the vital importance of a constructive forest policy is 
clearly recognized is given by the action of the United States Senate in ap- 
pointing a committee to make a careful stud}' of the forestry situation throughout 
the country and to report its recommendations to Congress. This committee 
held a hearing at the State House in Boston, September 22, which was attended 
by the State Foresters of all the New England states, also, representatives of 
many of the leading wood-using industries of New England. The members of 
this committee seemed deeply impressed by the statements of the several speakers 
with respect to conditions in New England, both as to the imperative need of 
reforestation and the necessity of adequate fire protection. 

As a result of the searching investigation of this committee, its Chairman, 
Senator McNary of Oregon on December loth introduced a bill into Congress, 
Senate No. 1182, embodying the recommendations of the committee. The out- 
standing features contemplated by this bill may be summarized as follows : — It 
provides for cooperation between the Federal Government and the various states 
in forest fire protection with a special reference to watersheds; the devising of 
forest tax laws designed to encourage timber growing on the part of private land 
owners; for the promoting of practical methods of insuring the standing timber 
on forests from losses by fire; the cooperation of the Federal Government with 
the various states in the distribution of tree seeds, and plants to be used in the 
development of forests upon wild and waste lands. An appropriation is provided 
to be used in cooperation with the states in advising and assisting land owners in 
the management of farm w r oodlots. The bill also provides for the enlargement of 
national forests wherever such increase will tend to protect navigable streams or 
any waters suitable for irrigation purposes. If this bill is enacted into law and 
the policy contemplated by it strictly adhered to, it cannot fail to make a very 
substantial increase in timber production. 

Conservation of Wild Life. 

The dependence of wild life on a suitable environment has been fully shown in 
the changes which have taken place in this Commonwealth since the days of the 
early settlers. It has been argued rather facetiously that agriculture kills no game, 



4 I 73 

but the doctrine cannot make headway in this State. One has only to refer tc 
the large areas of water and land formerly suitable to wild fowl which today exisl 
largely in the shape of cranberry bogs, or to the large stretches of land which have 
been brought to such a high degree of cultivation that under the mantle of a 
winter s snow offer not the slightest refuge or feeding ground, or to areas sc 
denuded of trees as to remove the natural habitat of other forms of wild life 
These conditions are likely to become more unfavorable before there is a swine 
in the opposite direction. 

It is an elementary principle in the work of conservation that the best result* 
can be obtained only when complete control over given areas may be exercised 
— to the end that the land may be protected against poachers, vermin systemati- 
cally destroyed, and conditions made favorable to support the largest possible 
population of desirable forms of wild life. Taking the State as a whole, there is 
such absence of necessary central control as to cause one to marvel that so much 
wild life is to be found today in the face of adverse conditions. Few owners of 
land give any thought to the welfare of wild life as part of the plan of develop- 
ment. All other material interests are first served. Should it develop that such 
activities are not injurious to wild life — all well and good, otherwise the species 
remaining take up the fight for existence against greater odds. The people are 
beginning to realize more and more the dependence of wild life on proper environ- 
ment and the importance of forests in supplying it. While forests for lumber and 
tuel may be the slogan of the hour, thousands of people are beginning to chant the ; 
additional words "and for the protection of wild life." It is to the everlasting 
credit of the inhabitants of the State that through the acquisition of additional 
lands each year there is an increasing guarantee of more favorable conditions for 
at least a portion of our birds, quadrupeds and fish. The time has come when the 
principle should be extended to the acquisition of some lands which are more 
valuable as wild life sanctuaries than some areas acquired primarily for reforest- 
ation purposes — but upon which a certain amount of reforestation can annually 
be carried on. The perpetuation of the wild life of the State will never be assured 
until a reasonable number of such permanent sanctuaries are established generallv 
throughout the public domain. 

The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game was conducted without any 
special innovations, along lines laid down in previous vears. Special attention has 
been directed toward the increase of output of bird farms and fish hatcheries 
at a less cost of production. The success of anv State activity depends very 
largely on the volume of workable public sentiment behind it. it is safe to say 
that there never was a time in the history of the State when the people who do not 
hunt but are interested in the outdoors, the sportsmen, fishermen and landowners 
were as united to bring about permanent benefits as they are today. 

Conservation of Domestic Animals. 
The relation of our domestic animals to public health, to production of food 
and raiment, to agriculture, and to many lines of commercial industry, imposes 
the necessity of applying all the principles of conservation to the maintenance of 
this relation at a standard which its importance calls for in the whole scheme of 
public welfare. 

When we consider that certain of our domestic animals furnish a large portion 
of our food supply by their products during fife and by the utilization of their 
carcasses when slaughtered, that they are the original factors in the production of 
raiment for the people, that successful agriculture is not possible without them, 
that many lines of business are dependent upon their use as toilers on the farm 
or servants in transportation, and that modern day progress in scientific protection 
of the public health is being rapidly accomplished by their use in the laboratory, 
it can readily be seen that the function of the Division of Animal Industry, in 
the control and eradication of contagious diseases of these animals and super- 
vision of the sanitary conditions under which they are maintained, if efficiently 
executed, is one of true conservation of valuable resources. 

This Division is now doing extensive work in the eradication of bovine tuber- 
culosis by the use of the tuberculin test. This work is of great value not only 



in the improvement of health conditions of live stock, but also in lowering the 
incidence of human tuberculosis due to bovine origin. This branch of the 
Division's service has developed very rapidly since the passage of the so-called 
tuberculin testing law, and it is receiving the strong support not only of the cattle 
owner who has a laudable desire to eliminate disease from his animals, but also of 
public health officials who see a great step forward toward protection of the health 
of the people by further purification of the milk supply. 

Certain additional legislation seems necessary in order that this service may 
function to the limit of its possibilities in conservation of human and animal life. 
The prompt slaughter of clinical cases of bovine tuberculosis should be aided by 
enactment of legislation which should induce their being reported to officials 
of the Division. This can only be brought about by a compensation law providing 
reimbursement to their owners. 

The sale of animals shown by the tuberculin test to be diseased for any other 
purpose than slaughter should be prohibited, which would in a large measure 
prevent the spread of the disease from farm to farm. The regulatory measures 
recently put in force at the Brighton stockyards, the only public cattle market 
in this State or in New England, under which measures no tuberculous cattle 
can be sold whether their origin be Massachusetts farms or those in other States, 
should be looked upon as a potent factor in the control and eradication of the 
disease, and any effort directed against these measures by commercial interests 
should be promptly opposed for the public good. 

We refer to the accompanying report of the Director of Animal Industry for 
recommendations for legislation and for a detailed description of the service of 
this Division. 

Forest Fires. 

Coincidental with the development and wise use of the forest must be its pro- 
tection from fire. While the annual loss from forest fires in Massachusetts has 
been greatly reduced from what it was in former years, the problem is still one of 
serious moment. It is difficult to put into accurate figures the loss sustained 
from forest fires. Such estimates usually include the value only of the wood and 
timber destroyed, no account being made of the injury to the soil, which in many 
instances is of such nature as to retard for many years the young growth. 

Our fire protective system has been developed with three basic principles in 
mind; first, the use of every reasonable measure of precaution to prevent fires 
and as carefully compiled records show that 95% of those that have occurred in 
Massachusetts during the past fifteen years were caused by carelessness, we are 
continually attempting through publicity methods to arouse public opinion to a 
complete realization of the necessity of using care to prevent fire. The second 
problem involves the prompt detection of them when in their incipient stage which 
is very effectually accomplished by the operation of our system of observation 
towers, and the third and vitally important need is an organized force of experienced 
men properly equipped to be on the ground at the earliest possible moment after 
the fire has started to extinguish it. With our district forest wardens, the town 
forest wardens and their deputies, we now have a very effective organization. 

State Forests. 

The purchase of land for state forests has progressed during the year to the 
extent of acquiring 11,577 acres. This land is distributed as follows: 

Harold Parker State Forest, 105 acres 
Savoy Mountain State Forest, 382.3 acres 
Beartown State Forest, 1,228.6 acres 
Colrain State Forest, 330.89 acres 
Conway State Forest, 475.18 acres 
Erving State Forest, 1,448.3 acres 
Leominster State Forest, 384.25 acres 
Mohawk Trail State Forest, 356.5 acres 
Oakham State Forest, 88 acres 
October Mountain State Forest, 634.3 acres 



6 P.D. 73. 

Sandisfield State Forest, 1,079.5 acres 
Shawme State Forest, 122 acres 
Tolland-Granville State Forest, 222 acres 
Wendell State Forest, 549 acres 

New State Forests 
Hawle}' State Forest, 850 acres 
Otis State Forest, 885 acres 
Worthington State Forest, 225 acres 
Unassigned Lots, 2,211.8 acres 

) Additional land for state forests now in process or contemplated for acquisition 
comprises approximately 22,000 acres. 

Standish Monument Reservation. 

The damage to the statue of Capt. Myles Standish caused by the electrical 
storm of August 26, 1922 has not yet been repaired because of insufficient funds. 
It is hoped that the General Court during its next session will provide the money 
necessary to restore the monument to its original form. 

The interest and sentiment felt for this historic reservation is attested by the 
fact that during the season beginning May 29, 1923 to October 28, over 50,000 
people visited the reservation. According to the register made by Wilfred C. 
Dawes, in immediate charge of the grounds, there were visitors from every state 
of the Union, also from Alaska, Philippine Islands, Honolulu, Cuba, Porto Rico, 
Bahamas, Bermuda, every Province of Canada, Mexico, Tokio, Japan, Pekin 
and Hong Kong, China, Sydney, Australia, Soi, East, Africa, several places in 
Russia, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Ireland, England, Paris, France, 
Germany and Newfoundland. 

White Pine Blister Rust. 

The work of controlling the spread of the disease is in the hands of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, except where it is done on our state forest lands. A forestry 
report would hardly seem complete unless it contained some account of the state- 
wide work of blister rust control. For this reason we have asked Mr. C. C. Perry, 
Agent in charge of blister rust work, to submit a brief summary of the year's 
activities, which follows : 

"The following is a summary of white pine blister rust control work in Massa- 
chusetts as conducted by the Division of Plant Pest Control, Massachusetts 
Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Office of Blister Rust Control, 
Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Educational work has been conducted by the federal blister rust agents in all 
districts except Berkshire, although intensive work has been confined to six dis- 
tricts, namely, Essex, Plymouth, Worcester (South), Worcester (North), Franklin, 
and Hampden. The educational work has consisted primarily of personal inter- 
view work with pine owners and others, supplemented by the holding of special 
meetings with talks on blister rust, placing of special exhibits in local stores and 
at the regular agricultural fairs, conducting demonstrations to individuals and 
groups, and the publication of blister rust items in local news publications. 

No special effort has been made to locate new areas of infection although in 
conducting the regular field work infected pines have been found in 18 additional 
towns. This brings the number of towns in which pine infection has been found 
to a total of 142. A particularly striking infection area was found in Ashburnham, 
another in Spencer, both in Worcester County. Several new areas were found in 
Plymouth Countj^, also in Hampden. Infection in southern Berkshire County 
is very general. 

Control work was started for the season on April 16 and discontinued in most 
sections on September 15, a small amount of work however, continuing until 
October 15. This work has been conducted upon the same general lines as last 
year except that in some districts (Worcester South and Essex) where last year 
the state assumed the entire responsibility of securing the areas, this year an 
attempt has been made to have the owner assist in the preliminary work as well 
as with the actual eradication of ribes. This plan has been quite successful and 



P.D. 73. 7 
will be attempted on an even broader scale another season. In sections where 
ribes are very scarce the entire expense of scouting has been borne by the state. 
Control work was performed in each of the nine districts in the state including 
Berkshire County, although no educational work was conducted in that county." 
The following gives a summary of the w r ork. 

Number of Men employed. 

The State employed 1 Checker of field work, 24 Inspectors (full time), 5 In- 
spectors (temporary), 17 Laborers (part time only). 

The number of wild ribes pulled was 1,558,107 and the number of cultivated 
ribes pulled was 14,977, making a total of 1,573,084. 

The total expenditures by co-operators amounted to $6,894.90 and the total 
expenditures by state (all w r ork) amounted to $16,050.53, making a total cost of 
$22,945.43. The average cost per acre was llc\ 

Lectures and Conventions. 

There has been no abatement in the requests for lectures dealing with the sub- 
ject of forestry and related topics. It is pleasing to note that the majority of 
these requests are received from business organizations, such as Boards of Trade, 
Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs, which fact indicates a lively interest on the part of 
the every-day business man in the activities of this department. 

During the year the Commissioner and his assistants gave eighty-three lectures. 
In addition to the above, the Commissioner attended the following conventions : — 

Association of State Foresters, Harrisburg, Pa. 

American Fish & Game Association, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Massachusetts' Tree Wardens and Foresters' Association, Boston, Mass. 

New England Section of American Foresters, Greenville, Me. 

During the summer the Commissioner visited England, and acting under au- 
thority given him by His Excellency, Governor Cox, devoted several weeks' time 
to the study of forestry conditions and the methods practiced by that Govern- 
ment in promoting the forestry interests of that country. The attention and 
information generously given him by the British Forestry Commission was ex- 
tremely valuable and deeply appreciated. 

Recommendations of the Department of Conservation. 

Division of Forestry. 

1. Prevention of Forest Fires. While the operation of the forest fire prevention 
system has been productive of gratifying results, the Commissioner is convinced 
that the laws under winch it was created can be so amended as to make it far 
more effective in the future. When it is considered that the department has 
already acquired in the name of the Commonwealth approximately 65,000 acres 
of land for forestry purposes, and will continue to acquire land for that purpose 
for several years to come, it becomes apparent how essential it is to afford the 
greatest amount of fire protection possible. 

Under existing statutes in towns, forest wardens are appointed by the select- 
men and in cities by the mayor and aldermen. These wardens have sole charge 
of the prevention and extinguishment of fires wrhich occur within their respective 
towns. Inasmuch as the State Forester is charged in a general way with the 
control of forest fires throughout the state, it seems logical that he should be given 
more power with respect to the creation of a fire-fighting organization. 

It is, therefore, recommended that the appointment of these forest wardens be 
given to the State Forester. 

The Commissioner is also of the opinion that the cost of extinguishing fires 
should be divided between the State and the County in which the fire occurs. 
Past experience has shown that while many towns consider the cost of fighting 
forest fires a serious burden, some towns even find it practically prohibitive. 
Obviously, the forested areas of the state are found in the towns with the smallest 
valuation and in such towns there is a reluctance to expend an adequate amount 
of money in fighting forest fire. 



8 P.D. 73. 

As forests are a distinct advantage to a county and are enjoyed by all its people, 
it seems only just that the entire County should share in the necessary cost of 
protecting them. 

Under existing statutes railroads are required to pay the cost of extinguishing 
fires set by l^hem on grass lands or forest lands, and the Commissioner believes 
that the same liability should be imposed upon any person or corporation operating 
lines for the transmission of electricity or engaged in the construction or repairs 
of highways. 

2. Salaries of Directors. Owing to the steady growth in the volume of business 
in both the Division of Fisheries and Game and Animal Industry, it is the opinion 
of the Commissioner that the Directors of those divisions are not receiving salaries 
commensurate with their duties and responsibilities. The Commissioner, there- 
fore, recommends an increase of salary in each instance. 

Division of Fisheries and Game. 

1. Relative to Hunting a7id Fishing Licenses. The law should require a fishing 
license in all inland waters (in which Nantucket and all ponds now fished com- 
mercially under lease from the Director are excepted). Under existing law, a 
license is not required to fish in inland waters winch have not been stocked since 
January 1, 1910. It has been a physical impossibility to stock all of the inland 
waters in order to do away with this distinction. It, in effect, means that the 
waters most recently stocked are given protection, and that the waters which 
have not been stocked recently (and winch presumably need it most) are left 
without any protection. This bill will also repeal Section 15 of Chapter 131 of the 
General Laws which calls for a publication of the list of stocked waters. By re- 
pealing this section we will be saved the expense of publishing this list annually, 
to say nothing of eliminating the work connected with it. We believe the senti- 
ment in the State is — that all fishermen should pay their share of the freight. 
This bill will also repeal Section 11 of Chapter 131 of the General Laws. This 
section provides for the issuance of duplicate licenses to replace lost licenses. In 
order to simplify bookkeeping, and to make license holders more cautious, the 
repeal of this section would require the licensee to purchase a new license. At 
present the loser of a license must make an affidavit as to the loss, sending it to the 
State House before obtaining a new license. 

2. Relative to the Date of Expiration of Lobster Licenses and to the Revocation 
of Such Licences. At present the lobster licenses expire on November thirtieth. 
All other licenses issued by this Division expire on December thirty-first and 
it is desirable to have all licenses expire on the same date to make the office records 
uniform. This bill also provides for the revocation of a license in the event of 
certain violations, with the effect of putting the violator out of business for a year 
from the date of conviction. As the law now stands, no license can be revoked 
unless the holder has been twice convicted of certain specific violations. If he is 
convicted of fishing without a license there is nothing to prevent him from ob- 
taining a license and resuming his wwk. The change provides for the revocation 
of his license upon conviction of a violation of any of the lobster laws, except that, 
in the matter of having short lobsters, conviction shall not result in such revocation 
unless — per cent of the lobsters shall consist of short lobsters. It also provides 
that upon conviction for fishing without a license, — no license can be obtained 
within a year from the date of conviction. We believe that every lobster fisher- 
man who honestly desires to maintain and build up his means of livelihood will 
see the reasonableness of these safeguards. 

3. Relative to Da?naging Property while Hunting, Trapping or Fishing. The 
great majority of hunters, trappers and fishermen want to obey the law and treat 
the other man's property with the same consideration which they would show to 
such property were it their own. A small class of bad actors is constantly stirring 
up ill-feeling between landowners and the public. We want to help to hold tins 
class in subjection. Nothing (outside of a jail sentence) will be as effective as the 
revocation of the hunting or fishing license which would result from a conviction 
under this proposed law. 

4. Relative to Fishing in Inland Waters. The law T should reduce the number of 
traps in winter fishing from ten to five to each fisherman. This is the only further 



P.D. 73. 9 
legislative restriction on winter fishing we propose. We are still of the opinion 
that the present open season of winter fishing is too long and too deadly. But we 
have decided to watch the results of recently imposed restrictions to see if the 
benefits are sufficient before advocating more than the above. 

5. Investigation by a Special Commission relative to Public Hunting and Fishing 
Grounds and Game Refuges. It is desirable to create a commission of five members 
to consider the establishment of a public shooting ground. Likewise a public 
fishing ground to be located on the banks of some river or stream and to report 
to the Legislature of 1925 its recommendations thereon. There is a great amount 
of waste land only partly suitable for reforestation which could be utilized for 
this purpose with no loss to agriculture. The same is true of fishing grounds. 
But such a commission could study the project in all its phases and report on what 
should be done, if anything, to establish such public properties in this State. - 

Division of Animal Industry. 

1. Payment for Cattle condemned and killed because affected with Tuberculosis. 
A condition which now threatens to offset in a large measure the progress being 
made in the eradication of bovine tuberculosis under the provisions of Chapter 353 
of the Acts of 1922, approved May 2, 1922, and known as the tuberculin-testing 
law, is the operation of section 4 of that Act, which provides that on and after 
August 1, 1923, section 12 of Chapter 129, as amended by section 2 of Chapter 
353, should be repealed. 

Said section 12 of Chapter 129, General Laws, is the statute under which, until 
its repeal (Aug. 1, 1923), the Commonwealth paid for cattle condemned and killed 
because affected with tuberculosis, and the operation of which resulted in the 
slaughter of many badly diseased animals so far advanced in the stages of tuber- 
culosis as to be readily recognized by their owners and by local inspectors. They 
then became subjects for immediate quarantine, which was followed by their 
condemnation and killing under orders of the Director of Animal Industry. 

An owner of such an animal would always report its condition to his local town 
inspector or direct to the Division of Animal Industry, knowing that official con- 
demnation and killing meant the payment of a certain amount of money as a 
partial reimbursement for his loss. As soon, however, as State indemnity was 
withdrawn by the repeal of this section of law, the attitude of the owners of this 
class of animals immediately changed. They now, in many instances, fail to 
report them, as nothing is to be received from the State as reimbursement, and 
the disagreeable publicity of quarantine is avoided. 

What now happens in such instances is that a badly diseased tuberculous cow 
is kept milking as long as possible, and in the meantime she is rapidly spreading 
the disease to other cattle, not to mention the possibility of its spread to the human 
subject. The final disposal of such an animal is death from the disease, slaughter 
by the owner, or sale at whatever price she will bring in the market. In the latter 
case there is the extension of a center of infection to another location, other cattle 
are exposed, and possibly other human fives jeopardized. 

Before the law referred to was repealed these animals, as stated, were reported, 
then quarantined, killed and paid for; further, — members of the same herd were 
examined for additional cases, and the premises were cleaned and disinfected. 
These measures undoubtedly limited to a large degree the spread and prevalence 
of the disease, were measures of sound economy, and immeasurably effective in 
protection of the public health. 

Upon repeal of the law providing for reimbursement for this class of cases, we 
found their number reported to official authority immediately dropping 75 per 
cent. This means that a large per cent of the badly diseased tuberculous cows 
in the state are continuing to five and spread the infection. In my opinion it 
would be far better for the Commonwealth to pay something for these creatures, 
and have them condemned and killed. This would be of itself a measure of true 
economy and would certainly be greatly in aid of the present movement to eradi- 
cate tuberculosis by use of the tuberculin test. 

The Commonwealth is now spending large amounts of money to eradicate the 
disease by scientific methods, and to allow active spreaders of the disease to exist 



10 P.D. 73. 

because of no practicable law by which to exterminate them would seem to be a 
paradoxical condition which should be remedied. 

I therefore recommend the enactment of legislation whereby the present con- 
dition, brought about by the repeal of section 12, Chapter 129, General Laws, may 
be eliminated. 

A bill embodying the above recommendation is herewith submitted. 

2. Restricting the Sale of Cattle which hare reacted to a Tuberculin Test. A con- 
dition operating directly against the eradication of bovine tuberculosis by use of 
the tuberculin test, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 353, Acts of 
1922, is the indiscriminate sale of animals which have reacted to such test. 

Chapter 137 of the Acts of 1922 places certain restrictions on the sale of this 
class of animals, but does not absolutely prohibit it. Consequently there is more 
or less traffic in them, resulting in spread of the disease from one farm to another. 

In my opinion the owner of an animal which has reacted to a tuberculin test 
should not be allowed to sell the same except for purposes of immediate slaughter. 
If he desires to retain such an animal in his own herd he alone should assume the 
responsibility, be the consequences what they may, but the public should be pro- 
tected against the consequences of this traffic in diseased animals. 

It is my opinion that the expenditure of money by the Commonwealth to eradi- 
cate bovine tuberculosis is rendered more or less futile if the disease is allowed to 
be carried from one farm to another by the sale of animals known to be affected 
therewith. 

I therefore recommend that said Chapter 137, Acts of 1922, recorded as Section 
33 A of Chapter 129 of the General Laws, be so amended as to prohibit the sale 
of reacting cattle except for immediate slaughter. 

A bill embodying this recommendation is submitted herewith. 



Part II. 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY. 

Affecting as it does the well-being of our citizens and the whole industrial life of 
the Commonwealth, the work of this division in promoting the forestry interests 
of the Commonwealth has constantly become more popular and its activities 
steadily on the increase. The activities of this department include the giving of 
technical advice in regard to the proper management of forest lands to private 
owners, the development of nurseries, the planting of state-owned lands, operating 
a fire prevention system and the suppression of the gypsy moth, the accomplish- 
ments in each being more fully described else where in this report. 

New Legislation. 

For several years under existing statutes the Commonwealth has been extending 
financial aid to certain towns in defraying the cost of fighting forest fires. The aid 
so rendered, however, was not sufficient in the case of towns with small valuations 
to induce their best efforts. Therefore, to further encourage fire fighting in such 
towns, legislation was enacted based upon the recommendation of the Commis- 
sioner increasing the aid so given. 

The several laws under which land for state forests is acquired were so amended 
as to make them alike in matters of detail without making any substantive 
changes. 

For the purpose of more effectually securing the preservation of a locality of 
scenic beauty, an act was passed authorizing the Commissioner of Conservation 
to accept on behalf of the Commonwealth a gift of land of five acres situated in 
the town of New Marlborough. On this small reservation is a beautiful waterfall, 
one of the most picturesque in New England, known as Campbells Falls. The 
State of Connecticut has also been given land located in that state which joins 
the above tract. It will be preserved as a reservation for the benefit of all the 
people. The expense incident to its maintenance will be borne by the State of 
Connecticut. 



P.D. 73. 11 

Organization*. 

William A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner and State Forester 
Charles 0. Bailey, Secretary 
Harold 0. Cook, Chief Forester 

D. C. A. Galarneau, Ass't Forester in Western Massachusetts 
Frank L. Haynes, Ass't Forester, Land Purchase 
James Morris, Ass't Forester, Nurseries 

Robert B. Parmenter, Ass't Forester, Mapping and Reforestation 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden 
George A. Smith, Moth Superintendent 

District Forest Wardens. District Moth Superintendents. . 

1. James E. Molov, Woburn 1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverlv 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River 2. William A. Hatch, Marlborough 

3. Jos. J. Shepherd, Pembroke 3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill 

4. John P. Crowe, Westborough 4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Foxborough 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield 5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay 

6. Jos. L. Peabody, Winchendon 6. Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester 

7. Verne J. Fitzroy, Savoy 

State Plantations. 

One new lot of 35 acres was planted in addition to completing two others and 
filling in another which had been burned. In all, 75,000 transplants were set out 
during the months of April and May. Conditions following the planting were so 
dry that the plantations were not as successful as in former years. These lots 
will be restocked as soon as possible. 

Liberation cuttings were made on two lots, and eradication of ribes carried on on 
several others. It has been brought to our attention that several of our planta- 
tions are infected by blister rust, but with eradication work done effectively, we 
can hope to keep this disease out. We especially urge all prospective planters of 
white pine to eliminate all currant and gooseberry bushes within the borders of 
the area to be planted, and also, if possible, for a distance of 200 yards surrounding 
the lot. The following is a list of the lots worked on during the past year, giving 
the name of the lot, location, and work done. 

Morton 1 , Freetown — 13,000 trees planted. 

Pierce, Myricks, 33,000 trees planted. 

Chestnut Hill, Spencer — 10,676 Ribes eliminated. 

Lawrence, Fitchburg — Liberation cutting (27 acres). 

Smith, Ashburnham — Brush disposal (10 acres), 98,474 Ribes eliminated. 

Dean, Oakham — 10,000 trees planted. 

Schoonmaker, Ashburnham — 33,000 trees planted, Brush disposal (80 acres). 

Glebe, Hopkinton — Brush disposal (108 acres). 

Lawrence, No. Ashburnham — Brush disposal (63 acres). 

Coughlin, No. Ashburnham — Brush disposal (54 acres). 

Fenno, Westminster — Brush disposal (36 acres) and (80 acres). 

Lynde, Westminster — Brush disposal (39 acres). 

The total number of trees planted was 89,000, of liberation cutting — 27 acres, 
of brush disposal — 470 acres, and 109,150 Ribes eliminated. 

Forest Survey. 

The work of completing an extensive forest type survey of the entire state was 
further carried on during the past summer. The southern part of Berkshire 
County was covered, and next year, it is our intention to finish the northern part 
of this county. This work is done during vacation season by students from forestry 
schools. 

By the use of these type plans and data gathered from first-hand knowledgejof 
the conditions existing throughout our forest areas, this department is better 
able to handle the forestry problem of Massachusetts. 



Examinations. 





P.D. 73. 


Xumber 


Acres 


1 9 


1 HAH 


14 


230 


9 


4,825 


8 


1,122 


11 


919 


54 


8,156 



12 

Subject 
Thinning .... 
Insects and disease . 
Planting .... 
Thinning and planting 
Estimating and operating 

Totals 

The examinations of privately owned woodlands as well as shade trees number 54. 

The public is becoming thoroughly alive to the value and beauty of trees. Con- 
sequently, the examinations dealing with thinnings and insects and disease are 
increasing. The public is also taking great interest in the beautifying of home 
grounds, whether they are large or small so that examinations dealing with the 
ornamental side of forestry are inclined to exceed those dealing with the com- 
mercial. 

Nurseries. 

Although nursery production has been increased, the demand for planting stock 
from private planters, state institutions, and towns operating town forests still 
exceeds the output. The demand for stock for private reforestation work is par- 
ticularly strong. Last spring we were able to supply everyone who applied for 
stock, but only by cutting our own program. Aiiother factor which permitted 
us to supply all appli cants was the difficulty experienced by some who had ordered 
stock early, to secure help for planting. This condition resulted in cancellations of 
orders amounting to over 100,000 trees. 

At the present time we have in our three main nurseries and six reservation 
nurseries approximately 20,000,000 trees. We still have too few of some species 
and too many of others, but adjustments are constantly being made. About 
7,000,000 of our total stock are transplants. There is more white pine seed ob- 
tainable now than for several years past, but it is still almost impossible to secure 
red pine seed in large quantities. 

The following table shows the distribution of stock shipped from our three main 
nurseries during the spring of 1923. 

Sold " '1,123,575 

Reforestation lots 69,000 

State Forests 70,600 

State Institutions 135,950 

Town Forests 101,300 



1,500,425 

Reference is made to the above in another section of this report. 

In addition, there were shipped from the main nurseries about 2,000,000 
seedlings which are transplanted in the reservation nurseries, and which are in- 
tended for exclusive use on state reservation planting. 

The only new feature is the construction of another small display nursery on 
the Mokawk Trail. Ground has already been broken and the grading has been 
practically finished. This nursery will be complete as to detail but will contain 
only about 75,000 transplants. It is intended mainly as an educational project 
and for this purpose the site is ideal, but there are several sizable areas in the 
■vicinity where planting may be done, so all trees produced in the nursery will be 
used to the best advantage. 

The other small display nursery located at Erving has proven very successful 
from all standpoints. Several hundred people visited this nursery last year and 
there is no doubt that the increased interest in reforestation work was in manyl 
cases awakened as the result of such visits. 

State Forests. 

Since the last annual report 11,000 acres have been added to the area of the 
state forests 3,700 acres of which are divided among three new forests, while the 
balance represents additions to exisiting forests. 



P.D. 73. 13 

As in previous years, first importance has been given to the opening up and 
reconstruction of old abandoned town and logging roads and the opening of new- 
ones in order that the forests may be accessible for fire fighting, general adminis- 
tration purposes and for those of the general public who wish to make use of them 
for recreational purposes. 

Private land owners made such heavy demands on our nurseries through the 
purchase of stock that comparatively few trees were left for spring planting on 
state forests. In order, however, that we should not get too far behind in our 
planting program, we tried the experiment of fall planting on several of our forests. 
We have attempted fall planting in a small way in previous years and often have 
had excellent success. 

The year was a dry one with a large deficiency- of rainfall. In spite of the fact, 
the forest fire conditions in the state as a whole were much better than we had 
a right to expect. The State forests, however, were badly hit, four of them suffering 
from fire, two, Myles Standish and Shawme, severely. 

The work on these forests has been greatly facilitated by the addition of three 
Ford trucks, one at October Mountain, one at Savoy and one at Otter River. 
With two trucks at Myles ' Standish we have a fleet of five for use in State forest 
administration. These trucks are not only used on the forests on which they are 
stationed but serve other forests in the neighborhood. 

Savoy M ountain Forest. 

The roads were maintained by cutting the roadside brush on about 18 miles 
and 8 miles were repaired by ditching, clearing culverts and filling gullies. Thir- 
teen thousand four-year spruce were set in the field near the Burnett house and 
the Lewis Hill nursery was enlarged by transplanting therein 350,000 two year 
spruce. 

Mohawk Trail. 

Seven stone fire places were made at the camp sites between the highway and 
Cold River. These camp sites were in constant use all summer, as many as 46 
auto parties occupying them at one time and it required nearly all the time of 
» one man to clean up after the automobilists who frequented these camp sites and 
other spots along the Trail. On Labor Day 6,000 autos passed over the Trail in 
both directions. Ground has been broken for a small demonstration nursery to be 
located near the Totem Trading Post. 

Wendell Forest. 

Six miles of wood road were cleared of brush and the brush burned, 42,000 four 
year white pine transplants set in old mowings and pastures in the southeast part 
of the forest. The New England Power Co. has constructed a transmission line 
250 feet wide across this forest during the past year. 

Erving Forest. 

Four miles of roads formerly cleared have been brushed again and one mile of 
new road built running from the State Highway towards Laurel Lake. 130,000 
two year seedlings were transplanted into the nursery on the state road and a 
tool house and portable camp for the nursery caretaker erected. Five thousand 
four year transplants were set out on the forest. 

Mi. Grace. 

During the past winter we cut 270 cords of chestnut and pine logs on this forest 
which were sold to the New England Box Company. We should have cut more 
but the very deep snow prevented extensive woodland operations. Ten thousand 
four year larch were planted in the Manning pasture, the west trail to the North- 
field road cleared and a new east trail to the Winchester road built. Underbrush 
along the Northfield road was cleared on a strip 125 feet wide for about one half 
mile. 

Otter River. 

Eighty thousand four year old trees, white and Scotch pines were transferred 
to the field and 400,000 two year old seedlings were transplanted into the nursery. 
Fire lines along the railroad were cleared of brush and one mile of new fire line 



14 P.D. 73. 

plowed. One mile of wood road was repaired by renewal of rocks and filling of 
gullies, and the bridge over Otter River repaired in cooperation with the town. 
A liberation cutting of birch was made in a 15 acre plantation of larch and white 
pine. During the early fall the crew of this forest collected 40 bu. of red pine 
cones and minor repairs were made on buildings. 

C drain Forest. 

Fifty thousand four year spruces were set out in this forest under contract 
during the fall, brush cleared on both sides of two miles of road and weevil- 
infested tips cut and burned in the older pine plantations. 

Harold Parker Forest. 

Five new fire lines, two on the east side and three on the west side of Salem 
Street were cut to a width of 40 feet. . Several acres of land on which the oak 
growth was killed by fire or gypsy moths were thinned and 100 cords of wood 
salvaged which were sold at a good price. Some minor repairs were made in the 
road on Salem St.. although this is a town way and should be maintained by the 
town of North Andover. Plantations were made by the use of 30.000 larch and 
10,000 pine but because of the dryness of the summer they have suffered heavy 
loss and may have to be filled in. 

Swann arid Beartoicn Forests. 

The roadside brush on 2h miles of roads was cut and burned. Twenty-five 
thousand four year spruce were set in Beartown Forest and 8.000 pine in Swann. 
The old sheep barn on the Swann estate was sold to a Great Barrington contractor 
and has been torn down and removed. The standing chestnut was sold to a lumber 
operator, but after cutting a few dozen poles he became discouraged at the labor 
situation and gave up the work. The dry weather affected the hay crop so that 
very little was salable. A crew of seven college boys worked through the summer 
eradicating currants and gooseberries to prevent the spread of pine blister rust 
and covered the Swann area (1,000 acres). 75,000 two year spruce were trans- 
planted into the nursery. 

October Mountain (Whitney Tract). 

On this forest fifteen miles of road were cleared of brush and on 7| miles brush 
previously cut was again mowed over. Some repairs on the main road such as 
clearing ditches and filling ruts were effected. Extensive repairs were made on 
buildings. The headquarters house was shingled and some old sheds adjacent 
to the French and Huban places were torn down. A stable was built inside the 
big hay barn and the former horse barn transformed to a garage. A telephone 
line was extended to the Clark House. One hundred and fifty acres were mowed 
over partly to salvage the grass and partly for fire protection. One hundred and 
fifty thousand four year old spruce were planted in the pastures between the 
headquarters house and the Whitney mansion and 400,000 two year seedlings 
were transplanted into the nursery. 

October Mountain (Schermerhorn Tract). 

On this section of the forest 7h miles of old roads were brush-cleared and 6 miles 
of new road cut. A cesspool was constructed for the Felton house and other minor 
repairs made. All the chestnut on this tract estimated at 600-700M ft. was sold 
to a local operator who has already commenced logging. 

GramiUe-Tolland Forest. 

The hay around Coe and McGrannis houses was mowed for fire protection and 
other mowings where grass was too poor to sell were burned over. The Coe house 
has been rented to a lumber operator. Blister rust work was completed on the 
Granville section by removal of ribes on the portion not covered last year. 
Twenty-five thousand spruce were set in Granville section. Repair work was 
done on the telephone lines to the McGrannis house and the fire tower. The 
town road from E. Otis to the Curtin Cabin (Tolland section) had to undergo 
considerable repairs in places to make it passable by motor. 



P.D. 73. 15 

Myles Standish Forest. 

The sprout growth at the side of some ten miles of roads has been remowed and 
.a new form of fire line constructed on the College Pond road (east) and Halfway 
Pond road (east) about eight miles in length. On either side of these roads a 
strip 12 feet wide has been plowed about 12' back from the roadway which being 
.about 10' wide makes a fire line 50' to 60' in width and this when completed will 
divide the forest into quadrants. The new 5 ton tractor was of great assistance 
in the construction of these lines. That efficient fire lines are greatly needed was 
made evident when on August 26 a large fire starting off the state forest, burned 
-about 500 acres of our land together with 1,500 acres of land outside. Fortunately 
the burned area had not been reforested and so no serious damage was done. Our 
fire fighting equipment on this forest has been increased by the addition of a 
Howe-Ford pump, a loan from the Federal Government from its war time equip- 
ment. 

Less planting was accomplished than for several seasons past, but 104,000 three 
year Austrian pines were set in the area burned over by the fire just mentioned, 
^md 375,000 two year Austrian pines were transplanted to the nursery. 

.The camp sites on the various ponds have become very popular and over 150 
Are now leased. The picnic grounds on College Pond are in constant use especially 
on Sundays and holidays. In this connection it may be said that these campers 
formed an excellent fire fighting force at the time of the fire of August 26-27. A 
road has been completed around Fearing Pond in order that all the camp sites on 
this pond may be accessible. 

This forest is a game sanctuary where game is protected and propagated. The 
superintendent raised 150 pheasants, 50 of which were liberated on the forest. 
Deer have become too plentiful and they are injuring the young pines in the 
nursery and plantations. 

Shawme Forest. 

A great fire in Sandwich and Bourne which devastated an area of more than 
12,000 acres burned over the whole of this forest in May. Fortunately very little 
■development work had been done on this forest and the growth was mostly scrub 
oak so that the loss to the Commonwealth was largely confined to about 40 acres 
of young plantation. It is realized that nothing can be done to this forest until 
it is given adequate fire protection. A crew of men is now at work clearing out 
roads and constructing fire lines. In order to house this crew a substantial camp 
capable of containing a dozen men was built at the north end near the state high- 
way. 

Area of the State Forests, November 30, 1923. 



Name of Forest Acreage 

Arthur Warton Swann 986.75 

Beartown 6,452 . 1 

Colrain . 1,126.694 

Conway . 1,141.18 

Erving 3,491 . 9 

Harold Parker 1,327.6 

Hawley 850. 

Leominster 525 . 47 

Mohawk Trail 5,026.5 

Mount Grace 1 ,065 . 825 

Myles Standish 7^757 . 

Oakham 313. 

October Mountain 12,111.3 

Otis 885. 

Otter River 1,760.75 

Pittsfield 884.64 

Sandisfield 1,319.5 

Shawme . ' 1,338.36 

Savoy Mountain 5,809.4 

Tolland-Granville 3,377. 



16 

Name of Forest 
Wendell . 
Worthington . 
TJnassigned land . 

Total 63.592.289 

Report of the State Fire Warden. 
Mr. Wu. A. L. Bazelet, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with the provisions of section 28, chapter 48 of the 
General Laws, I submit herewith a report of the work accomplished by this branch; 
of the division during the year just ended. 

The season of 1923 was a comparatively favorable one from the standpoint am 
forest fire protection, although a large number of fires occurred during the spring 4 
months before vegetation was sufficiently advanced to prevent them. 

While our reports show that fires occurred frequently during the entire season, 
the vigilance and energy of our organization was such as to enable us to extinguish 
them in their incipient stage except in a very few instances. Our fire season began 
in the early part of March, and from that time until the first of June, there was 
very little rainfall. During this period we had two serious forest fires, the first 
occurring in Douglas and burning over 9.000 acres of so-called cut-over lands. The 
story of this fire affords a striking example of the result of insufficient care in] 
extinguishing fires. Originally a small fire had started and was supposed to have] 
been extinguished. The next day, however, with a high wind blowing, it broke 
out again with the disastrous result noted above. The second fire was in the 
towns of Bourne and Sandwich and burned over 17.000 acres of land well covered 
with pitch pine and scrub oak. I am convinced that the large acreage burned 
over by this fire was absolutely due to improper methods such as the setting of 
back fires by the local organizations. Unfortunately many of the residents of 
* the Cape do not place sufficient value on their forested areas and consequently 
are not concerned about fires until their buildings are in danger. During the 
season forty-six buildings were destroyed as a result of forest fires. A garage, 
barn and contents were burned in Canton: in Weston, a house and barn; Tyngs- 
borough, a summer camp and garage, while Billerica suffered the loss of eight 
summer cottages. 

On October 10 we were called on to assist in the extinguishment of an extensive 
peat bog fire in the town of Norwood. This fire had been burning seven weeks 
and the smoke had become so dense that there were times even during the day 
when it was practically impossible to operate with safety automobiles, street 
cars or even railroads in that section of the state. Not having proper equipment 
to cope with a fire of this nature, an appeal was made to the Governor and Council 
and they immediately responded with an appropriation of $3,000. With this 
appropriation was purchased one Fairbanks & Morse and two Great Northern 
pumps and 2,000 feet of hose. With this apparatus, supplemented by two of our 
own pumps, after three weeks of steady work the fire was extinguished. 

Owing to the long continued drouth immediately prior to the opening of the 
hunting season, Lieut. Gov. Fuller, Acting Governor, issued a proclamation sus- ] 
pending the season until a sufficient amount of rain had fallen as to eliminate 
dangier from fire. Fortunately for the sportsmen of the Commonwealth, the 
season was closed only one day as heavy rains relieved the situation. 

I wish to express my grateful appreciation of the valuable aid rendered by the 
State Constabulary, not only in assisting in the work of extinguishing fires but! 
in the enforcement of the fire permit and slash law. Inasmuch as this patrol 
force is to be increased in the near future with additional stations and motorized j 
apparatus, I look forward with pleasureable anticipation to still greater aid from I 
this valuable branch of the public service. 

A new fifty-eight foot steel tower was erected at the summit of Mount Toby ] 
in the town of Sunderland on lands owned by the Commonwealth and used as & j 
demonstration forest by the Amherst Agricultural College. This tower was pur-j 
chased by the college and erected by this department. Four miles of telephone! 
wire was installed to connect this tower with the New England Telephone lines.] 



P.D. 73. 
Acreage 
3.503.52 

•225. 
2.313.8 : 



P.D. 73. 17 

The thirty-eight foot tower that has been in use on Berlin Mountain in the 
town of Williamstown for the past six years was removed four miles farther south 
to Mount Brodie in the town of Hancock where we will be able to protect a much 
greater area of Massachusetts forest lands. It was necessary to erect six miles of 
telephone line to the town from this tower. 

A new telephone line has been installed at the Falmouth observation station 
and several of our towers in the eastern part of the state have been repainted. 

Transmission power companies have cut several miles of new lines through 
the state and brush from their cuttings Is now being burned. These rights of 
way will make excellent fire lines when completed. 

The law requiring operators of portable saw mills and other persons engaged 
in lumbering operations to file with this office a statement giving the location of 
such operations has met with the general approval of all operators and 140 reports 
were filed. This information proved to be of great value inasmuch as it enabled 
our district men to visit the scene of operation and render advice with respect 
to the disposition of slash at a very minimum expense to the Commonwealth. 

The permit law has been generally enforced by the town forest wardens. It 
was necessary, however, to discontinue the issuance of them throughout the 
eastern part of the state at different times during the long drouths but this was 
generally approved by the public. Forty-two thousand permits were issued 
throughout the state. Fifteen parties were fined and sixty-seven paid the cost 
of extinguishment for violating the permit law. 

During the month of February forest fire conferences were held at Middle- 
borough, Boston, Worcester, Springfield and Pittsfieid. These meetings were well 
attended by forest wardens, selectmen, patrolmen from the state constabulary 
and railroad employees. At the Springfield and Pittsfieid meetings representatives 
from the forestry departments of Connecticut and New York were in attendance. 
The discussions which took place at these meetings covering a great variety of 
topics bearing on the forest fire problem were of great value. 

Another important conference was the one held at the State House on Feb- 
ruary 20. This conference was made up of representatives from all the New Eng- 
land states and New York, and by special invitation Mr. Claude Leavitt was 
present representing the Canadian Government. There were also present several 
officials from the Federal Forest Service. Several important topics were discussed 
including standardizing forest fire damages, interstate co-operation, fire plan maps, 
educational publicity, slash disposal, Federal co-operation and methods of handling 
co-operative accounts. This meeting was adjourned to the next day when it was 
joined by representatives of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, Boston & 
Albany, Boston & Maine, Central Vermont, Grand Trunk, Bangor & Aroostook, 
New York Central, Delaware & Hudson, and Long Island railroads. This con- 
ference was largely devoted to a discussion of those questions which have a direct 
bearing on fires caused by railroads. 

For several years we have endeavored to impress upon the railroads the benefit 
which would accrue if they should take advantage of the law to enter upon prop- 
erty adjoining their rights of way with the consent of the owner and dispose 
leaves, brush and other inflammable material. It was not until this spring, how- 
ever, that any attempt was made along this line. Following a very careful surrey 
made this spring by railroad officials in company with representatives of this 
department, extensive work was done along this line. The reports which we have 
received from the railroads indicate that a very great reduction in the annual fire 
damages paid by the several companies resulted from this cleanup. 

Co-operative work between this department and the Federal Government has 
been continued. Mr. C. R. Tillotson of the Forest Service spent two weeks during 
the past season traveling about the state accompanied by our district men, and 
expressed himself much pleased with the systematic working of our prevention 
system. 

The amount received from the Federal Government under the Weeks Law Fund 
was $10,752.26. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. C. Hutchtss, State. Fire Warden. 



18 P.D. 73. 

COMPAKATIVE DAMAGES BY FOREST FlRES FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS. 



Year. 


Number 
of Fires. 


Acreage 
burned. 


Cost to 
extinguish. 


Damage. 


Average 
Acreage 
per Fire. 


Average 
Damage 
per Fire. 


1921 . 


2,849 


29,221 


$34,065 


$121,790 


10.25 


$42 75 


1922 . 


4,099 


85,241 


101,714 


501,648 


20.79 


122 38 


1923 . . 


2,672 


48,602 


51,448 


161,043 


18.18 


60 27 



Types of Classified Damages. 





1922. 


1923. 


Standing trees 

Logs, lumber, cordwood 

Buildings 

Bridges, fences 

Miscellaneous 


$285,754 00 
79,935 00 
63,308 00 

6,918 00 
58,326 00 

7,407 00 


$83,019 00 
43,244 00 
16,317 00 

397 00 
17,761 00 

305 00 


Totals 


$501,648 00 


$161,043 00 


Types of Land burned over (Acres). 




1922. 


1923. 


Timber 

Second growth 

Second growth, not merchantable . 


7,828 
16,508 
20,214 
29,163 
11,528 


1,235 
6,970 
17,124 
19,802 
3,471 


Totals 


85,241 


48,602 



Forest Fires of 1923. 



Months. 


Number. 


Acres. 


Cost to 
extinguish. 


Damage. 


1922. 

December .... 


36 


241 


$325 00 


$575 00 


1923. 

January .... 
February .... 

March 

April , 

May . . . . 

June 

July 

August 

September .... 
October .... 
November .... 


3 
6 

207 
1,088 
486 
109 
81 
129 
109 
288 
130 


54 
2 

754 
8,671 
34,163 

507 

130 
1,389 

634 
1,659 

398 


8 00 
14 00 
1,224 00 
12,638 00 
19,016 00 
2,087 00 
830 00 
4,657 00 
2,237 00 
7,606 00 
806 00 


25 00 
17 00 
603 00 
45,237 00 
95,382 00 
4,086 00 
889 00 
5,392 00 
2,663 00 
5,437 00 
737 00 


Totals .... 


2,672 


48,602 


$51,448 00 


$161,043 00 



P.D. 73. 19 

Classified Causes of Forest Fires, 1921-1923. 





1921. 


1922. 


1923. 




Number. 


Percent. 


Number. 


Percent. 


Number. 


Percent. 


Railroad ..... 


862 


30.25 


1,511 


36.86 


1,006 


37.65 


Lumbering .... 


4 


.14 


4 


.09 


4 


.15 


Brush burning .... 


327 


11.48 


545 


13.99 


241 


9.02 


Campers ..... 


12 


.42 


30 


.07 


49 


1.84 


Incendiary .... 


52 


1.83 


131 


3.19 


58 


2.17 


Miscellaneous .... 


537 


18.85 


952 


23.21 


750 


28.07 


Unknown .... 


1,055 


37.03 


926 


22.59 


564 


21.10 


Totals 


2,849 


100.00 


4,099 


100.00 


2,672 


100.00 



Railroad Fires of 1923. 



Railroad. 


Mileage. 


Number 
of Loco- 
motives. 


Number 
of Fires. 


Acreage 
burned. 


Cost to 
extinguish. 


Damage. 


New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Boston & Albany 
Boston & Maine 
Central Vermont 


1,883 
979 
2,017 
71 


922 
354 
1,025 
23 


719 
92 
187 
8 


5,551 
560 
766 
79 


$5,790 
844 
2,243 
127 


$16,817 
1,079 
7,604 
172 


Totals .... 


4,950 


2,324 


1,006 


6,956 


$9,004 


$25,672 



Report of the Superintendent of Moth Work. 
Mr. Wm. A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir : — Following the practice of previous years, I am pleased to submit for your 
information a report of progress made in the work of suppressing the gypsy and 
brown-tail moths during the fiscal year ending November 30, 1923. Work was 
vigorously prosecuted along the general lines found to be desirable and effective 
in the past. The continued cheerful co-operation of the city and town authorities 
has been exceedingly helpful and indicates on their part a just appreciation of 
the importance of protecting the forest, shade and orchard trees in the Common- 
wealth from the ravages of these insects. 

General Conditions. 

It is with satisfaction that I am able to report general conditions less severe 
than in former years. It is true, as stated in our report for the year 1922, that 
gypsy moth infestations have now been found in nearly every city and town in 
the Commonwealth. Careful scouting operations that have been carried on in 
the western part of the state show that the infestations in nearly all of the towns 
west of the Connecticut River are slight and can be easily controlled. I cannot 
urge too strongly the importance of fall scouting operations when this work can 
be done more efficiently and at a much less expense than after the snow has fallen. 

In the gypsy moth infested areas in the eastern part of the state where gypsy 
moth work has been carried on for many years, I am pleased to state that very 
little defoliation was noted. This improved condition was especially noticeable 
in the so-called Cape district where in previous years widespread defoliation 
prevailed. During the past season defoliation was noted in only three or four 
towns. A few instances of defoliation were also found in the northern part of the 
state and these areas will be given special attention during the coming season. 
Credit for this improved condition should be given to the earnest and increased 
efforts of the local authorities in the several towns in combating the insect. 

In most of the cities and towns scattering webs of the brown-tail moths were 
found and destroyed. Because of the extreme vigilance used to discover and 
destroy the webs of this insect we are confident that the coming season this insect 
will be reduced to a negligible quantity. 

I desire to take this opportunity to acknowledge the thorough work done under 
the direction of Professor W. C. O'Kane, State Entomologist of New Hampshire, 



20 P.D. 73. 

in removing the brown-tail webs in* the southern New Hampshire towns bordering 
on the Massachusetts line. As a result of this work the Massachusetts border towns 
show a marked decrease in the number of webs of tins insect. 

State Highway Work. 

As in former years the protection of the shade trees bordering the state highways 
from the ravages of injurious insects was performed under the direction of tliis 
department. The egg clusters of the gypsy moth were creosoted; brown-tail moth 
webs were removed and destroyed and the trees carefully sprayed. As usual, the 
work was performed by the local organizations or by the traveling sprayers owned 
by the state, our division superintendents having immediate charge of the work. 

Special North Shore Work. 

In previous reports we have referred to the extensive operations that have been 
carried on to protect the beautiful woodlands along the North Shore. This work 
was begun in 1908 and was made possible because of the foresight and activity of 
Colonel William D. Sohier who organized a committee of wealthy summer resi- 
dents of that section, and from the inception of the work to the present time they 
have earnestly co-operated with this department. During the year just ended 
rough creosoting work was done along thirty miles or more of wood drives and 
in approximately 3,600 acres of woodland. The creosoting work was followed by 
spraying operations with excellent results. At no time since the war began have 
conditions been more encouraging. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Smith, Superintendent of Moth Work. 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts. 
By A. F. Burgess. 

The field work of the Bureau of Entomology has been carried on during the past 
year principally in Berkshire County. In the spring of 1923, scouting was carried 
on and later the infestations discovered were thoroughly sprayed. The territory 
that has been covered during the fall indicates that the infestations were not quite 
as serious as those that were found the previous year. The spring of 1923 was 
very favorable for spraying work and excellent results were secured. 

In the fall the storehouse of the Bureau was moved from Franklin, New Hamp- 
shire to Pittsfield, Mass., and the buildings selected there will be used for the 
storage, repair and distribution of field supplies for the western part of the New 
England area. 

The inspection of nursery, forest and quarry products has been continued under 
the regulations prescribed by the Federal Horticultural Board. The require- 
ments relative to shipment of nursery stock have been made more stringent during 
the past year owing to the fact that a few egg clusters of the gypsy moth escaped 
the attention of the inspectors and were shipped to outside territory. A special 
effort is being made to require all nurseries to keep their grounds and premises 
free of the gypsy moth infestation, and the condition of stock offered for shipment 
in the fall of 1923 was more satisfactorj r in this respect than heretofore. 

The gypsy moth laboratory has been maintained at Melrose Highlands and has 
conducted a number of lines of important research work. Parasites have been 
colonized in sections of the state where it has been impossible to liberate them 
earlier on account of lack of material. Foreign investigations were carried on 
during the spring and summer by Dr. J. N. Summers in Japan, and in Europe by 
Mr. S. S. Crossman and Mr. R. T. Webber. Gypsy moth infestations were very 
scarce in Japan, which made it difficult to secure parasites for shipment. Surveys 
were made in Spain, France, Italy, Germany, Poland, Austria and Hungary during 
the year. In the regions visited gypsy moth infestation was slight except in Spain 
and Hungary. From the latter country it was possible to secure several large ship- 
ments of Tachinid parasites. These arrived in Melrose in good condition and 
are now in hibernation. Whether the species concerned will come through the 
winter satisfactorily cannot be determined until next summer. It seems probable 



P.D. 73. 21 
however, that at least one of the species will make a very valuable addition to the 
imported enemies of the gypsy moth. 

Sample collections made from different sections of the state during the year 
indicate that the parasitism of the gypsy moth averages higher than at any time 
heretofore. In the region that has been longest infested the density of infestation 
has decreased rapidly, and these useful enemies of the gypsy moth have played an 
important part in supplementing the field work that has been done in the towns 
throughout the state. 

The brown-tail moth has not been seriously abundant except in limited areas, 
although the number of winter webs reported from some of the towns show a 
considerable increase over the previous year. The sample collections made of this 
insect from different localities indicate a high mortality due to the work of the 
imported parasites. 

APPENDIX. 
Financial Statement. 



Receipts and Expenditures for Year ending November 30, 1923. 



Purpose of Appropriation. 


Amount. 


Refunds 

and 
Balances. 


Expendi- 
tures. 


Balance 
to 1924. 


Balance to 
Treasury. 


Salary of Commissioner .... 


$5,500 




$5,500 


00 










10,600 




10,198 


09 




$401 


91 


Expenses of Commissioner .... 


250 




229 


82 




20 


18 




6,700 


$7 70 


4,771 


80 




1,935 


90 


General Forestry and Nurseries . 


'13,500 




9,574 


85 




3,925 


15 


Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands 


10,000 


984 67 


6,666 


33 




4,318 


34 


Prevention of Forest Fires .... 


48,000 


10,752 26 


58,750 


04 




2 


22 


Protection against Forest Fires . 


2,000 




1,978 


98 




21 


02 


Reimbursement for Fighting Fires 


1,000 




134 


95 




865 


05 


Suppression of Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths 


130,000 


89,548 69 


174,987 


22 


$44,561 47 






Maintenance of Forests .... 


25,000 




24,903 


07 




96 


93 


Purchase and Development of State Forests 


150,000 


103,344 74 


147,606 


61 


105,738 13 






Maintenance of Mount Grace 


1,000 




947 


38 




52 
9 


62 


Maintenance of Standish Monument . 


1,500 




1,490 


43 




57 


Repair of Myles Standish Statue 


2,000 




100 


00 


1,900 00 






Special Appropriation for Norwood Fire 


3,000 




2,996 


21 




3 


79 




$410,050 


$204,638 06 


$450,835 78 


$152,199 60 


$11,652 68 



Receipts 

For lumber sold ' §7,116 93 

For cord wood sold 686 00 

For sale and rent of buildings / 645 00 

For hay and other products 203 00 

For right of way over land 1,000 00 

For rent of camp sites 872 00 

For miscellaneous 6 70 

For examinations 135 70 

For trees 8,495 90 

For redemption of lots 3,893 78 

For sale of books and cards 28 10 

For sale of products from reforestation lots 1,022 41 

For damages 188 00 

For supplies for gypsy moth work 15,219 35 

For donations to North Shore Fund 2,000 00 

For private work on North Shore 697 80 

For highway work 2,783 45 

For supplies for fire fighting 2,712 04 



Total for year 



847,706 16 



22 P.D. 73. 

Statement of Expenditures and Receipts on State Forest for the Year 
ending, November 30, 1923. 



State Forest. 



Arthur Warton Swann 
Bear Mountain 
Col rain 
Conway 
Erring . 
Harold Parker 
Hawley 
Leominster 
Mohawk Trail 
Mount Grace 
Myles Standish 
Oakham 

October Mountain 
Otis 

Otter River . 
Pittsfield 
Sandisfield 
Savoy Mountain 
Shawme 

Tolland-Granville 
Wendell 
Worthington 
Unassigned land 



Planting 

and 
Nursery. 

SS21 26 
230 38 
S00 00 

730 07 
280 SS 



233 71 
91 00 

2,261 47 
6S 25 

2,466 92 

1,994 29 



2,107 43 



765 17 
617 10 



General 
Upkeep, 
Fire Lines 
and Roads. 

$2,610 13 
37 00 
450 00 
10 00 
1,242 58 
2,637 02 



1,307 69 

925 50 

6,272 99 

9,415 09 

2,547 55 



2,001 14 
648 19 

3,422 82 
337 50 



$13,467 93 $33,865 20 $15,657 44 



Surveying, 
Titles, etc. 

$12 00 
1,729 69 
32 25 

822 54 
1,096 76 
1,378 13 

829 28 
864 29 

452 36 
2 78 
3,040 82 



442 S3 
253 15 
729 14 
2,375 85 
1 02 
1,505 11 
89 44 



Land. 



$5,225 00 
2,650 00 
2,350 00 
6,618 25 
1,317 00 
3,737 50 
1,836 50 
2.571 50 



440 00 
4,660 00 
3,292 50 



4,250 00 
1,806 50 
319 80 
888 00 
2,681 50 
1,500 00 
9,699 87 



Total. 



$3,443 39 
7,222 07 
3,932 25 
3,182 54 
9,687 66 
5,613 03 
3,737 50 
2,665 78 
4,977 19 
1,016 50 
8,986 82 
511 03 

19,582 83 
3,292 50 
4,541 84 
442 83 
4,503 15 
6,644 21 
3,343 84 
5,077 01 
5,141 21 
1,589 44 
9,693 87 



$55,843 92 $118,834 49 $10,029 63 



The Distribution of Supplies. 

Supplies have been furnished to towns and cities for gypsy moth work as usual. 
The amounts given below do not correspond with the amount of aid given to the 
municipalities, as some towns make payment to the State for all or a part of the 
bill for supplies, according to the amount of their net expenditure and their class, 
under the provisions of section 4, chapter 132 of the General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement and for expenditures, 
see table on page 23. 

List of Towns and Amounts of Supplies furnished for 1923. 



Acton • 


. $795 


19 


Essex 


. $316 91 


Ashburnham . 


374 


29 


Foxborough 


959 46 


Ashby . 


828 


59 


Freetown 


363 62 


Ashland . 


542 


43 


Georgetown 


. 1,051 88 


Avon . 


257 


80 


Groton 


878 38 


Bedford . 


. 2,274 


51 


Groveland 


378 58 


Berkley . 


332 


39 


Halifax . 


597 32 


Berlin . 


488 


75 


Hanover . 


. 2,217 69 


Bolton . 


835 


29 


Hanson . 


656 05 


Boxborough 


715 


40 


Harvard . 


. 1,465 20 


Boxford . . . . 


. 1,085 


29 


Harwich . 


. 1,054 69 


Boylston . 


408 


25 


Holbrook 


366 69 


Brewster . . . . 


541 


04 


Holden . 


489 15 


Bridgewater 


904 


53 


Holliston 


487 75 


Burlington 


754 


37 


Hopkinton 


452 02 


Carlisle 


928 


32 


Hubbardston . 


2 40 


Carver . 


. 1,605 


38 


Kingston 


438 26 


Chatham 


49 


75 


Lakeville 


997 62 


Dennis . 


592 


90 


Lincoln . 


. 1,613 69 


Dover . 


. 1,460 


51 


Littleton . 


. 1.537 66 


Dracut . 


. 2,433 


90 


Lunenburg 


. 2,007 72 


Dunstable 


370 


48 


Lynnfield 


644 86 


Duxbury .... 


. 1,203 


52 


Marion . 


. 1,446 31 


East Bridgewater . 


. L374 


10 


Marshfield 


. 2,970 11 


Eastham .... 


338 


52 


Mashpee 


434 35 


Easton . 


. 1,513 


90 


Medfield . 


911 66 



P.D. 73. 

Merrimac 
Middleton 
Newbury 
Norfolk . 
North Reading 
Northborough 
Norton . 
Norwell . 
Oakham . 
Orleans . 
Pembroke 
Pepperell 
Plainville 
Plympton 
Princeton 
Raynham 
Rochester 
Rowley . 
Salisbury 
Sandwich 
Sherborn 
Shirley . 
Southborough 
Sterling . 

Automobile supplies 

General Forestry and Nurseries . ' . 

Maintenance of Forests 

Special North Shore Fund .... 
Prevention of Forest Fires .... 
Purchase and Development of State Forests 
Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands 

Shop Equipment 

Travelling Sprayers and Highways 



$306 


64 


btow 


527 


89 


Sudbury , 


1,281 


95 


Templeton 


293 


05 


Tewksbury 


2,133 


35 


Tisbury . 


1,857 


44 


Topsfield . 


401 


80 


Townsend 


915 


25 


Truro 


2 


20 


Tyngsborough 


606 


93 


Wayland . 


1,252 


68 


ITT 11 /S J_ 

Wellfieet . 


758 


57 


Wenham . 


352 


87 


West Boylston 


251 


21 


West Bridgewater 


390 


73 


West Newbury 


446 


55 


Westborough . 


521 


55 


Westford 


738 


67 


Westminster . 


884 


74 


Weston 


1,226 


76 


Wilmington . 


899 


25 


Winchendon . 


653 


29 


Yarmouth 


1,739 


57 




621 


42 







23 


$1,194 


53 


2,353 


46 


88 


89 


1,354 


87 


532 


74 


471 


08 


336 


33 


212 


97 


1,055 


36 


1,067 


17 


326 


59 


415 


35 


486 


13 


2,042 


41 


651 


89 


600 


46 


1,482 


79 


393 


46 


811 


33 


1,776 


75 


6 


69 


776 


JO 


$83,187 


50 


$1,073 


15 


159 


62 


196 


47 


3 


20 


747 


85 


141 


67 


5 


36 


4 


07 


1,317 


06 


$3,648 45 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and Cities 

for the Year 1923. 





1923. 


1924. 


Cities and Towns. 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Private 
Work. 


Reimburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 














State. 




Abington 


$1,775 73 












$2,325 08 


Acton .... 


991 67 


$1,125 73 


$72 75 


$134 06 


$795 19 


$929 25 


1,088 65 


Acusb.net 


1,269 91 












1,417 76 


Adams .... 


4,395 33 












6,802 69 


Agawam 


2,405 67 












2,363 96 


Alford .... 


87 32 












110 60 


Amesbury 


4,186 33 












4,729 57 


Amherst 


2,992 98 












3,256 24 


Andover 


4,787 33 












5,000 00 


Arlington 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Ashburnham 


593 89 


942 61 


110 15 


348 72 


374 29 


723 01 


722 80 


Ashby .... 


376 03 


445 24 


Ld. 492 20 


69 21 


828 59 


897 80 


497 26 


Ashfield 


426 49 


101 00 










458 71 


Ashland 


805 09 


1,258 22 


53 75 


453 13 


542 43 


995 56 


939 80 


Athol .... 


3,813 74 












4,762 04 


Attleboro 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Auburn 


1,243 43 


195 70 


86 75 








1,137 48 


Avon .... 


605 28 


605 21 


72 85 




257 80 


257 73 


617 94 


Ayer .... 


1,256 77 












1,347 47 


Barnstable 


4,414 44 












4.409 96 



24 



P.D. 73. 



1923. 



Cities and Towns. 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 


lotal Net 
Expen d i- 
tures. 


Private 
Work. 


Reimburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

o* 0m 
otate. 


Barre .... 


$1,286 72 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


Becket r 


330 34 


_ 

1 

$1,394 52 ^ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Bedford 


1,025 29 


Ld$l,015 95 
78 40 


1 

| $369 23 


$2,2/4 51 


$2,643 74 


Belchertown . 


485 44 


- 




- 


- 


Bellingham . 


723 46 




- 




- 


- 


xjv in l un l . • 


5 000 00 












Berkley 


291 97 


323 94 


75 00 


31 97 


332 39 


364 36 


Berlin .... 


360 76 


392 79 


149 14 




488 75 


488 75 


Bernardston . 


261 49 


79 21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


BeVerlV 


5,000 00 












Billerica 


2',85? 14 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Blackstone . 


917 10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Blandford 


389 12 


30 00 


- 


- 

} 


- 


- 


Bolton .... 


380 47 


388 51 j 


Ld. 20 00 
306 01 


835 29 


835 29 


Boston .... 


5,000 00 




_ 


_ ■ 


Bourne .... 


2,688 67 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Boxborough . 


139 36 


i 

67 85 { 
346 81 


Ld. 27 00 

359 96 




715 40 


643 89 


Boxford 


412 38 


178 73 




1,085 29 


1,019 72 


Boylston 


275 32 


201 75 


403 12 


_ 


408 25 


334 68 


Braintree 


5,000 00 


[ 

942 55 t 
1,987 15 




_ 






Brewster 


449 72 


475 95 
Ld. 30 68 


l ACIO CO 

f 4»i oo 


541 04 


1 ftOO 0"? 

1,033 o7 


Bridgewater . 


1,965 35 


1,952 25 


21 80 


904 53 


926 33 


Brimfield 


404 07 












Brockton 


5,000 00 








- 


- 


Brookfield ... 


443 62 


437 18 


82 90 








Brookline 


5,000 00 






: 


_ 


_ 


Buckland 


956 28 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Burlington 


608 36 


395 25 


277 66 


_ 


754 37 


541 26 


Cambridge . 


5,000 00 






_ 






Canton .... 


2,586 14 . 


_ 

654 24 s 


_ 


_ 

1 _ 
r 417 13 




_ 


Carlisle .... 


237 11 


Ld. 213 12 
251 83 


928 61 


1,345 45 


Carver .... 


973 18 


f 

1,148 84 { 


Ld. 89 70 
717 28 


| 177 66 
- 


1 CAE OO 

l,o0o 38 


too n 

1,783 04 


Charlemont . 


317 99 


109 00 


_ 


_ 


- 


Charlton 


657 50 




_ 


- 


- 


- 


Chatham 


1,337 98 


_ 


_ 


- 


49 75 


- 


Chelmsford . 


2,684 74 


_ 


_ 






_ 


Chelsea 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Cheshire 


388 68 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Chester 


412 03 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


Chesterfield . 


173 32 


425 71 


16 37 


262 39 


- 


252 39 


Chicopee 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


Chilmark 


187 90 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Clarksburg . 


246 13 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Clinton 


5,000 00 




_ 


- 


- 


- 


Cohasset 


2,786 12 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


Colrain .... 


547 11 




_ 


- 


- 


- 


Concord 


3,012 99 






- 


- 


- 


Conway 


376 17 


229 06 


36 50 








Cummington 


161 83 






_ 


_ 


_ 


Dalton .... 


2,132 02 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


Dana .... 


274 17 


207 42 


59 11 


- 


- 


- 


Dan vers ... 


3 739 39 












Dartmouth . 


3^456 69 


_ 


z 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Dedham 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


Deerfield 


1,841 44 


661 58 ( 






- 


- 


Dennis .... 


656 68 


Ld. 93 60 
407 46 


V 


592 90 


592 90 


T~)i (rVi f nn 


1,300 53 










Douglas 


'623 24 


_ 


_ 




_• 


_ 


Dover .... 


1,188 66 


f 

1,143 04 \ 


Ld. 259 48 
455 67 


1 
/ 


1,460 ol 


1,414 89 


Dracut .... 


1,356 10 


2,182 19 


641 58 


826 09 


2,433 90 


3,259 99 


Dudley 


1,353 18 












DuilSttlljiG • • 


180 56 


373 33 [ 


Ld. 34 32 
268 95 


| 192 77 


370 48 


663 25 


Duxbury 


1,786 31 


2,209 73 1 


Ld. 13 00 
870 69 


J 423 42 


1,202 45 


1,625 87 


E. Bridgewater 


1,522 65 


1,394 6? 


1,005 20 


1,374 10 


1,246 12 


E. Brookfield 


334 59 












E. Longmeadow . 


870 96 












Eastham 


280 57 


639 37 


168 00 


358 80 


338 52 


697 32 


Easthampton 


5,000 00 













1924. 



P.D. 73. 



25 





1923. 


1924. 


Cities and Towns. 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Jrrivate 
worK. 


Reimburse- 
ment. 


1 ools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 






1 










State. 




Easton .... 


$1,887 70 


$1,853 74 1 


Ld. $6 30 

723 40 


\ 
/ 


— 


$1,513 90 


$1,479 94 


$2,395 90 


.c-dgartown 


810 57 


- ' 


- 






- 


- 


793 36 


Egremont 


278 65 


- 


- 






- 


- 


386 10 


.cnueici .... 


298 04 


- 


- 






- 


- 


007 9/1 
oo < o4 


Erving .... 


743 07 


- 


- 






- 


- 


946 93 


564 34 


616 60 


900 25 




$52 26 


316 91 


369 17 


622 21 


Everett 


5,000 00 




- 








— 


- nnn nn 
o.uuu uu 


Fairhaven ... 


3,914 07 


- 








- 


- 


1 AQ1 A £ 
o,DOo *0 


'Foil PivAr 
x. all ivivtrr 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


<; nnn nn 
o.uuu uu 


Falmouth ■ 


4,603 67 


- 


- 






- 


- 




Fitchhurg 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


r. nnn nn 
O.UUU DO 


"Flnri rl a 

X 1UI ILltt .... 


529 41 


- 


- 






- 


- 


595 13 


Foxborough 


1,349 27 


1,393 50 


450 00 






959 46 


959 46 


1,515 62 


Framins^ham 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


£ nnn nn 
o.uuu UU 


"Fro nlrli n 


2,581 39 


- 


- 




_ 


- 


- 


3,037 42 


Freetown 


584 00 


782 52 


155 20 




198 52 


363 62 


562 14 


648 38 


{jardner . . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


c nnn nn 
O.UUU UU 


vjray xieaa 


30 51 


- 


- 






- 


- 


28 57 


Georgetown . 


635 02 


846 66 


638 53 




211 54 


1,051 88 


1,263 42 


Aon nn 
Ooy UU 


Gill 


ZOl 00 














321 24 


viiuutco itrr ... 


5,000 00 


- 








- 


- 


£ nnn nn 
O.UUU UU 


\JrL/oUt7H ...» 


128 27 














144 79 


Gosnold 


425 57 


- 


- 






- 


: 


421 63 


Grafton 


1,934 84 


968 79 


- 




_ 


- 


- 


2,635 47 


GranHy . 


368 64 


_ 


- 




- 


- 


- 


466 38 


Granville 


239 49 


203 40 


22 30 






- 


- 


304 31 


Great Barrington . 


3,372 55 


- 


- 






- 


- 


4,307 32 


VJI . . . 


5,000 00 




- 




_ 


- 


- 


c nnn nn 
0,Vvv UU 


Greenwich ... 


0O£ 7n 




Ld. 302 12 
989 76 




- 






241 40 


Groton .... 


1,320 29 


1,432 24 1 


1 
f 


Ill 95 


878 38 


990 33 


1,441 03 


Groveland 


668 45 


709 16? 

1 


350 90 

T A no. QA 

Lid. vo oo 


\ 
j 


40 71 


375 58 


416 29 


685 05 


Hadlev 


1,142 84 










- 


- 


OO 


llttllltlA .... 


397 15 


410 23 


1,086 97 




13 08 


597 32 


610 40 


388 14 


Hamilton 


1,787 25 


- 








- 


- 


2,007 19 


Hampden 


196 50 


- 


- 






- 


- 


221 79 




167 29 




- 




_ 


- 


- 


192 99 


Hanover 


964 43 


1,051 53 1 


Ld. 44 60 
730 91 


I 


87 10 


2,217 69 


2,304 79 


1,089 89 


.Hanson 


743 23 


1,036 6? 


625 80 


293 39 


656 05 


949 44 


905 lo 


Tiard wick 


1,329 53 


283 53 


122 10 


} 




- 


- 


1 AQR 07 


Harvard 


821 85 


797 97 1 


Ld. 415 45 
137 72 


- 


1,465 20 


1,441 32 


867 47 


Harwich 


1,027 06 


975 93 


1,378 18 


_ 


1,054 69 


1,003 56 


1,034 01 


Hatfield '. ', 


1 nAK OQ 
I ,U00 00 








- 






1,230 41 


Haverhill 


5,000 00 




- 






- 


- 


siooo 00 


Haw lev 


108 33 


212 50 


- 




104 17 


- 


104 17 


124 53 


Heath 


124 74 


102 35 


67 30 






- 


- 


181 25 


Hingham 


Q 70n ao 














3,914 81 


TT i tiqH q If* 

XX 1 llovitlltr ... 


333 62 


_ 








z 


z 


385 98 


T~Tnl Krr»rklr 

11U1U1 UOJtV • • , 


1,003 85 


1,000 31 


351 75 


\ 
1 




366 69 


363 15 


l,01o bo 


Holden .... 


1,044 95 


1,152 82 1 


Ld. 79 56 
418 50 


107 87 


489 15 


597 02 


1,163 84 


Holland 


73 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


82 38 


Holliston 


1,086 16 


588 08 ( 


Ld. 34 15 
452 56 


i 
J 


- 


487 75 




1,162 28 


Holyoke 


£ nnn nn 
O.UUU UU 












5,000 00 


Hopedale 


1,389 14 




_ 

Ld. 6 62 
171 65 






_ 


_ 


3,349 33 


Hopkinton . 


855 39 


680 56 'y 


- 


452 02 


276 69 


903 27 


Hubbardston 


413 94 


375 90 


- 


) 




2 40 




451 04 


Hudson 


2,471 86 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


2,929 63 


Hull 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Huntington 


409 59 


296 25 


- 






- 


- 


500 68 


Ipswich 


2,876 32 


- 


- 






- 


— 


2,871 41 


Tv i n trctr»n 


828 91 


926 70 


388 50 




97 79 


4S8 26 


536 05 


869 45 


Lakeville 


522 27 


915 57 | 


226 30 
Ld. 177 59 


} 


393 30 


997 62 


1,390 92 


56? 38 


Lancaster 


1,092 34 














1,518 84 


Lanesborough 


371 82 














407 78 


Lawrence 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Lee .... 


1,544 72 














2.311 81 


Leicester 


1,184 64 


12 80 


143 10 










1,679 19 


Lenox .... 


2,834 19 














3,079 43 


Leomi/ister 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Leverett 


180 33 














225 90 



26 P.D. 73. 



Cities and Towns. 


1923. 


1924. 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Private 
Work. 


Reimburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State. 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 


T . 

Xjexinsiton ... 


$4,352 68 


- 






_ 


- 


- 


SI ^Q'i 39 

v * • ■ ■ ' Oil 


Leyden .... 


114 21 


$138 60 


$24 40 




$24 39 


- 


$24 39 


141 11 


Lincoln .... 


878 43 


1,771 25 


569 00 


> 

J 




$1,613 69 


1,613 69 


927 85 


Littleton 


685 20 


47 02 1 


31 75 
Ld. 897 20 




1,537 66 


899 4S 


690 16 


T j 

L^onsrmeuciow . . 


2,335 47 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


2,367 34 




5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


t nnn nn 


-LUGlOW .... 


3,510 31 








- 


- 


- 


3 747 71 


Lunenburg . 


743 02 


183 86 1 


A7Q AT 
4/0 4/ 

Ld. 398 19 


1 
/ 


- 


2,007 72 


1,448 56 


761 84 


L nn 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


t nnn nn 


Lynnfield 


862 81 


1,053 97 


581 25 




191 16 


644 86 


836 02 


869 87 


Maiden .... 


5,000 00 


- 






- 




- 


5.000 00 


Manchester . 


4,745 87 














5.000 00 


Mansfield 


2,547 51 


_ , 


_ 






_ 


_ 


2,837 24 


^larblehead ... 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




_ 


- 


- 


5^000 00 


arion .... 


1,390 86 


1,510 19 


590 39 




- 


1,446 31 


1,446 31 


1,486 54 


Marlborough 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 


— 


siooo 00 


Marshfield . 


1,375 71 


1,379 32 1 


1,498 13 
Ld. 62 14 


\ 
f 




2,970 11 


2,970 11 


1,354 29 


.Masnpee . 


229 83 


1,611 69 


608 00 




1,381 86 


434 35 


1,816 21 


242 70 


Mattapoisett 


879 11 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


947 30 


Mavnard 


2,157 89 


- 


- 


\ 
/ 


- 


- 


- 


2,527 51 


Medfield 


890 79 


1,124 67 1 


380 93 
Ld. 26 00 


Oil 08 
Zoo oo 


911 66 


1,145 54 


964 20 


Med ford 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


t nno oo 


\!edway . • . 


1,000 87 


- 


- 




_ 


- 


- 


1,101 94 


Melrose .... 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


k nno nn 


Mendon 


365 48 




- 




- 




- 


376 02 


Merrimac 


735 45 


1,146 37 ^ 


310 06 
Ld. 24 00 


i 


A 1 f\ Q9 

4iu \>z 


306 64 


717 66 


800 97 


.Metnuen 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 




- 


5,000 00 


Middleborough 


2,897 27 


- 


- 




- 




- 


2,936 92 


AiiciQieneiu. . . 


113 73 


- 


- 




- 




- 


140 94 


Middleton 


479 75 


639 84 


311 30 




160 09 


527 89 


687 98 


481 36 


..vj morel .... 


4,9?1 19 


- 


- 




- 




— 


5,000 00 


.>iiiinury 


1,857 01 


- 


- 




- 


— 


- 


2,189 15 


Millis 


848 38 


- 


- 




- 




- 


L038 34 




546 37 


- 


- 




- 




- 


668 31 


Milton .... 


5.000 00 


- 


- 




: 






5,000 00 


.Monroe .... 


194 97 


- 


- 






- 


- 


239 14 


Monson 


831 13 


- 


- 




- 




- 


1,079 54 


Montague 


3,799 66 


- 


- 




— 




- 


4^574 48 


Monterey 


206 84 


- 


- 




_ 




— 


232 76 


Montgomery 


78 27 








- 






100 35 


Mount Washington 


69 06 








- 






90 27 


Nahant ... 


1,735 84 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


2,091 84 


Nantucket 


2,852 66 


- 


- 




- 




- 


2 472 30 


Natick .... 


4,016 60 


— 


— 




- 






5,000 00 


Needham 


4,742 59 


- 


- 




- 


- 




4.934 64 


.New Asntora 


36 55 


- 


- 






- 




48 54 




5.000 00 


- 


- 






— 




5,000 00 


New Braintree 


210 50 


- 


- 




- 






231 64 


New Marlborough 


532 62 


- 


- 




_ 






641 09 


New Salem . 


231 75 


- 




i 


_ 






246 44 


Newbury 


749 65 


1,685 43 1 


814 25 
La. 6oo iv 


no- 70 


1,281 95 


2,217 73 


1,089 52 


XT U 

.New bury port 


5.000 00 






- 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Newton 


5,000 00 


- 






_ 


- 


- 


5 000 00 


Norfolk 


557 75 


760 20 


259 75 




202 45 


293 05 


495 50 


629 89 


North Adams 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




— 


- 


- 


5.000 00 


North Andover 


3,086 00 


397 04 


127 00 






- 


- 


A 171 9B 

4, I/O ZO 


North Attleboroutjh 


3,565 05 


- 


- 










4,210 31 


.North rirooKtielu . 


915 68 


- 


- 








- 

2,371 98 


1,074 89 


North Reading 


664 06 


902 69 


510 00 




238 63 


2,133 35 


655 87 


Northampton 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


~ 


5,000 00 


North borough 


835 09 


462 89 | 


500 89 
Ld. 284 13 


} 




1,857 44 


1,485 24 


889 14 


XT _iUu' - J 

-North bridge . 


9 fi79 RR 












4,949 85 


-Northnela 


716 51 














760 15 


Norton .... 


883 23 


1,101 80 


294 23 




218 57 


401 80 


620 37 


936 11 


Norwell 


584 06 


1,034 49 


1,052 24 




450 43 


915 25 


1,365 68 


642 47 


Norwood 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Oak Bluffs . 


1,298 62 










2 20 




1,226 8S 


Oakham . . i f 


183 20 


101 24 


157 73 








193 67 


Orange .... 


2,078 71 














2,328 56 


Orleans . 


692 46 


904 43 


759 14 




211 97 


606 93 


818 90 


698 50 



P.D. 73. 



27 





1923. 


1924. 


Cities and Towns. 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Private 
Work. 


Reimburse- 
ment. 


Tools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 
















State. 




Otis .... 


$169 50 








- 






$177 12 


Oxford .... 


999 13 








- 






1,190 82 


Palmer .... 


4 371 09 








- 






4,605 41 


Paxton .... 


206 34 


$152 09 


$313 51 










sw yo 


I CalJUU^ ... 


r. ooo on 
o,uuu uu 














5,000 00 


Pelhtim ... 


220 53 




771 85 
Ld. 572 00 




- 






253 76 


Pembroke 


642 11 


f 

1,295 74 1 


t 


$653 63 


$1,252 68 


$1,906 31 


634 63 


Pepperell 


1,186 47 


1,377 46 ( 


303 04 

T A ins jit 


/ 


139 75 


758 57 


898 32 


1,349 54 


Peru .... 


120 00 








- 


_ 


_ 


110 48 


Petersham . 


576 33 


318 15 


112 15 




- 


- 


- 


618 14 


x niiiipston 


149 53 


298 72 


61 70 




149 19 




149 19 


165 17 


Pittsfield 


5 flflfl oo 








- 






5,000 00 


Plainfield 


116 29 


175 49 






59 20 




59 20 


124 48 


Plainville 


489 69 


924 57 


155 80 




434 88 


352 87 


787 75 


751 24 


Plymouth. . . . 


ooo on 

V,UUU UU 




217 45 
Ld. 112 00 




- 






5,000 00 


Plympton 


241 12 


450 57 { 


I 
/ 


209 45 


251 21 


460 66 


261 37 


Prescott ... 


117 69 


f 

677 45 [ 

I 




} 


- 






130 99 


Princeton 


533 40 


108 19 
T.H 144 95 

ljU. lit 


144 05 


390 73 


534 78 


505 54 


Provincetown 






- 






1,683 30 


Quincy 


h 000 00 








- 






5,000 00 


Rsndolph 


1,278 18 


_ 


_ 




— 


_ 


_ 


1,412 96 


Raynham 


582 95 


754 43 


475 15 




171 48 


446 55 


618 03 


580 95 


Reading 


3,944 08 














4,221 89 


Rehoboth 


690 46 














'703 28 


Revere .... 


t non no 
o,uuu uu 








- 






5,000 00 


Richmond 


247 22 














269 50 


Rochester 


440 47 


756 85 






316 00 


521 55 


837 55 


515 84 


Rockland 


2,685 13 














3 103 3fi 


Rockport 


1,904 51 








- 






2,055 83 


Rowe .... 


108 42 


193 47 


12 00 


I 
/ 


— 






'l42 58 


Rowley 


468 00 


1,535 71 1 


458 00 
Ld. 262 64 


1 067 71 


738 67 


1,806 38 


531 27 


Royalston 


415 88 




- 






508 85 


Russell .... 


1 ,UUU 1 o 








- 






1,481 77 


Rutland 


A99 1 


160 28 


159 13 




- 






492 11 


Salem .... 


£ 000 00 
U,UUU UU 






} 


- 






5 000 00 


Salisbury 


1,031 89 


734 82 { 
I 


615 81 
Ld 71 37 


- 


884 74 


587 67 


1,062 69 


Sandisfield 


99Q A1 


1,091 15 1 
- 


_ 






220 85 


Sandwich 


681 98 


75 20 
Ld. 202 76 


i 


409 1 7 


1,226 76 


1,635 93 


718 47 


Saugus 


3,584 67 


- 


- 


- 


5 fiU CO 
o,uiu oO 


Savoy 


97 69 




~ 




- 






114 40 


Scituate 


3 216 19 








— 






3.150 24 


Seekonk 


1 91 A Q9 














1,096 24 


Sharon .... 


1 fiOfi 54 

l,OUO O^ 








- 






1,651 94 


Sheffield 


466 61 








- 






664 63 


Shelb urn e 


954 13 
















Sherborn 


722 50 


806 76 


800 27 




84 26 


899 25 


983 51 


813 47 


Shirley . . . . 


753 97 


756 89 


155 50 


1 

/ 


— 


653 29 


653 29 


992 28 


Shrewsbury . 


2,112 02 


1,455 65 1 
30 35 


427 90 

JLiU. lot Zo 




- 


- 


2,069 06 


Shutesbury 


156 01 


14 45 


- 






180 98 


Somerset 


1,197 13 








- 




_ 


1 245 93 


Somerville 


5,000 00 










- 


- 


o,uuu uu 


South Hadley 


2,311 73 










— 






Southampton 


319 10 


514 16 


85 14 




- 






329 42 


Southborough 


1,172 95 


1,222 28 1 


DZO OS 

Ld. 38 12 


} 




1,739 57 


1,739 57 


1,373 10 


Southbridge . 


4,595 52 


■ - 






_ 


- 


- 


t ooo no 

o,uuu uu 


Southwick 


476 56 














629 81 


Spencer 


1,587 32 














1.772 59 


Springfield . 


5,000 00 




54 69 
Ld. 156 00 










5,000 00 


Sterling 


612 73 


712 10 1 


} 


99 37 


621 42 


720 79 


638 80 


Stockbridge . 


2,267 34 












2,433 19 


Stoneham 


3,289 26 














3,294 15 


Stoughton 


2,544 05 




360 50 
Ld. 457 4o 


} 








2,655 28 


Stow .... 


638 85 


603 61 1 




1,194 53 


1,159 29 


681 68 


Sturbridge . 


492 50 


247 40 








559 55 


Sudbury 


678 35 


670 03 1 


150 25 
Ld.432 62 


} 




2,353 46 


2,345 14 


949 06 



28 P.D. "3. 





1923. 


1Q9J. 
V31A. 


Cities and Towns. 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures. 


.Private 

Wnrlr 

wont. 


Reimburse- 
ment. 


1 ools 
supplied. 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures. 
















State. 




Sunderland . 


$380 52 


- 








_ 


_ 


$426 06 


Sutton .... 


733 68 


- 


- 






- 


- 


942 75 


Swampseott . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Swansea 


922 64 


- 


- 




_ 


- 


- 


952 26 


Taunton . • • 


5,000 00 


— 








~ 




5,000 00 


Templeton 


1,056 41 










$88 89 


~ 


1^354 47 


Tewksbury . 


1,209 84 


$2,194 40 


$687 51 




$984 56 


1,354 87 


$2,339 43 


1,270 39 


Tisbury 


1,029 79 


690 48 


56 50 






532 74 


193 43 


1,038 03 
151 22 | 


Tolland 


134 29 


- 


- 

263 06 
Ld. 56 75 


\ 




- 


- 


Topsfield 


1,023 74 


809 89 1 


- 


471 08 


257 23 


1,196 62 


Townsend 


830 61 


777 00 


461 25 




336 33 


282 72 


912 39 


Truro .... 


253 55 


329 67 


111 00 




76 12 


212 97 


289 09 


295 94 


Tyngsborough 


414 25 


1,409 08 


745 58 




994 83 


1,055 36 


2,050 19 


413 76 


Tyringham . 


154 03 


- 


- 






- 




201 43 


Upton .... 


580 82 










— 


— 


653 02 


Uxbridge 


2,530 05 








_ 






2,863 14 


Wakefield 


r AAA AA 

5,000 00 


- 






- 






5,000 00 


Wales .... 


147 30 




- 






- 


- 


177 56 


Walpole 


3,630 55 




- 






- 


- 


3,875 00 


Waltham 


5,000 00 


— 


— 




_ 






5,000 00 


Ware .... 


2,915 47 








- 






3,271 36 


Wareham 


3,425 84 




- 






- 


- 


3 516 97 


Warren .... 


1,687 61 


176 00 


- 




- 


- 


- 


L939 81 


Warwick 


197 37 














235 25 


Washington . 


88 82 








_ 






144 54 


Watertown . • . 


5,000 00 


- 

847 70 1 


- 




- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Way land 


1,654 01 


576 30 
Ld. 129 00 


1 
i 

/ 


- 


1,067 17 


260 86 


1,733 70 


Webster 


3,955 26 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


5.000 00 


Wellesley 


5,000 00 






1 

1 


_ 






5,000 00 


Wellfleet 


375 36 


512 96 1 
_ 


196 45 
Ld. 5 72 


137 60 


326 59 


464 19 


424 25 


Wendell 


290 50 


~ 




- 


- 




403 79 


Wenham 


1,115 00 


844 80 


489 08 


! 




415 35 


145 15 


1,291 66 


West Boylston 


606 62 


340 01 1 


400 45 
Ld. 117 88 




486 13 


219 52 


556 64 


West Bridge water 


902 10 


1,613 21 1 


674 63 
Ld. 63 18 




711 11 


2,042 41 


2,753 52 


895 45 


West Brookfield . 


447 70 


416 21 | 

- 




_ 


- 


- 


570 45 


West- Newbury 


446 70 


313 28 
Ld. 156 78 


/ 


- 


651 89 


621 40 


472 22 


^^est Springfield 


5,000 00 


- 




_ 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


West Stockbridge . 


380 31 


- 


- 




_ 






400 68 


West Tisbury 


252 42 














272 81 


West borough 


1,561 96 


921 34 


670 16 




_ 


600 46 




1,659 34 


Westfield 


5,000 00 




~ 

661 75 
Ld. 600 00 


I 




~ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Westford 


1,287 67 


1,355 94 1 


- 


1,482 79 


1,482 79 


i,y<jy 04 


Westhampton 


128 21 


171 55 

432 82 1 


45 84 


i 

I 


43 34 


~ 


43 34 


149 47 


Westminster . 


483 23 


344 55 
Ld. 160 94 


- 


393 46 


343 05 


520 63 


Weston .... 


2,415 90 


793 26 


~ 


_ 


811 33 




2,585 58 ' 


Westport 


1,871 41 


- 


- 






- 




1,984 97 


Westwood 


1,157 89 


- 


- 




fv lie? 


- 




1,241 34 


Weymouth 


5,000 00 


- 


- 






— 


- 


5,000 00 


Whately 


366 41 


121 00 


- 




- 






433 39 


Whitman 


2,574 45 


- 


- 








- 


2,862 98 


Wilbraham 


928 87 


- 


- 










1,129 34 


Williamsburg 


503 08 


- 


- 






~ 




646 08 
2,510 54 


Williamstown 


2,175 61 














Wilmington . 


1,045 35 


1,660 46 


649 22 




615 11 


1,776 75 


2,391 86 


1,058 48 


Winchendon . 


2,042 03 


1,836 18 


239 46 






6 69 




2,565 40 


Winchester 


siooo 00 














5,000 00 


Windsor 


152 95 














171 37 


Winthrop 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Woburn 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Worcester 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Worthington 


184 87 


189 22 












226 15 ! 


Wrentham 


846 39 














877 50 


Yarmouth 


902 43 


1,036 22 


416 56 




220 34 


776 53 


996 87 


1,041 58 ! 



I ... ^ cj r-i i 

PudIic Document . No 73 

=J± ?^t____ 

Wt>t Commontoealtf) of itlaasaaeijuisttts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Commissioner of Conservation 



AND 



State Forester 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1924 



ffoi^Q/ , ; Department of Conservation 



*1 




Publication of this Document 
approved by the 
Commission on Administration and Finance 



1600 2-27-25 Order No. 1027 C 



dm 19 11 

CONTENTS 

Conservation of Fore^T^. Wrt . .. . 3 

Conservation of Wild Xife c . "V V?£ 3 

Conservation of Domestic Animals rrn . 4 

Forest Fires . . . fWS 5 

State Forests 

Standish Monument Reservation . . 

White Pine Blister Rust 

Lectures and Conventions 

Exhibits 

Recommendation, Forestry 7 

Recommendation, Fisheries and Game 

Division of Forestry 

New Legislation 

Organization 

State Plantations S 

Forest Survey 10 

Examinations 10 

Nurseries 10 

State Forests 11 

Report of State Fire Warden 14 

Report of Moth Superintendent 17 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work 19 

Appendix, Financial Statements 20 



OUTLINE OF REPORT 

This report is divided for convenience and economy into four parts: — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of Con- 
servation. 

Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 

Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume as Public Document No. 73. 
Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 25. 
Part IV. is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 98. 




OTfje Commontoealtf) of f$Ia$sacf)ugett£ 

Pajblt 'I 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 



The terra conservation is broad enough to cover all forms of management 
designed to eliminate waste, safeguard the future and secure the best balance 
between immediate utility and future value. It is an economic problem pure 
and simple and may be applied to a great many subjects. The name was* 
deemed an appropriate one for this department for the reason that the func- 
tions of the three divisions of which it is comprised include the perpetuation 
and development of forests, the propagation and protection of wild life and 
the prevention, control and eradication of contagious diseases of domestic 
animals, all of which may properly be considered important economic prob- 
lems relating to the public welfare. 

During the past year the work of these divisions has advanced satisfac- 
torily. The Commissioner of the Department and the directors of the divi- 
sions have met frequently as the law provides to discuss matters of more 
than ordinary moment and to determine departmental policies. Ten such 
meetings have been held and records kept of the business transacted. 

The commissioner desires to express his appreciation of the generous act 
of the Forestry Commission of Scotland in sending to us an especially selected 
lot of Scotch pine seed. 



History shows that the importance of preserving and perpetuating the 
forests in any country has never been fully appreciated until their lavish 
use and destruction by fire and other ^agencies have practically dissipated 
them. It is the duty of a government to provide for the common welfare 
of its citizens. This principle, applied to the state of Massachusetts, imme- 
diately suggests as the first important step, the wisdom of making the land, 
the source of wealth, produce revenue to its fullest capacity. For many years 
the forests of the Commonwealth had been cut and the lumber used for in- 
numerable purposes until only a few were left. Then began a slow awakening 
and about twenty years ago thinking people began to realize the imperative 
need of adopting and carrying forward a constructive forest policy, the pur- 
pose of which should be to replace in as large a measure as might seem prac- 
ticable the wild, unproductive lands of the Commonwealth with forested 
areas. The General Court, responding to this demand on the part of the 
people, passed an act creating a forestry department and subsequent laws 
have defined and extended its duties and prerogatives, under which the 
forestry interests of the state have rapidly advanced. With the state forests 
already acquired, the activity of cities and towns in establishing municipal 
forests, and private land owners planting millions of trees as a nucleus, we 
may now look hopefully forward to the time when Massachusetts will once 
more be producing all the timber needed for her requirements. 



During the year the country witnessed the calling in Washington of a 
National Recreation Conference, presided over by some of the departmental 
heads and sponsored directly by the President of The United States. The 
deliberations of this conference revealed perhaps more fully than ever before 
in our history, the close relationship between the hours of recreation of our 
people and our forests, fields and streams and the wild life populating all 
these areas. It is difficult to name many branches of national recreation that 
are not more or less inseparably tied in with one or all of these elements. In 
the past we have looked on our forests purely as a commercial proposition' 
The time will come when a given forest area will not only be considered from 
the standpoint of its value when reduced to lumber, but rather whether such 



Conservation of Our Forests 



Conservation of Wild Life 



4 P. D. 73 

value is equal to the greater and more permanent benefit to a community of 
the aesthetic and health-giving returns resulting from maintaining a forest 
of growing trees and not a forest of stumps and dead and blackened timber. 

The suitableness of the area for wild life protection and propagation will 
become more and more of a consideration in making a decision as to whether 
or not a given forest area should be retained. The enlarged usefulness of 
such areas in our national and State and local programs of recreation will 
also be an important factor. While the dependence of many forms of wild 
life on the forests for living grounds has been fully understood, from the 
earliest days, it has taken time to force upon us as a people the conviction 
that there are many factors besides pure commercialism which should be 
considered. 

Conservation of Domestic Animals 

The relation of our domestic animals to public health, to production of fo 
and raiment, to agriculture, and to many lines of commercial industr\\ im 
poses the necessity of applying all the principles of conservation to the 
maintenance of this relation at a standard which its importance calls for 
the whole scheme of public welfare. 

When we consider that certain of our domestic animals furnish a large por- 
tion of our food supply by their products during life and by the utilization of 
their carcasses when slaughtered, that they are the original factors in the 
production of raiment for the people, that successful agriculture is not possi- 
ble without them, that many lines of business are dependent upon their use 
as toilers on the farm or servants in transportation, and that modern day 
progress in scientific protection of the public health is being rapidly accom- 
plished by their use in the laboratory, it can readily be seen that the func- 
tion of the Division of Animal Industry, in the control and eradication of 
contagious diseases of these animals and supervision of the sanitary conditions 
under which they are maintained, if efficiently executed, is one of true 
conservation of valuable resources. 

This Division is now doing extensive work in the eradication of bovine 
tuberculosis by the use of the tuberculin test. This work is of great value 
not only in the improvement of health conditions of live stock, but also in 
lowering the incidence of human tuberculosis due to bovine origin. This 
branch of the Division's service has developed very rapidly since the passage 
of the so-called tuberculin testing law, and it is receiving strong support not 
only by the cattle owner who has a laudable desire to eliminate disease from 
his animals, but also by public health officials who see a great step forward 
toward protection of the health of the people by further purification of the 
milk supply. 

Already a number of town and city boards of health have passed ordi- 
nances requiring that all raw milk sold in their municipalities shall have been 
produced by cows which have passed an official tuberculin test. 

The growth in public sentiment approving the present work now being 
done in eradication of bovine tuberculosis by co-operation of state and federal 
forces, and the activities of local health officials in the same direction, have 
resulted in a greatly increased demand for the service of this division in the 
tuberculin testing of cattle. 

This work during the present year has increased sixty-four per cent and we 
have on file large numbers of requests for the service with which we are 
unable to comply at present, waiting for additional appropriations by the 
legislature for the payment of indemnities for animals which react to the 
test. 

A continuation of the division's work according to its present policy of 
administration will require largely increased appropriations by the legis- 
lature, if the popular demand for it and public health requirements are to be 

satisfied. 

Legislation of 1923 passed in accordance with our recommendation has 
materially assisted in the administration of the so-called tuberculin test law 
and no additional legislation of this character is deemed necessary at the 

present time. 



P. D. 73 5 

We refer to the accompanying: report of the Director of Animal Industry 
for a detailed description of the service of this division. 



Forest Fires 

The first and most essential step in any forestry program is protection from 
fire. Obviously it is folly to plant at a large expense young forest trees if 
they are destined to burn up before maturity. Not only are the trees de- 
stroyed, but each time the land burns over a certain amount of humus is 
destroyed, thereby seriously retarding reproduction of tree growth. 

Forest fires lessen our opportunities for recreation. They destroy and 
drive away wild life. In fact the consequential damage in its varied forms 
caused by forest fires is difficult to estimate. 

The faculties and energies of our people must be applied to the work Of 
reducing this forest waste by fire. Through a process of education our citi- 
zens must be made to fully appreciate the value of the forests. Through 
the press and other forms of publicity they should constantly be reminded 
that the exercise of care in preventing forest fires is one of the duties of good 
citizenship. 

State Forests 

The purchase of land for state forests has continued through the year' 
A total of 16,324.3615 has been acquired in 1924. This land is distributed 



as follows: 

Acres 

Myles Standish State Forest 367.1875 

Otter River State Forest 23.46 

Savoy Mountain State Forest 725.5 

Beartown State Forest 395. 

Colrain State Forest 67.5 

Conway State Forest 118.94 

Erving State Forest 848.165 

Hawley State Forest 243. 

Leominster State Forest 112.23 

Mohawk Trail State Forest 106.6 

Mount Grace State Forest 496.7 

October Mountain State Forest 1,207.5 

Otis State Forest 246.8 

Pittsfield State Forest 197.9 

Sandisfield State Forest 397.7 

Shawme State Forest 1,147.78 

Wendell State Forest 348.55 

Windsor State Forest 630. 

New Forests 

Ashburnham State Forest 402.325 

Bash Bish State Forest 390.08 

Blandford State Forest 1,419.5 

Clarksburg State Forest 455. 

Hubbardston State Forest 507.5 

Monroe State Forest 1,593. 

Northfield State Forest 235.4875 

Peru State Forest . 1,060. 

Petersham Station State Forest 248.15 

Shutesbury State Forest 459. 

Sutton State Forest 209.5615 

Templeton State Forest 86.76 

Westminster State Forest 141.45 

Unassigned 1,436.035 



16,324.3615 



6 P. D. 7; 

Standish Monument Reservation 

The total number of visitors to the Monument, as reported by the care- 
taker during the season of 1924. was 66.430. During the first ten days 
after the opening of the Monument to the public the road was closed for 
repairs, and yet the number of visitors exceeded that of 1923 by about 
16.000. There were also thousands of visitors after the Monument was 
closed in the fall. 

The road of approach was thoroughly rebuilt at a cost of $2,500, and 
we estimate that a small amount annually will now keep this in repair. 

Some planting of small white and Scotch pine trees was made, and willows 
were planted around the water tower. 

The statue, which was damaged by lightning in 1922, has not as yet been 
repaired, owing to lack of funds, but an offer has been made of a gift of 
money to the state, sufficient to replace the statue as it was originally, and 
if the Legislature of 1925 makes the acceptance of this gift possible, the re- 
pairs will probably be made in 1925. 

White Pine Blister Rust 

The State Department of Agriculture reports that the stage of the disease 
as found on white pine has been reported in 21 additional towns in the 
state. This makes a total of 165 infected towns to date — November 30, 
1924. The results of the work carried on during the field season indicate 
that the educational and service work have been conducted even more suc- 
cessfully than in the past. As a result of this work, 2,544 property owners 
have taken some active part in co-operative control work, and have assisted 
in the uprooting of 1,411,166 wild and 38,777 cultivated currant and goose- J 
berry bushes on 150,876 acres of land. In carrying on this protective work, 
the co-operating owners have been willing to expend the equivalent of 
SI 1,527.04, at a total average cost of 19 cents per acre. As a further indi- 
cation of the effectiveness of educational work, it is interesting to note that 
1,564 owners were willing or at least did actually sacrifice their cultivated 
currant and gooseberry bushes without requesting reimbursement from 
the state. This fact represents a gain of 167 per cent in this type of 
co-operation and indicates an increasing interest in the protection of our 
white pine forests. 

Lectures and Conventions 

If interest in our forest problem is correctly represented by requests for 
lectures, then such interest must be increasing, because the number given 
by the Commissioner and his assistants in the Forestry Division was larger 
than ever before in the history of the department, namely 107. Many of 
these were illustrated by stereopticon and lantern slides and some with 
motion pictures. 

In addition, the department was represented at the following meetings 
and conferences outside of the state: 

Association of State Foresters, New Orleans, La. 
State Park Conference, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Timber Utilization Conference, Washington, D. C. 
New Hampshire Forestry Association, Peterboro, N. H. 
Connecticut Forestry Association, New Haven, Conn. 
Japanese Beetle Conference, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Exhibits 

The department put in an extensive exhibit at the Eastern States Fair 1 
in Springfield in the state building there. The central feature of this ex- 1 
hibit was a large relief map of the state on which all our state forests, fire I 
towers and other department properties were shown. On one side of the 1 
room there was a model of a small forest nursery and on the other side an 1 
extensive array of articles illustrating the use of wood in our industries. 1 
Enormous crowds attended this fair and our exhibit was consequently 1 
seen by tens of thousands. 



. D. 73 7 

Another form of publicity which has been of great value is furnished by 
a machine called a stereomotograph, which automatically shows ordinary 
lantern slides. By loading it with colored picture slides interspersed with 
others containing explanatory texts, it produces what amounts to a five- 
minute illustrated lecture on forestry. This machine is placed in a public 
library where it is left for a week or two and then moved to another. More 
than 30 libraries have already used this machine. 

Recommendations of the Department of Conservation 
Division of Forestry 

1. Relative to Hunting Season. The law which gives to the Governor 
authority to suspend the hunting season whenever in his opinion the 
use of firearms in the fields and woods will result in an increase in fires 
has been invoked during the past two years because of long-continued 
droughts. 

While each year an appreciable reduction in the number of fires followed 
such action, the Commissioner is convinced that the law should be so 
amended as to authorize the closing of the woods to all persons except the 
owners or their agents during periods of extreme danger from fire. 

Under the present law it is obligatory upon the Governor to suspend the 
open season for the hunting of birds and wild animals of every kind. Dur- 
ing the suspension of the open season this year it became evident that such 
a general suspension worked an unnecessary hardship upon those accus- 
tomed to hunting migratory waterfowl upon the coastal and inland waters 
of the Commonwealth and that such a far-reaching suspension of the hunting 
season is not necessarily essential to adequately protect the forest lands 
from the dangers of fire. The accompanying bill will allow the Governor 
to use his discretion as to the species of birds and animals on which a close 
season should be proclaimed. It is also desirable to give the Governor 
the right to rearrange the open seasons in a year when such extraordinary 
conditions exist in order to give the hunters the largest opportunities to 
hunt consistent with conserving the forests and the wild stock. 

2. Standish Monument. On August 6, 1920, the Standish Monument 
Association, acting under authority granted it by the General Court, con- 
veyed to the Commonwealth the monument and grounds in the town of 
Duxbury to be known hereafter as the Standish Monument Reservation. 
During the summer of 1922 the monument was struck by lightning and the 
statue of Captain Myles Standish which surmounts the monument was 
nearly ruined. 

Owing to the fact that the Legislature thus far has failed to make the 
necessary appropriation, the damage to the statue has not been repaired. 
The interest and sentiment felt for this historic reservation is attested by 
the fact that during the season of 1923 over 50,000 people visited the reser- 
vation. Recently a public-spirited person has offered to defray the entire 
expense of restoring the statue, but the Commissioner of Conservation, 
who is in charge of the reservation, finds that there is no authority allowed 
him under existing law to accept on behalf of the Commonwealth this 
generous offer. He, therefore, believes that legislation should be enacted 
empowering him to do so. 

3. To allow Persons in charge of Public Lands to permit the Hunting and 
Trapping of Certain Birds and Animals. Under the present law all of the 
public lands are game refuges, and for the benefit of useful birds and animals 
within those reservations, the persons in charge thereof should be empow- 
ered to issue permits allowing the hunting of predatory birds and animals 
which are an economic asset. Because of the damage caused by deer to 
young forest trees on the forest reservations, the Commissioner is of the 
opinion that he should be given authority to declare an open season for the 
killing of deer on forest reservations coincident with Section sixty-three, 
Chapter one hundred and thirty-one of the General Laws. 



8 P. D. 

Division of Fisheries and Game 

1. Relative to Sporting and Trapping Licenses. The budget commissi 
has taken the position that it will not recommend increases in the app 
priations for the Division of Fisheries and Game until the revenues ex 
the present appropriations. Last year the total sum appropriated 
$219,950. 

The total amount of the income from revenues and other sources 

$289,535.79. 

The increasing demand of law enforcement and artificial propagation 
order to keep the supply of wild life at least equal to the present drain 
through hunting, fishing, destruction by vermin, and the encroachments! 
civilization, will require from year to year increases in our appropriation 
over and above the 1923 figures. 

The only course open is to increase the license fees and to devise ways 
and means of decreasing the annual cost of distributing the licenses. While 
economies of operation are being constantly worked out. the ground has 
been so thoroughly covered that future improvement is not likely to be an 
important factor in offsetting failure to receive reasonable annual increases 
in appropriations. 

2. Relative to Search and Seizure under the Law respecting Fish and GamM 
Under existing law, no officer of the Division can obtain from any of our 
judges a right to search a dwelling house in order to obtain evidence of a 
violation of the fish and game laws. Short lobsters may be taken, and fish, 
birds and quadrupeds illegally killed, and if they can be gotten into a dwell- 
ing house they are safe from pursuit and the violators cannot be apprehended 
with their quarry. Unless our officers can have the use of search warrants 
under such conditions, with suitable safeguards to prevent any unreason- 
able violations of the right of privacy, it will continue to be extremely diffi- 
cult, if not impossible, to stop many persistent violations of the fish and 
game laws. 

3. Relative to Ruffed Grouse. The reports from all over the Commonwealth 
prior to the time that these recommendations must be filed indicate a scar- 
city of grouse in certain sections. The shooting season was so curtailed by 
reason of drought conditions that there was not the opportunity for as full 
an investigation based on actual field reports as was desirable. Under our 
practices, the open seasons, with the exception of pheasants, are determined 
by the Legislature. In order to cover the situation between now and the 
time of consideration by the Legislature, we are including this recommenda- 
tion. If subsequent reports show no legislation necessary, this recommenda- 
tion will be withdrawn in due course. 

4. Providing for a Close Season on Quail in Certain Counties. The stock 
of wild quail in certain counties is not sufficient to warrant the maintenance 
of an open season. The following legislation is in line with the policy of 
past years to keep the season closed in all such counties. 

5. Relative to Muslzrats. The protection and increase of the fur-bearers, 
particularly those which are more or less harmless, is highly desirable. The 
value of the annual catch of fur is substantial and affords some occupation 
for a number of our citizens. The muskrat is the most valuable fur animal 
in the Commonwealth. Because of the high prices of pelts, it has been 
reduced to the verge of extinction in many localities, and nowhere can be 
considered abundant. It should be given an opportunity to re-establiaB 
itself, while at the same time according to property owners (particular™ 
cranberry growers) the right at all times to protect property against destruo* 
tive operations by these animals. 



P. D. 73 



Part II 



9 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

The work of the Division of Forestry has proceeded along: the lines laid 
out for it by previous legislatures, and the same policies have been adhered 
to, giving special attention to the assisting by advice, encouragement, sale 
of seedling trees at cost, of private woodland owners. Our own program of 
purchase of forest lands was carried out, but the planting and developing 
of these state forests was somewhat handicapped by lack of funds. Almost 
all our program for forest planting in the fall had to be abandoned. 

New Legislation 

The state forest law was amended, giving the state forester the power to 
construct and maintain trails over the state forests, or other suitable places 
of scenic beauty. 

Power is given him to accept gifts for this purpose. 

Organization 

William A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner and State Forester 
Charles O. Bailey, Secretary 
Harold O. Cook, Chief Forester 

D. C. A. Galarneau, Forester in Western Massachusetts 
Frank L. Haynes, Asst. Forester, Land Purchase 
James Morris, Asst. Forester, Nurseries 

Robert B. Parmenter, Asst. Forester, Mapping and Reforestation 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden 
George A. Smith, Moth Superintendent 



District Forest Wardens 

1. James E. Moloy, Woburn 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River 

3. Joseph J. Shepherd, Pembroke 

4. John P. Crowe, Westborough 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield 

6. Jos. L. Peabody, Winchendon 

7. Verne J. Fitzroy, Savoy 



District Moth Superintendents 

1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly 

2. William A. Hatch, Marlborough 

3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill 

4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Foxborough 

5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay 

6. Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester 



State Plantations 

Five new lots were planted, two lots filled in and one lot replanted, the 
last three having been burned over. In addition to this, three others were 
finished, thereby bringing the total number of trees planted to 287.500. 
Our experience during the past years leads us to believe that we can plant 
successfully in the fall as well as during the spring, thereby increasing the 
number of trees set each year. 

Liberation cuttings were carried on on nine lots, and nine other lots were 
scouted for ribes. 

It is of utmost importance that all pine plantations should be protected 
from the ravages of this pine disease. 

Following is a list of the lots worked on during the past year, the name 
of the lot, location and nature of work done. 

Weeks, Sandwich — Thinning and improvement work, 20 acres. 

Barr, Spencer — Brush cutting, 16 acres. 

Clark, Holden — Liberation cutting, 50 acres. 

Fullum, West Brookfield — Liberation cutting, 70 acres. 

Holmes, West Brookfield — Liberation cutting, 25 acres. 

Browne, Marlboro — Liberation cutting, 45 acres. 

Perry, Falmouth — Planting, 17,000 trees. 

Leonard, Raynham — Release cutting, 16 acres. 

Le Clear, Brewster — 5,000 trees planted. 

Fullum, North Brookfield — Liberation cutting, 50 acres. 



10 P. D. 73 

Bazeley, Uxbridge — 6,000 trees planted. 
Spencer, Oakham — 40,000 trees planted. 
Baker Box Company, Royalston — 30,000 trees planted. 
Baker Box Company, Hubbardston — 45.000 trees planted. 
Taft, Uxbridge — 7,000 trees planted. 
Brewster, Plymouth — 63,000 trees planted. 
Baker-Hurd, Rutland — 10,000 trees planted. 
Baker, Warwick — 25,000 trees planted. 
Muggett Hill, Charlton — 500 trees planted. 
Crocker, Ashburnham — 39,000 trees planted. 
The total number of trees planted was 287,500, and 292 acres of liberation 
cutting was accomplished. 

Forest Survey 

Another portion of the state was covered during the past summer, thereby 
adding to our data on the extensive forest type survey of Massachusetts. 
Berkshire County was completed and a large portion of Franklin County 
was covered. We expect to finish this county during the ensuing summer. 
We find that the summer season is the best time to obtain forest data on 
reproduction, insect ravages, cut-over areas, etc. 

This information aids this department in determining its forest policy. 

Examinations 

Subject Number Acres 



Thinning • 5 517 

Insects and disease 11 260 

Planting 16 2,940 

Thinning and planting 17 5,200 

Estimating and operating 6 731 

Taxation 1 80 

General 4 285 

60 10,113 



The public demand for technical advice on the proper management of 
their woodland as well as the beautification of their home grounds has been 
very encouraging. It shows this department that the people as a whole 
have firmly grasped the significance of forestry and that this department 
can rely on public co-operation in the future. 

Over one-half of the examinations made were concerned with reforesta- 
tion. This is the aspect of forestry in which it is encouraging to see the 
people of the state interested. 

Nurseries 

During the past few years there has developed in Massachusetts a popular 
demand for low-priced planting stock for reforesting private lands. When 
the state nursery at Amherst was established several years ago, this demand 
was not foreseen. It was then the purpose of the department to produce 
trees only for its own use and the area of the old nurseries was limited. 
We feel that the public demand should be encouraged and have quietly set 
aside more land for nurseries, until now we are using all of our own lands 
suited to the production of nursery trees and yet are unable to fill orders 
from the public in amounts requested and still follow out our own increased 
reforestation program. 

In the past two years our nursery product has been increased from about 
10,000,000 trees to approximately 20,000,000 trees. Of the latter figure 
almost 6,500,000 are transplants and a large proportion of these will be 
ready for planting next spring. In all, next season we shall probably ship 
4,000,000 trees from our nurseries. Approximately 2,000,000 of this total 
will be set out on our state reservations. One million will be allotted free 
of cost to state institutions and municipalities having legally established 



P. D. 73 11 
town forests, while the remainder will be distributed at cost as far as 
possible to private individuals for planting within the confines of the 
Commonwealth. 

If it is possible for us to obtain suitable land to establish a new main 
nursery of about 70 acres, we hope to be able to produce 4,000,000 to 
5,000,000 trees for public distribution at cost each year. This production 
will be in addition to that for our own reservation work. 

The following is a list of our nurseries at present and an estimate of the 
stock of each: 



At Amherst Seedlings and transplants 10,300,000 

Bridgewater .... Transplants only . . . 2,000,000 

Barnstable Seedlings and transplants 2,200,000 

Myles Standish at Carver . . Transplants only . . . 500,000 

Otter River at Winchendon . Transplants only . . . 800,000 
Mohawk Trail Display Nursery at Charlemont 

Seedlings and transplants . 100,000 
Erving Display Nursery at Wendell Depot 

Seedlings and transplants . 250,000 

Savoy at Savoy .... Transplants only . . . 500,000 

October ML at Washington . Transplants only . . . 800,000 

Sivann at Monterey . . . Transplants only . . . 250,000 



Total 17,700,000 

In 1924 we distributed our transplants approximately as follows: 

Sold 1,200,000 

State Institutions 220,000 

Town Forests 176,000 

State Forests 1,200,000 

State Managed Lots 175,000 



Total 2,971,000 

In 1923 our transplant distribution was approximately as follows: 

Sold 1,125,000 

State Managed Lots 70,000 

State Forests 650,000 

State Institutions 136,000 

Town Forests 101,000 



Total 2,082,000 



Trees sold by us have been planted in practically every town in Massa- 
chusetts. 

State Forests 

Since the last annual report 16,324 acres have been added to the area of 
the state forests, 7,678 of which were added to present forests and the 
balance divided between six new ones. 

Owing to the reduction on our appropriations the work of developing 
these forests was seriously curtailed. This was particularly true of the re- 
forestation work, as it became necessary to abandon the fall program of 
planting almost entirely for lack of funds. 

In spite of one of the most dangerous fire seasons that the state has ever 
experienced in the fall months, our state forests fared very well. Fire 
occurred on the Otter River, Savoy and Erving Forests, but with the excep- 
tion of the Otter River forest, the damage was not serious. 

Savoy Forest. The roads were maintained by cutting brush and repairing 
ditches and culverts. On 50 acres of the Thayer pasture, which is thickly 
studded with young spruce, the growth was released by cutting out the hard- 
wood brush. About 19,000 feet of standing ash timber was sold to an 
operator for which the Commonwealth received $15 per thousand feet. 
Reforestation work consisted in putting in the ground 170,000 Norway 



12 P. D. 73 

spruces m the spring, and 39,000 in the fall. One hundred and forty thousand 
two-year-old seedlings were transplanted into the nursery and kept weeded 
along with the 350,000 transplants already there. 

Colrain F orest. Planting work was continued on this forest with 50 000 
spruce and 10,000 red pine during the spring and 50,000 spruce during' the 
tall. Roadside brush on about five miles of old abandoned highways was 
cut and two miles of new wood road opened up. White pine tips infested 
with the weevil were culled out on 200 acres of pine plantations. A bronze 
tablet was set m a large boulder at the corner of the main road leading into 
the forest. 

Mohawk Trail Forest. Forestry work on this forest was confined to a 
small amount of planting, 23,000 trees, white pine, spruce and hemlock 
having been set out. 

The automobile camp grounds were improved by the erection of six 
comfort stations and the installation of a water supply fed by a small reser- 
voir constructed on the hillside on the south side of the highway. Condi- 
tions were made better by the presence of a resident caretaker, who pains- 
takingly policed the grounds in return for the privilege of selling a few simple 
camp supplies to the autoists. He reports that the grounds were used over 
night by 1,050 auto parties, containing about 3,500 people, representing 
28 states and 4 Canadian provinces. Five cars were from California. 

Shawme Forest. About six miles of road were brushed out and cut back 
on either side from five to ten feet, and the main road into the camp was 
widened and graded with gravel. A three-car garage was constructed and 
a gasoline pump installed in it to supply water to the camp. A tractor 
was added to the forest equipment and during the summer a start was 
made on the construction of a plowed fire line. Eighty thousand three-year 
Austrian pines were set in land south of the camp. A telephone line was 
put into the camp from the state road a distance of 1,200 feet. 

Ashburnham Forest. A large amount of release cutting has been done 
on this forest to liberate the young planted and natural pines. Pine slash 
was piled and burned at dangerous points. During the spring 20,000 
Scotch pine were set on the Lashua lot and in the fall 20,000 more were set 
on the Hawkins land. During the summer months the crew were occupied 
in blister rust work and pulled more than 300,000 "ribes" plants on 500 
acres. In the fall a small camp was built to house the men and thus save 
transporting the crew back and forth from the village. 

Wendell Forest. The pine grove on the Ross land was thinned out and 
slash burned. Thirty-five thousand white pine were planted in the spring 
and 26,000 more in the fall. A small camp was built to house the men 
and the roadside brush on six miles was mowed out. Cordwood to the 
value of SI 30 was cut and sold. 

Erving Forest. About 20 acres of hardwood growth was thinned out dur- 
ing the winter and in the spring 81,000 Scotch pines were set in the fieldj 
while 94,000 seedlings were transplanted into the nursery on the state roadi 
The road into Laurel Lake was made passable for auto traffic by removing 
rocks and building two culverts. Four miles of road were brushed and 
cleared. A start was made in clearing up and repairing the buildings 
recently purchased on the Kurtz land. The forest was scouted for "ribes" 
and only 100 bushes were found. 

Mount Grace Forest. Some scattered chestnuts which were not taken by 
the timber operators when the chestnut growth was sold two years ago were 
cut and put into ties and posts. Trails to the summit were cleared and ten 
water holes dug for fire protection. During the summer the forest and 
adjoining land was cleared of "ribes," and strange to say, only 1,200 bushes 
were found, although territory to the east is thickly studded with wild 
currants. 

Otter River Forest. During the winter the fine natural pine growth on 
the Bagley lot was improved by the removal of inferior hardwoods yielding 
$250 worth of cordwood. In the spring 14,000 Scotch pine were set in the 
field and 590,000 seedlings of various species were set in the nursery. Dur- 



P. D. 73 * 13 

ing the summer the crew examined some of the swamps and lowlands for 
blister rust infestation, and pulled out 18,000 currants and gooseberries. 
Some work was done in grading and brushing roads and water holes were 
dug for use in fighting fires. The outside of the barn was boarded and 
painted. 

October Mountain Forest. Five miles of new road were brushed out and 
20 miles of old road were mowed. Hay on 130 acres of land was mowed 
largely by farmers who received the hay for the cutting. Six buildings, 
including the large barn, were painted and three of them were shingled and 
received other repairs. Grading of the main road continued with the 
use of 350 loads of cinders and 350 of gravel. Nine bridges were either 
rebuilt or strengthened. Three hundred and fifty-eight thousand spruce 
were planted in the field and 400,000 two-year-old seedlings were trans- 
planted into the nursery. Two sets of old buildings were burned down to 
get them out of the way. 

Swann Forest. Two miles of road were cleared of side brush and one- 
quarter mile repaired by grading with cinders and gravel. Part of the 
horse barn was shingled and minor repairs made inside the farmhouse and 
other buildings. About 33^ acres of advanced growth hardwood were 
thinned and the remaining chestnut on the forest sold to an operator who 
has cut 4,500 ties. Planting was confined to 1,500 white pines and 45,000 
spruce seedlings were set in the nursery. 

Beartown Forest. Pine slash along miles of wood road was piled 
and burned. Fifty thousand four-year spruce were planted in old pastures 
during the spring and 27,000 more in the fall. 

Myles Standish Forest. Brush was mowed on both sides of 18 miles of 
forest road and new roads constructed around Fearing and College Ponds 
to accommodate the campers about these. Two toilets were built on the 
public camp grounds at College Pond and several new private camps have 
been built. There were 146,000 Austrian pines set out during the spring 
and 375,000 seedling, put into the nursery. The barn was repainted and a 
new foundation put in on the west side. In spite of the dry season no fires 
occurred on the forest, but the reservation crew gave material assistance 
in fighting two fires in the vicinity. Deer continue to cause damage to the 
plantations and nursery. 

Granville-Tolland Forest. Roadside brush on main highways was mowed 
and burned and 60 acres of grass land mowed over. Four old buildings 
were torn down and removed. Thirty thousand Scotch and 10,000 Austrian 
pines were planted during the spring. A fire in slash on land adjoining the 
state forest in July threatened the forest, but was extinguished by the district 
firewarden and crew with the aid of a power pump. 

At the Tolland Mountain section a new trail was constructed from the fire 
tower to the lake. Main trail to tower was brushed out and telephone line re- 
paired. Some of the more dangerous slash areas were burned over. During 
the summer a pine blister rust crew examined the area for "ribes" and found 
the bushes in great abundance, removing 257,000 plants on 650 acres. 

Sandisfield Forest. Work on this forest was confined to planting and 
65,000 trees were set out on it in the spring. 

Harold Parker Forest. Two acres on this forest of about 10 acres each, 
which were burned over in 1922, were cleared off, the trees cut into cord- 
wood and the brush burned, and in the spring these areas were planted. 
Slash was piled and burned on a cut-over lot recently purchased. Two 
new forest roads were opened up and roadside brush cleared on 73^ miles of 
older road. Planting consisted of setting in 35,000 Scotch and white pine 
and spruce transplants in spring and 4,000 more during the fall. A release 
cutting was made in a six-year-old plantation and in an old pasture stocked 
with natural pine reproduction. 



i 



14 



P. D. 73 



Area of the State Forests, November 30, 1924 



Name of Forest 
Arthur Warton Swarm 
Ashburnham . 
Bash Bish 
Beartown 
Blandford 
Clarksburg 
Colrain 
Conway . 
Erving 

Harold Parker 
Hawley 

Hubbardston . 
Leominster 
Mohawk Trail 
Monroe . 
Mount Grace . 
Myles Standish 
Northfield 
Oakham . 
October Mountain 
Otis . 
Otter River 
Peru . 
Petersham 
Pittsfield . 
Sandisfield 
Savoy Mountain 
Shawme . 
Shutesbury 
Spencer . 
Sutton 
Templeton 
Tolland-Granville 
Wendell . 
Westminster . 
Windsor . 
Worthington . 
Unassigned lots 



Acreage 

986.75 

958.075 
. 390.08 
6,847.1 
1,419.5 
1,320. 
1,194.194 
1,260.12 
4,340.065 
1,327.6 
1,523. 

695.5 

637.7 
5,133.1 
1,593. 
1,612.525 
8,124.1875 

235.4875 

420.05 
13,318.8 
1,131.8 
1,724.21 
1,060. 

248.15 
1,082.54 
2,229.7 
6,639.9 
2,538.14 

459. 

274. 

209.5615 
86.76 
3,377. 
3,852.07 

250.95 

822.25 

225. 
1,436.035 



81,043.9005 

Report of the State Fire Warden 
Mr. William A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with the provisions of section 28, chapter 48 of 
the General Laws, I submit herewith a report of the work accomplished 
by this branch of the division during the year just ended. 

Obviously the success which attends our efforts to control forest fires is 
to a large extent dependent upon the character of the season. 

According to the records of the weather bureau, the year 1924 was marked 
by less rainfall in the months of October and November than any other for 
forty years. The drought in the spring, however, was less severe than 
during the fall season, but from October 8 to November 23, a period of 
forty-five days, there was no rainfall whatever. This condition resulted 
in our having more than 900 fires reported to this office during this period. 
The prompt discovery of these fires by the observation men in the lookout 
towers supplemented by the activity of the district forest wardens and 
town forest wardens made it possible to confine the acreage burned over 
to small areas with financial losses correspondingly low. This was true of 
all fires except in a few instances. 



P. D. 73 15 

During this time the Governor invoked the law which gives him authority 
to suspend by proclamation the hunting season. While this was disappoint- 
ing to many sportsmen, it is a pleasure- to recognize the commendable spirit 
displayed by the fraternity as a whole whose co-operation was deeply 
appreciated. 

We have had an opportunity this year of giving the power gasoline pump 
a thorough tryout and it certainly has proved its usefulness. These pumps 
will handle from 1,000 to 1,500 feet of small hose and discharge from twenty 
to^twenty-five gallons of water per minute, which is sufficient for forest fire 
work. These pumps were a part of the equipment distributed among our 
district wardens and were stationed at Carver, Westboro, Winchendon and 
Westfield. I am in hopes that our appropriations may be sufficient. to 
purchase additional pumps this coming year for use on our state forests. 

During the year a total of over 40,000 permits were issued under the 
so-called permit law. These permits are issued by the forest wardens and 
chiefs of the fire departments and are only to be used under the most favor- 
able conditions. Several times during the season conditions were such 
as to cause the Commissioner to deem it wise to stop their issuance and 
orders were issued to the forest wardens accordingly. There were 146 vio- 
lations of the permit law. Of these, 38 violators were prosecuted and fined, 
and 108 others paid for the cost of extinguishing the fires. 

Again I would call attention to the danger which attends the operation 
of portable saw mills. The most rigid care must be taken in having proper 
spark arresters installed, the removal to a safe distance from the mill of all 
slash and other debris, as well as compliance with the law relative to the 
removal of slash following cutting operations. When we consider that 
268 portable mills were in operation during the year, the value of the laws 
enacted during the past few years relative to the operation of these mills 
is evidenced by the small number of fires, originating from this source. 

I wish to express my grateful appreciation of the valuable aid rendered by 
the State Police, not only in assisting in the work of extinguishing fires, but 
in the enforcement of the fire permit and slash law. Inasmuch as this patrol 
force is to be increased in the near future, I look with pleasurable anticipa- 
tion to still greater aid from this valuable branch of the public service. 

During the months of January and February forest fire conferences were 
held in Middleboro, Boston, Taunton, Barnstable, Fitchburg, Worcester, 
Springfield, Pittsfield and Greenfield. At these meetings, in addition to 
the forest wardens, selectmen, State Police and railroad employees, there 
were present representatives of forestry departments of New York, Con- 
necticut and New Hampshire. These meetings were well attended and are 
of very great value inasmuch as they give an opportunity for an interchange 
of opinions with respect to methods of controlling forest fires by those who 
have had wide experience in this work. 

A new forest fire observation station was established on Prospect Hill in 
the town of Andover, where a 58-foot steel tower was erected. This tower 
will give protection not only to adjoining towns, but to the Harold Parker 
State Forest of over 1,700 acres. The towns of Andover, Middleton, North 
Reading and Wilmington contributed $700 to the cost of the tower. 

The small tower on Steerage Rock in the town of Brimfield was replaced 
by a large 68-foot steel tower. 

Extensive repairs were made on the Georgetown tower and minor repairs 
were made on the Kingston, Middleboro, Hingham and Falmouth towers. 

A decided improvement has been made in the railroad fire situation this 
year. The percentage of railroad fires has been reduced over 10 per cent, 
with a total damage of less than $24,000 and an expense to extinguish of 
$12,177. This has evidently been brought about by their increased care 
in front end screens and ash pans, and by the cleaning up of rights of way 
and inflammable territory adjoining. 

Owing to our limited appropriation for forest fire work, it was necessary 
that an additional appropriation of $5,000 be made by the Governor and 
Council in order that our observation stations could be maintained through 
the late fall drought. 



16 P. D. 73 

Over 8,000 forest fire warnings were posted along the highways, trails 
and public camping places calling attention to the importance of care in 
discarding lighted matches, cigarettes, cigars and pipe ashes. 

Co-operative work between this department and the Federal Government 
under the Weeks Law has been continued, and in compliance with the law 
a Federal Forestry Fund has been established made up of contributions 
from the United States Government for the purpose of assisting the state 
in protecting its forests from fire. 

I do not feel that this report would be complete without saying a word 
here about the splendid spirit shown by my assistants, the district fire 
wardens. They are constant in attendance at the fires in their districts, 
often being absent from home day and night, sometimes obliged to snatch 
such rest as they can get by sleeping out on the ground. They are in con- 
stant danger, a very serious accident happening to one of them last spring, 
as a result of which he nearly lost his sight. There is no reward for such 
service as this, the men simply doing it as a matter of duty. But at least 
the public should know that such service is being given. 

The following tables show comparative damages, costs, etc., for the past 
three years. Respectfully submitted, 

M. C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden. 



Comparative Damages by Forest Fires for the Past Three Years 

Average Average 

Year Number Acreage Cost to Damage Acreage Damage 

of Fires burned extinguish per Fire per Fire 

1922 . . 4,099 85,241 $101,714 $501,648 20.79 

1923 . . 2,672 48,602 51,448 161,043 18.18 

1924 . . 3,735 47,522 85,477 189,018 12.72 



Types of Classified Damages 

1923 



Standing trees 

Logs, lumber, cordwood 

Buildings 

Bridges, fences 

Sproutland 

Miscellaneous . 



$83,019 00 
43,244 00 
16,317 00 

397 00 
17,761 00 

305 00 



1924 
.11,712 
43,191 
15,813 

1,937 
16,235 
130 



Totals $161,043 00 $189,018 00 

Types of Land Burned Over (Acres) 

1923 1924 

Timber 1,235 3,571 

Second growth 6,970 9,450 

Second growth, not merchantable . . 17,124 12,522 

Brush land 19,802 16,144 I 

Grass land 3,471 5,835 



Totals 



48,602 



47,522 



B. D. 73 17 

Forest Fires of 1924 

Cost to 



Months 


Number 


Acres 


Extinguish 


Damage 


1923 












December 


48 


209 


5350 00 


$315 


00 


1924 












January . 


135 


348 


846 00 


663 


00 


February . 


29 


249 


253 00 


95 


00 


March 


127 


1,129 


1,383 00 


1,743 


00 


April 


. 1,158 


16,804 


17,546 00 


62,007 


00 


May . 


603 


8,893 


11,906 00 


50,102 


00 


June . 


183 


615 


2,253 00 




nn 
uu 




423 


2,518 


14 006 00 


16,858 


00 


August 


110 


413 


3,310 00 


2,176 


00 


September 


17 


17 


105 00 


46 


00 


October . 


. 396 


9,112 


16,500 00 


20,819 


00 


November 


506 


7,215 


17,019 00 


29,853 


00 


Totals 


. 3,735 


47,522 


$85,477 00 


$189,018 


00 



Classified Causes of Forest Fires, 1922-1924 





1922 


1923 


1924 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Railroad 


1,511 


36.86 


1,006 


37.65 


997 


26.69 


Lumbering 


4 


.09 


4 


.15 


4 


.10 


Brush burning .... 


545 


13.99 


241 


9.02 


441 


11.81 


Campers . . 


30 


.07 


49 


1.84 


17 


.46 


Incendiary 


131 


3.19 


58 


2.17 


86 


2.30 


Miscellaneous .... 


952 


23.21 


750 


28.07 


1,306 


34.97 


Unknown 


926 


22.59 


564 


21.10 


884 


23.67 


Totals 


4,099 


100.00 


2,672 


100.00 


3,735 


100.00 



Railroad Fires of 1924 







Number 


Number 


Acreage 


Cost to 




Railroad 


Mileage 


of Loco- 


of Fires 


burned 


Extinguish 


Damage 






motives 










New York, New Haven & Hart- 














ford 


1,883 


922 


720 


5,160 


$8,465 


$15,393 


Boston & Albany 


979 


354 


83 


224 


775 


552 


Boston & Maine .... 


2,017 


1,025 


163 


587 


1,998 


7,063 


Central Vermont .... 


71 


23 


25 


67 


355 


313 


H. T. and W 


8 


7 


6 


540 


584 


637 


Totals 


4,958 


2,331 


997 


6,578 


$12,177 


523,958 



Report of the Superintendent of Moth Work 
In regard to this particularly important branch of our work, I have the 
following report to make. With a few exceptions there was practically no 
defoliation of woodland by the gypsy moth. One of these exceptions, 
however, is worthy of notice, a large tract of 75 to 100 acres on the Taunton- 
Rehoboth line, where the trees were stripped of leaves as bare as ever in 
any season since the depredations of the gypsy moth were first noted here 
in Massachusetts. 

The reports which are required to be made of the year's work by each 
division superintendent, show that the conditions in almost every town 
are good, as regards the gypsy moth infestation. A few towns where the 
local superintendent is inefficient and the town officials and residents do not 
co-operate, show bad conditions. The brown-tail moth shows each year 
in certain towns a considerable number of fall webs, but tins condition is 
easily met by thorough work in cutting off and burning. 



18 P. D. 73 

Should this thorough work be omitted, the next season would show a 
disastrous number of brown-tail caterpillars to transform into moths and 
fly and be carried on the wind broadcast over the state. 

This encouraging report, however, should not have the effect of creating 
a feeling of security, that would lead us to contemplate a cessation of our 
efforts to combat the gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth. It was noticed 
last season that such caterpillars as were observed during the spraying: 
season were exceptionally large and healthy, and the egg clusters found in 
the fall work of creosoting were very large. Experiments in the past have 
shown these large healthy egg clusters to sometimes hatch between 400 and 
500 caterpillars. It cannot be hoped that all such clusters have been 
found, as the habit of the gypsy moth is to lay egg clusters in most con- 
cealed spots. Economic entomologists agree that when an insect becomes 
scarce, it is the proper time to take precautions, as fewer insects enjoy better 
feeding grounds, and gather strength to multiply, nature always taking 
means to prevent extinction of the species. I believe it would be false 
economy, therefore, to relax our efforts now and endanger the future. 

The towns in the western part of the state, with the exception of Berkshire 
County, which the United States Government cares for, are being thoroughly 
scouted by this department, and so far more egg clusters have been found 
than in previous years. 

Work in the North Shore woodlands has been continued, through the co- 
operation of Col. W. D. Sohier and his committee, and the usual work of 
creosoting, followed by spraying, has been done. 

A statement showing our indebtedness to the North Shore Committee 
is herewith given. 

Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 
North Shore Work 



Balance on hand December 1, 1923 $3,283 12 

Receipts 

Wm. D. Sohier, Agent $221 16 

Massachusetts Highway Division .... 6 37 

Massachusetts Highwav Division .... 73 32 

Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Forester 1,000 00 

Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 1,000 00 

Town of Manchester 500 00 

City of Beverly . 500 00 

Massachusetts Highway Division .... 202 46 

J. D. Barnes 12 50 

Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Forester 115 27 

Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 338 63 3,969 71 



$7,252 83 

Expenditures 

Pay roll $4,265 44 

Travel 18 61 

Stationery and postage 2 62 

Telephone 49 10 

Supplies 1,780 54 

Rent 280 00 

Sundries 27 17 6,423 48 



Balance on hand December 1, 1924 $829.35 



The work of breeding and disseminating parasites of the gypsy moth and 
the brown-tail moth under the control of the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture has been of help, and we give here a report of the work of the past year, 
by A. F. Burgess, in charge of the laboratory at Melrose. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George A. Smith, Superintendent of Moth Work. 



P. D. 73 19 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts 

By A. F. Burgess 
Berkshire County, Massachusetts, is included in the barrier zone which 
I has been established to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth to the west- 
ward. Work carried on by the Bureau of Entomology in this county dur- 
ing the fall of 1923 and spring of 1924 resulted in locating 90 gypsy moth 
infestations. The egg clusters were treated and the localities thoroughly 
sprayed during the spring. Although only a part of the scouting has been 
completed up to January, 1925, the infestation is not quite as heavy as it 
was last year. 

The inspection of nursery stock, forest and quarry products has been 
continued throughout the year and all of this material that is shipped from 
Massachusetts to other states requires Federal inspection. The volume of 
this product has been about normal during the past year except that a 
heavy increase has resulted from shipment of Christmas trees and greens 
and boughs of coniferous trees that are used for decorations and for other 
purposes. Large quantities of the latter material have been shipped out 
of the territory during the fall of 1924, which has required an unusual amount 
of inspection work. 

The work at the Gypsy Moth Laboratory has been continued throughout 
the year and three assistants spent the summer of 1924 in Europe and 
northern Africa in order to secure information concerning the status of the 
gypsy moth in its native home and to collect and ship parasites to this 
country. Messrs. S. S. Crossman. R. T. Webber and S. N. Dohanian car- 
ried on this work abroad in a very satisfactory manner. A substantial num- 
ber of shipments of parasites were received, most of which were Tachinid. 
The greater part of the shipments arrived at the Laboratory in good condi- 
tion. As a result of the shipments that were received from Europe during 
the previous year, it was possible to liberate several colonies in the infested 
territory in Massachusetts as well as in other states. 

Investigations that have been carried on during the past three or four 
years to secure an effective material to use as an adhesive in arsenate of lead 
sprays have developed the fact that the drying oils, particularly linseed oil 
and fish oil are very efficient for this purpose. The use of either at the rate 
of one quart to one hundred gallons of arsenate of lead solution causes the 
poison to adhere rigidly to the foliage. When this proportion is used, the 
poison sticks to foliage such as white oak and poplar, which is very difficult 
to spray. Very little is removed by heavy rains. The results of these 
experiments should make gypsy moth spraying much more effective than 
heretofore. The results with fish oil were nearly as good as with those with 
linseed oil, but the former is recommended as the price per gallon is less. 

Work on the experimental plots which has been continued for the last ten 
years or more has resulted in the accumulation of a large amount of data 
relative to the effect of defoliation in different degrees on different species 
of trees. This information is being brought together for publication. 

Sample collections of egg clusters and of caterpillars of the gypsy moth 
made in different localities throughout the infested region indicate that the 
percentage of parasitism is considerably less this year than for the past two 
or three years. The severity of infestation has been greatly reduced during 
the last few years and only a small amount of defoliation occurred in Massa- 
chusetts during the summer of 1924. Investigations made in many towns 
indicate that there is a very light, though scattered infestation throughout 
most of the infested area. Whether the decrease in the rate of parasitism 
will permit the gypsy moth to become abundant and destructive within the 
next few years cannot be predicted at this time. The situation is being 
watched, however, and carefully checked, as it is probable if the percentage 
of parasitism continues to decrease, serious gypsy moth outbreaks may 
result. 

The brown-tail moth is well under control at the present time, although 
in some localities webs are more abundant than previous years. Parasitism 
of this insect has been somewhat reduced. 



20 



n 



APPENDIX 
Financial Statement 
Receipts and Expenditures for Year ending November 30, 192 % 



P. D. 7: 



Purpose of Appropriation 



Salary of Commissioner . 
Personal Service .... 
Expenses of Commissioner 
Office Incidentals .... 
General Forestry and Nurseries 
Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands 
Prevention of Forest Fires 
Federal Forestry Fund . 
Protection against Forest Fires 
Reimbursement for Fighting Fires 
Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-tad 

■ft Moths 

Maintenance of Forests . 
Purchase and Development of State 

Forests ... . 
Maintenance of Mount Grace 
Maintenance of Standish Monument . 
Repair of Approach to Standish Monu 

V ment 

Repair of Standish Monument 



I Amount 


Refunds 

and 
Balances 

1 


Expendi- 
tures 


Balance 
to 1924 


Balance t( 
Treasury 


$6,000 
10,600 
250 
5,500 
1 12,000 
10,000 
54,800 

1,000 
1,000 


- 

30 07 

5,026 11 
8,071 96 


$6,000.00 
10,171 50 
214 61 
3,497 67 
11,982 60 
9,322 41 
58,799 95 
7,943 29 
999 07 
705 19 


- 
— 

128 67 


_ 

428 50 
35 39 
2,032 40 
17 40 

26 16 
294 81 


130,000 
25,000 


46,046 99 


129,698 42 
24,977 42 


46,348 57 


22 58 


100,000 
1,000 
1,500 


105,740 38 


204,767 18 
990 48 
1,456 78 


973 20 


9.52 
43 22 


2,286 
2,500 


157 95* 


2,443 95 


2,500 00 




£362,436 


$165,073 46 


$473,950 52 


$49,950 44 


$3,608 50 



* Amount paid by comptroller from appropriation for small items 



Receipts 

For lumber sold 

For cord wood sold 

For sale and rent of buildings, etc. 

For hay 

For rent of camp sites .... 

For trees sold 

For books, cards, maps, etc. . 

For redemption of lots .... 

For sale of products from reforestation lots 

For examinations 

For supplies for gypsy moth work . 
For donations to North Shore Fund 
For private work on North Shore . 
For highway work ... 
For sales of discarded equipment . 
For supplies for fire fighting . 



$1,277 16 
736 50 
411 14 
348 85 
579 00 
10,795 44 
19 71 
3,025 32 
661 25 
67 98 
22,148 59 
2,000 00 
568 79 
1,276 19 
162 50 
2,914 30 



$46,992 72 



P. D. 73 21 
Statement of Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1924 



State Forest 


Planting 

and 
Nurseries 


General 
Upkeep, 
Fire lines, 
Roads 


Surveying, 
Titles, etc. 


Land 


Total 


Receipts 


Arthur Warton Swann . 


$396 40 


$638 07 


— 


— 


$1,034 


47 


$909 15 


Ashburnham . 


461 58 


2,982 91 


$659 92 


$1,828 95 


5,933 


36 


15 00 


Bash Bish 


— 


— 


4 00 


5,254 00 


5,258 


00 


— 


Beartown .... 


633 00 


— 


376 42 


1,828 50 


2,837 


92 


53 34 


Blandford 


- 


— 


157 07 


7,383 37 


7,540 


44 


— 


Clarksburg 


— 


- 


207 75 


2,000 00 


2,207 


75 


— - 


■Colrain .... 


1,512 00 


702 00 


143 85 


750 00 


3,107 


85 


- 


•Conway .... 


— 


— 


3 85 


712 87 


716 


72 


35 00 


Erving .... 


1,664 50 


3,832 67 


973 92 


4,478 76 


10,949 


85 


33 60 


Harold Parker . 


309 46 


2,852 98 


167 49 


— 


3,329 


93 


215 00 


Haw Icy .... 


— 


— 


3 32 


1,230 00 


1,233 


32 


— 


Hubbardston . 


— 


— 


14 14 


2,235 00 


2,249 


14 


— 


Leominster 


— 


— 


842 97 


561 15 


1,404 


12 


— 


Mohawk Trail . 


851 89 


1,703 76 


1,125 60 


533 00 


4,214 


25 


45 00 


Monroe .... 


— 


— 


893 49 


6,650 00 


7,543 


49 


5 00 


Mount Grace . 


73 50 


1,699 73 


290 16 


2,269 80 


4,333 


19 


10 00 


Mylcs Standish 


1,994 09 


7,436 43 


15 59 


798 37 


10,244 


48 


605 00 


Northfield 


— 


— 


230 33 


1,060 69 


1,291 


02 


— 


Oakham .... 


367 63 


15 00 


- 


- 


382 


63 


- 


October Mountain . 


3,414 12 


9,699 04 


3,677 50 


5,979 50 


22,770 


16 


379 25 


Otis 


— 


— 


3,002 57 


1,085 20 


4,087 


77 


— 


Otter River 


2,122 94 


5,112 92 


100 91 


117 30 


7,454 


07 


292 54 


Peru 


— 


— 


316 21 


5,035 00 


5,351 


21 


— 


(Petersham 


— 


- 


3 19 


992 60 


995 


79 


- 


Pittsfield .... 




— 


1,421 24 


914 75 


2,335 


99 


- 


Sandisfield 


763 28 


— 


1,126 50 


1,888 00 


3,777 


78 


86 00 


Savoy Mountain 


2,570 55 


2,088 15 


680 20 


4,302 50 


9,641 


40 


334 52 


Shawme .... 


793 50 


12,003 92 


691 45 


2,868 81 


16,357 


68 


59 75 


fsYi ii tp^Hnr v 

on uicou u,i. y • • • 






6 41 


2,242 30 


2,248 


71 




Spencer .... 


- 


- 












Sutton .... 






58 24 


992 75 


1,050 


99 


- 


Templeton 








433 80 


433 


80 




Tolland-Granville . 


'506 61 


3,653 82 


417 54 




4,577 


97 


65 00 


Wendell .... 


717 50 


1,639 39 


386 80 


2,218 85 


4,962 


54 


209 50 


Westminster 






61 68 


724 25 


785 


93 




Windsor .... 






872 48 


3,490 00 


4,362 


48 




Worthington . 


355 56 




89 44 




445 


00 




Unaligned Lots 








5,926 06 


5,926 


06 




Totals 


$19,508 11 


$56,060 79 


$19,022 23 


$78,786 13 


$173,377 26 


$3,352 65 



The Distribution of Supplies 

Supplies have been furnished to towns and cities for gypsy moth work as 
usual. The amounts given below do not correspond with the amount of aid 
given to the municipalities, as some towns make payment to the state for 
all or a part of the bill for supplies, according to the amount of their net 
expenditure and their class, under the provisions of section 4, chapter 132 
of the General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement and for expendi- 
tures, see table on page 23. 



List of Towns and Amounts of 



Acton 


. $1,367 


02 


Ashburnham 


342 


76 


Ashby 


424 


58 


Ashland 


254 


06 


Bedford . 


675 


55 


Berkley 


259 


77 


Berlin 


1,089 


69 


Bolton 


1,669 


53 


Boxborough 


321 


75 


Boxford 


77 


01 


Boylston . 


227 


28 


Brewster . 


287 


14 



Supplies Furnished for 


1924 




Bridgewater 


17 


92 


Burlington 


1,628 


76 


Carlisle .... 


1,787 


68 


Carver .... 


195 


00 


Dennis .... 


455 


81 


Dover .... 


363 


55 


Dracut .... 


919 


19 


Dunstable 


371 


41 


Duxbury .... 


574 


33 


East Bridgewater . 


1,665 


16 


Eastham .... 


252 


17 


Essex .... 


242 


36 



22 



Foxboro . 


649 


98 


Pembroke 


Freetown 


393 


53 


Pepperell . 


Georgetown 


931 


30 


Plainville 


Groton 


. 1,498 


13 


Ply mp ton 


Groveland 


1,371 


31 


Princeton 


Halifax 


649 


19 


Raynham . 


Hanover . 


93 


04 


Rochester 


Hanson 


395 


45 


Rowley 


Harvard . 


728 


57 


Salisbury . 


Harwich . 


642 


67 


Sandwich 


Holbrook 


324 


19 


Sherborn . 


Holden 


1,025 


48 


Shirley 


Holland 


8 


12 


Southborough 


Holliston . 


395 


59 


Sterling 


Hopkinton 


306 


49 


Stow 


Hubbardston . 


11 


86 


Sudbury 


Kingston . 


221 


65 


Tewksbury 


Lakeville . 


500 


07 


Topsfield . 


Lincoln 


415 


56 


Townsend 


Littleton . 


. 1,931 


35 


Truro 


Lunenburg 


566 


39 


Tyngsborough . 


Lynnfield 


1,391 


80 


Wayland . 


Marion 


. 1,029 


85 


WeMeet 


Marshfield 


628 


28 


Wenham . 


Mashpee . 


417 


83 


West Boylston 


Medfield . 


227 


95 


West Rridgewater 


Merrimac . 


. 1,301 


56 


West Newbury 


Middleton . 


1,372 


33 


Westborough 


Newbury . 


. 1,796 


87 


Westford . 


Norfolk 


317 


46 


Westminster 


North Reading 


783 


28 


Weston 


Northboro 


8 


10 


Wilmington 


Norton 


316 


85 


Winchendon 


Nor well 


751 


28 


Yarmouth 


Orleans 


548 


93 





Automobile supplies 

General Forestry and Nurseries 
Maintenance of Forests .... 
Special North Shore Fund 
Prevention of Forest Fires 
Purchase and Development of State Forests 
Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands 
Shop Equipment ... 
Traveling Sprayers and Highways . 



L D. 73 23 
'able showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
cities for the year 1924 





1924 


1925 


1 Cities and Towns 


Required 


Total Net 










Total 


Required 




Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Private 


Reimburse- 


Tools 


Amount 


Expendi- 




tures 


tures 


work 




ment 


supplied 


received 


tures 














from 
State 


- 


Abington 


$2,325 08 


— 


- 




— 


— 


— 


$2,325 08 


Acton 


1,088 65 


S981. 19 | 


$30 50 
*403 98 


\ 
J 




$1,367 02 


SI, 259 56 


1,088 65 


Acushnet 


1,417 76 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


1,417 76 


Adams 


6,802 69 


— 


— 






— 


— 


6,802 69 


Agawam . 


2,363 96 


— 


- 






— 


— 


2,363 96 


Alford 


110 60 


— 


- 




- 


— 


— 


110 60 


Amesbury 


4,729 57 


- 


- 






- 


- 


4,729 57 


Amherst . 


3,256 24 


- 


— 






— 


— 


3,256 24 


Andover . 


5,000 00 


— 


— 




_ 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Arlington 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 




5,000 00 


Ashburnham . 


722 80 


805 35 


70 75 




$82 55 


342 76 


425 31 


722 80 


Ashby . 


497 26 


616 18 


300 60 




118 92 


424 58 


543 50 


497 26 


Ashfield . 


458 71 


- 








- 


- 


458 71 


Ashland . 


939 80 


1,375 57 


109 00 




434 77 


254 06 


688 83 


oon on 

y<3y ou 


Athol 


4,762 04 


— 


— 






— 


- 


4,762 04 


Attleboro 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




— 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Auburn . 


1,137 48 








— 






1,137 48 


Avon 


617 94 


596 35 


80 70 




— 




: 


617 94 


Ayer 


1,347 47 


- 


- 




- 




- 


1,347 47 


Barnstable 


4,409 96 


— 


— 






_ 


— 


4,409 96 


Barre 


1,652 06 


— 


— 






— 


— 


1,652 06 


Becket 


415 93 


— 


— 




- 


— 


— 


415 93 


Bedford 


1,033 98 


1,410 *92 f 


721 01 
*102 50 


J 


376 94 


675 55 


1,052 49 


1,033 98 


Belchertown . 


533 00 












533 00 


Belhngham 


703 56 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


703 56 


Belmont . 


5,000 00 




- 






- 


- 


o.OOU UO 


Berkley . 


302 91 


328 62 


114 00 


1 
/ 


25 71 


259 77 


285 48 


302 91 


Berlin 


Q7zl 1 "i 


374 13 { 


101 97 
*54 26 




1,089 by 


l ,Uoy ow 


374 13 


Bernardston . 


320 18 












320 18 


Beverly . 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 




- 


: 


_ 


5,000 00 


Billerica . 


3,258 25 


- 


- 




— 


- 


- 


3,258 25 


Blackstone 


909 32 








— 






909 62 


Blandford 


404 68 


: 






- 


: 


: 


404 68 


Bolton 


412 60 


319 91 | 


10 00 
*197 24 


\ 
J 




1 669 53 


1 576 84 


412 60 


Boston . 


5,000 00 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Bourne 


2,660 78 


— 

46 41 ^ 
485 33 


— 




— 


- 


— 


2,660 78 


Boxoorou^fi 


145 16 


1 00 
*247 96 


} 






— — O uu 


145 16 


Boxford . 


461 11 


164 52 


} 


24 22 


77 01 


101 23 


461 11 


Boylston. • • 


292 15 


392 37 | 


232 91 
*29 52 


100 22 


227 28 


327 50 


292 15 


Braintree 


5,000 00 






_ 






5,000 00 


Brewster 


478 20 


672 01 | 


462 45 
*88 20 


\ 
f 


193 81 


9R7 1 X 

iOl 1-t 


480 95 


478 20 


Bridgewater . 


2,331 21 






_ 


17 92 




r\ oil oi 

2,331 21 


Brimfield 


451 91 




- 




- 




_ 


451 91 


Brockton 


5,000 00 


— 


- 




_ 


— 


- 


5,000 00 


Brookfield 


521 70 


286 50 


50 90 




_ 


— 


— 


521 70 


BrookUne 


5,000 00 


— 


— 




_ 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Buckland 


1,078 41 


— 


— 




_ 


- 


- 


1,078 41 


Burlington 


614 51 


434 60 


229 55 




_ 


1,628 76 


1,448 85 


614 51 


Cambridge 


5,000 00 


— 


— 






— 


— 


5,000 00 


Canton 


3,288 10 


— 


— 




_ 


— 


— 


3,288 10 


Carlisle 


253 49 


8^0 22 / 


276 99 
*105 00 


596 73 


1 7C7 fiQ 
1,<o4 DO 


2 384 41 


253 49 


Ca 

rver 


935 98 


242 20 J 
143 60 


422 94 
*608 38 


j 




195 00 




Q8 


Charleraont . 


374 68 










_ 


374 68 


Charlton 


826 29 














826 29 


Chatham 


1,350 40 














1,350 40 


Chelmsford 


2,857 90 














o ae;7 on 


Chelsea . 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Cheshire . 


509 13 














509 13 


Chester . 


508 08 














508 08 


Chesterheld . 


195 48 


132 00 












195 48 


Chicopee 


5,000 00 












_ 


5,000 00 


Chilmark 


192 34 


- 








: 




192 34 


Clarksburg 


361 75 










_ 




361 75 



* Lead sold. 



24 



P. D. 73 





1924 


1925 


Cities and Towns 


















1 

Total 








Required 


Total Net 


Private 


Reimburse- 


Tools 


Amount 


Required 




Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Work 


ment 


supplied 


received 


Expendi- 




tuie 




tures 












from 


tures 




















State \ 






Clinton . 


$5,000 


00 


_ 






V. ' ; 






_ 


$5,000 


00 


Cohasset 


2,903 


15 


_ 






' .1 "; 






_ 


2,903 


15 


Colrain . 


710 


74 


_ 






_ 






_ 


710 


74 


Concord . 


3,239 


50 


_ 






_ 






_ 


3,239 


50 


Conway . 


437 


26 


$206 13 


$51 


50 


- 






- 


437 


26 


Cummington . 


194 


10 


- 












- 


194 


10 


Dalton . 


2,381 


29 
















2 381 


29 


Dana 


264 


59 


299 68 


76 


62 


$35 09 






$35 09 


264 


59 


Danvers . 


4,056 


57 










- 






4,056 


57 


Dartmouth 


3,465 


13 


_ 






_ 






- 


3,465 


13 


Dedham . 


5,000 


00 


_ 






_ 








5^000 


00 


Deerfield 


1^945 


26 


_ 






_ 






_ 


1945 


26 


Dennis 


712 


60 


935 80 ( 


228 
*11 


75 
60 


} 223 20 


$455 


81 


679 01 


712 


60 


Dighton . 


1,485 


43 














_ 


1,485 


43 


Douglas . 


852 


51 


• _ 












_ 


852 


51 


Dover 


1,367 


51 


1,140 04 


191 


40 




363 


55 


136 08 


1,367 


51 


Dracut . 


L539 


22 


2,210 36 


679 


74 


671 14 


191 


1 9 


1,590 33 


1,539 


22 


Dudley . 


1,728 


31 
















1,728 


31 


Dunstable 


280 


85 


f 

314 29 < 


259 
*53 


95 
02 


) 


33 44 


371 


41 


404 85 


280 


85 


Duxbury 


1,767 


68 


2,185 99 


1,385 


17 




422 31 


574 


33 


996 64 


1,767 


68 


E. Bridgewater 


1^891 


67 


1,563 24 


1,171 


25 




1 665 


16 


1,336 73 


1,89 1 


67 


E. Brookfield 


364 


50 
















364 


50 


E. Longmeadow . 


891 


40 


_ 












_ 


891 


40 


Eastnam 


281 


24 


399 49 


304 


70 


118 21 


252 


17 


370 38 


281 


24 


Easthampton 


5,000 


00 
















5,000 


00 


Easton . 


2 395 


90 


**133 00 












_ 


2|395 


90 


Edgartown 


793 


36 














_ 


793 


36 


Egremont 


386 


10 


_ 












_ 


386 


10 


Enfield . 


337 


34 


_ 












_ 


337 


34 


Erving . 


946 


93 


_ 












_ 


946 


93 


Essex 


622 


21 


349 57 


398 


00 




242 


36 




622 


21 


Everett . 


5,000 


00 














_ 


5,000 


00 


Fairhaven 


3',683 


45 


_ 












_ 


3 683 


45 


Fall River 




nn 
uu 


_ 












_ 


i 5,000 


00 


Falmouth 


4,684 


60 


_ 












_ 


4,684 


60 


Fitchburg 


5^000 


00 


_ 












_ 


5,000 


00 


Florida . 


595 


13 
















595 


13 


Foxborough . 


1,515 


62 


1,813 91 


250 


00 


284 00 


649 


98 


933 98 


i 1,515 


62 


Framingham . 


5 000 


00 
















■ 5,000 


00 


Franklin . 


3'037 


42 


_ 












_ 


3,037 


42 


Freetown 


648 


38 


709 76 


150 


95 


61 38 


393 


53 


454 91 


648 


38 


Gardner . 


5,000 


00 
















5,000 


00 


Gay Head 


28 


57 


_ 












_ 


28 


57 


Georgetown . 


639 


00 


f 

672 16 < 


565 
*9 


80 
80 


} 33 16 


931 


30 


964 46 


639 


00 


Gill .... 


321 


24 


_ 












_ 


321 


24 


Gloucester 


5,000 


00 


_ 












_ 


5,000 


uu 


Goshen . 


144 


79 


_ 












_ 


144 


79 


Gosnold . 


421 


63 


- 












- 


421 


63 


Grafton . 


2,635 


47 
















Z,DoO 


'it 


Granby . 


466 


38 
















466 


38 


Granville 


304 


31 


47 73 














304 


31 


Great Barrington . 


4,307 


32 














- 


4,307 


32 


Greenfield 


5i000 


00 


- 












- 


5,000 


00 


Greenwich 


241 


40 
















241 


40 


Groton . 


1,441 


03 


r 

1,993 23 < 


502 
*68 


82 
00 




552 20 


1,498 


13 


2,050 33 


1,441 


03 


Groveland 


685 


05 


743 70 


304 
*94 


80 
40 




58 65 


1,371 


31 


1 429 96 


685 


05 


Hadley . 


1,272 


33 
















$1,272 


33 


Halifax . 


388 


14 


257 60 f 


1 208 
'*25 


15 
00 


} I 


649 


19 


518 65 


388 


14 


Hamilton 


2,007 


19 
















2 007 


19 


Hampden 


221 


79 


- 












- 


221 


79 


Hancock 


192 


99 


















192 


99 


Hanover 


1,089 


89 


1,347 89 { 


*474 
36 


75 
00 




230 25 


no 


U-l 


323 29 


1,089 


89 


Hanson 


905 


13 


} 

941 44 i 


318 

*35 


63 
00 




36 31 


395 


45 


431 76 


905 


13 


Hard wick 


1,496 


87 


436 50 


148 


50 










- 


1 1,496 


87 


Harvard 


867 


47 


799 75 | 


21 
*330 


50 
03 




1 


728 


57 


660 85 


867 


47 


Harwich . 


1,034 


01 


1,037 32 | 


950 
*106 


77 
02 






642 


67 


642 67 


j 1,034 


01 


Hatfield . 


1,230 


41 


















' 1,230 


41 


Haverhill 


5,000 


00 
















: 5,000 


00 



* Lead sold. 



** Payroll financed by State. 



D. 73 



25 



Cities and Towns 



Lunenburg 
Lynn 
Lynnfield 
Maiden . 
Manchester 
Mansfield 
Marblehead 
Marion 
Marlborough 
Marshfield 
Mashpee 
Mattapoisett 
Maynard 

Medfield 

Medford . 
Medway . 
Melrose . 
Mendon . 
Merrimac 
Methuen 
Middleborough 
Middlefield 
Middleton 
Milford . 
Millbury 
Millis 
Millville . 
Milton 
Monroe . 
Monson . 
Montague 
Monterey 
Montgomery . 
Mount Washington 
Nahant . 



1924 



Required | Total Net 
Expendi Expendi- 
tures tures 



$124 53 
181 25 
3,914 81 
385-98 
1,013 63 

1,163 84 
82 38 

1,162 28 

5,000 00 
3,349 33 

903 27 

451 04 
2,929 63 
5,000 00 

500 68 
2,871 41 

869 45 

567 38 

1,518 84 
407 78 
5,000 00 
2,311 81 
1,679 19 
3,079 43 
5,000 00 
225 90 
4,395 32 
141 11 
927 85 

690 16 

2,367 34 
5,000 00 
3,747 71 

761 84 

5,000 00 
869 87 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
2,837 24 
5,000 00 
1,486 54 
5.000 00 

1,354 29 

242 70 
947 30 
2,527 51 

964 20 

5,000 00 
1,101 94 
5,000 00 
376 02 
800 97 
5,000 00 
2,936 92 
140 94 
481 36 
5,000 00 
2,189 15 
1,038 34 
668 31 
5,000 00 
239 14 
1,079 54 
4,574 48 
232 76 
100 35 
90 27 
2.091 84 



$1,115 97 
1,016 89 

101 18 

966 16 

456 85 
765 68 

431 50 

1,025 63 
744 41 



270 85 
95 97 



618 10 
1,296 51 



1,426 27 



1,347 57 
1,475 73 



729 47 



943 50 



347 69 



Private 
Work 



$315 00 
671 00 
*52 02 

66 07 

278 20 
*58 05 



174 75 
*144 54 
85 90 



336 80 
205 60 
*136 20 



Reimburse- 



4 55 



23 25 
*599 44 



466 90 
♦304 72 



675 85 



483 25 

1,753 50 
*182 97 
413 90 



342 15 
*20 00 



319 91 



311 60 



$102 34 



18 80 



314 64 



156 18 
177 03 



129 74 



Tools 
supplied 



5324 19 
1,025.48 
8 12 
395 59 



306 49 
11 86 



221 65 
500 07 



426 64 



1,233 03 



142 53 



415 56 
1,931 35 



566 39 
1,391 80 

1,029 85 

628 28 
417 83 

227 95 

1,301 56 
1,372 33 



Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 



$426 53 
878 53 

26 92 

199 47 



326 50 



377 83 
677 10 



129 74 



1,337 16 



422 65 
1,818 44 



969 58 

621 56 
,650 86 



1,444 09 



1,238 66 



1925 



Required 
Expendi- 
tures 



Lead sold. 



26 



P. D. 72 





1924 


1925 


Cities and Towns 












Total 






Required 


Total Net 


Private 


Reimburse- 


Tools 


Amount 


Required 




Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Work 


ment 


supplied 


received 


Expendi- 




tures 


tures 








from 
State 


tures 


Nantucket 


$2,472 30 


— 


- 


- 


- 


— 


$2,472 30 


Natick . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Need ham 


4,934 64 




_ 


_ 




_ 


4,934 64 


New Ashford . 


48 .34 


— 


_ 


— 


_ 


— 


48 54 


New Bedford 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


— 


5,000 00 


New Braintree 


231 64 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


231 64 


New Marlborough 


641 09 




_ 


_ 


— 


- 


641 09 


New Salem 


246 44 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


246 44 


Newbury 


1,089 o2 


i 


$S45 30 
*414 35 


} &o44 43 


Cl — oc c— 


M Oil Qfi 

?2,o41 oU 


1,089 52 


Newburyport . >, 


5,000 00 


— 


— 1 


- 


- 


— 


5,000 00 


Newton . 


5,000 00 


— 




— 




— 


- AAA AA 

O.000 00 


Norfolk . 


629 89 


828 38 


331 05 


19S 49 


317 46 


515 95 


629 89 


North Adams 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


o.OOU 00 


North Andover 


4,173 28 




— 




— 




4.173 28 


North Attleborough 


4.210 31 












4,210 31 


Nortn Brookneld . 


1,074 89 






- 






1 ,074 89 


North Reading 


6 ".5 S7 


662 40 


422 09 




783 28 


783 28 


655 87 


Northampton 


5,000 00 






- 






5,000 00 


Northborough 


889 14 


_ 




_ 


8 10 


— 


889 14 


Northbridge . 


4,949 85 






_ 


— 


— 


4,949 85 


Northfield 


760 15 


— 




- 


- 


- 


760 15 


Norton . 


936 11 


859 79 < 


115 11 

*53 10 


1 


... _ _ 
olo oo 


240 oo 


936 11 


Norwell . 


642 4< 


i oca ao 1 
1.260 9© j 

_ 


1,223 95 
*25 25 


| 618 51 


l,/ol 2o 


O o£»ft "7A 

j.ooy /y 


642 47 


Norwood 


5,000 00 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


r ArtA AA 
O.UUU UU 


Oak Bluffs 


1,226 88 


_ 




_ 


- 


— 


1,226 oo 


Oakham . 


193 67 


_ 




_ 


— 


— 


193 67 


Orange . 


2.32S 56 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,6 lb oo 


Orleans . 


69S 50 


967 20 


868 36 


268 70 


548 93 


817 63 


698 50 


Otis .... 


177 12 












177 12 


Oxford . 


1,190 82 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 1 AA CO 

1,190 ©J 




4.605 41 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


— 


4,605 41 


Paxton 


240 95 


95 99 


97 83 


— 


— 


— 


'240 95 


Peabody . 


5.000 00 


_ 


— 






— 


5,000 00 


Pelham . 


253 76 


_ 


_ 






— 


253 76 


Pembroke 


634 63 


2,286 96 


652 73 


1,632 33 


939 03 


2,571 36 


634 63 


Pepperell 


1 QiQ ^ 1 


1 9?0 KK \ 

l.ooy do \ 


83 00 
*101 80 


1 in ni 


i ton **n 

1 ,0— u OO 


l.OOU OI 


1,349 54 


Peru 


110 48 


- 


- 


- 


- 


110 48 


Petersham 


618 14 


113 00 


32 40 


- 


- 


- 


618 14 


Phillipston 


165 17 


89 60 


25 60 


- 






lOO 1 1 


Pittsfield 


5,000 00 








_ 


_ 


o.OOu UU 


.rlainstield 


124 48 


_ 


_ 


— 


- 


— 


1 04 4§ 


Plainville 


751 24 


784 41 


SS 00 


33 17 


297 74 


330 91 


751 24 


Plymouth 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 




— 


5.000 00 


Plympton 


261 37 


601 44 


209 48 


340 07 


27 S 90 


618 97 


261 37 


Prescott . 


130 99 


58 50 


99 00 


- 


- 


— 


130 99 


Princeton 


505 54 


f 

20/ I D i 


185 37 
*83 16 




o< < 06 


TO T7 

t y a 


505 54 


Provincetown 


1,683 30 


— 






— 


- 


1 £00 on 

l.boo oU 


Quincy . 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


- 


- AAA Art 

O.UUU UU 


Randolph 


1.412 96 


_ 


- 




- 


- 


1,412 96 


Raynham 


580 95 


733 22 


569 00 


152 27 


301 32 


453 59 


580 95 


Reading 


4,221 89 


— 


— 








4 OO 1 OA 

4,221 oy 


Rehoboth 


703 28 






: 


_ 


_ 


703 28 


Revere . 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


E AAA AA 

O.UUU UU 


Richmond . . 


269 50 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


269 50 


Rochester 


515 84 


1,051 47 


124 43 


535 63 


185 13 


720 76 


515 84 


Rockland 


3,103 36 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,103 36 


Rockport 


2,055 83 








— 




2,055 83 


Rowe 


142 5S 


143 45 








_ 


142 58 


Rowley . 


531 27 


1,450 33 | 


498 04 

*295 82 


) 919 26 


476 05 


1,395 31 


531 27 
508 85 


Royalston 


508 85 










- 


Russell . 


1,481 77 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




i 1,481 77 


Rutland . 


492 11 


170 70 


40 55 


— 




— 


492 11 


Salem 


5,000 00 






_ 




— 


5,000 00 


Salisbury 


1,062 69 


952 06 | 


581 51 
*41 60 


} - 


509 21 


398 58 


1,062 69 


Sandisfield 


220 So 




170 70 
*153 40 








220 85 


Sandwich 


718 47 


946 52 { 


} 228 05 


223 20 


451 25 


718 47 


&augus ... 


3.615 S3 












• 3,615 83 


Savoy 


114 40 












'll4 40 


Scituate . 


3.150 24 












3.150 24 


Seekonk . 


1,096 24 












1.096 24 



* Lead sold. 





1924 


1925 

j 


Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Total 
Expendi- 
tures 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
i Expendi- 
tures 



81,651 94 






— 




DO 1 ! Oo 










1,039 02 


- 


I 


- 


- 


813 47 


$679 15 { 


j $525 23 
*72 18 


1 _ 
J 


$491 06 


992 28 


947 59 


162 09 


— 


1,330 26 


2,069 06 










180 98 


101 50 


39 30 


- 


- 


1,245 93 


— 




- 


1 


5,000 00 




: 






2,542 59 


- 




- 


: 


329 42 


191 51 


27 50 


- 


- 


1,373 10 


928 79 


j 661 58 


— 


22 07 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


- 




629 81 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,772 59 


— 


— 


— 




5,000 00 




- 


- 




638 80 


647 06 { 


39 14 
*102 60 


1 
/ 


1,447 44 


2,433 19 




— 


- 




3,294 15 




- 


- 




2,655 28 




— 






681 68 


i 

813 94 | 


142 85 
*334 78 


i ^132 S>fi 

1 ■.!*_)— _'l 


566 09 


559 55 


721 95 


131 05 


162 40 


— 


949 06 




319 75 
*103 70 


\ 
I 


281 15 


426 06 


— 




- 


- 


942 75 


— 


- 


— 




5,000 00 




- 


- 




952 26 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1,354 47 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,270 39 


2,369 60 


643 09 


1,099 21 


1,875 80 


1,038 03 


— 


- 


— 


— 


151 22 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,196 62 


577 65 


197 74 


— 


176 05 


912 39 


983 19 


438 18 


70 80 


1,403 62 


295 94 


479 48 


149 77 


193 54 


87 83 


413 76 


925 16 


344 90 


511 40 


1,784 94 


201 43 


— 


— 


— 


— 


653 02 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,863 14 


— 


— 


— 


- 


5,000 00 










177 56 




_ 




_ 


3,875 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,271 36 


— 


— • 


_ 


— 


3,516 97 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,939 81 


- 


— 


— 


— 


235 25 


— 


— 


— 


— 


144 54 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,733 70 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 










5,000 00 


: 


_ 




_ 


424 25 


- 


- 


- 


167 63 


403 79 






- 




1,291 66 


954 71 


301 68 




1,356 71 


556 64 


438 57 


418 88 
716 15 




391 65 


895 45 


1,599 13 { 


*80 94 


} 703 68 


576 78 


570 45 


1 IT K1 


153 49 






472 22 




250 60 






561 22 { 


*100 20 


} 85 60 


373 13 


5,000 00 










400 68 










272 81 










1,659 34 








7 82 


5.000 00 










1,929 04 


1,813 66 { 


573 40 
*400 00 


} ] 


2,291 37 


149 47 


87 15 


6 25 






520 63 


572 33 { 


258 15 
*104 22 


} 51 70 


399 06 


2,585 58 








10 10 


1,984 97 











$356 74 
1,285 57 



1,447 44 



162 40 



2,975 01 



1,474 42 
281 37 
2,296 34 



1,019 76 
273 58 

1,280 46 
458 73 

z 

2,175 99 
450 76 



$1,651.94 
664 63 
1,039 02 

813 47 

992 28 
2,069 06 

180 98 
1,245 93 
5,000 00 
2,542 59 

329 42 
1,373 10 
5,000 00 

629 81 
1,772 59 
5,000 00 

638 80 
2,433 19 
3,294 15 
2,655 28 

681 68 
559 55 
949 06 
426 06 
942 75 
5,000 00 
952 26 
5,000 00 
1,354 47 

1.270 39 
1,038 03 

151 22 
1,196 62 
912 39 
295 94 
413 76 
201 43 
653 02 
2,863 14 
5,000 00 
177 56 
3,875 00 
5,000 00 

3.271 36 
3,516 97 
1,939 81 

235 25 
144 54 
5,000 00 
1,733 70 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
424 25 
403 79 
1,291 66 
556 64 

895 45 
570 45 
472 22 
5,000 00 
400 68 
272 81 
1,659 34 
5,000 00 

1,929 04 
149 47 
520 63 
2.585 58 
1,984 97 



* Lead sold. 



28 P. D. 73 





1924 


1925 
















Total 




Cities and Towns 


Required 


i otai in eu 


r nvate 


L\Bi mourse- 


1 ools 


Amount 


Required 




Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Work 


ment 


supplied 


received 


Expendi- 




tures 


tures 








from 


tures 
















State 




Westwood 


$1,241 


34 












$1,241 341 


Weymouth 


5,000 


nn 
uu 












5,000 00 


Whately 


433 


39 












433 39 


Whitman 


2,862 


98 












2,862 98' 


Wilbraham 


1,129 


34 












1,129 34i 


Williamsburg 


646 


08 












646 08 


Williamstown 


2,510 


54 












2,510 54 


Wilmington . 


1,058 


48 


«i i c ".a l a 
<a±,ojo ii 


tC07 Aft 






<59 QAQ KT 
>5Z,orty <->/ 


1,058 481 


Winchendon . 


2,565 


40 








1 00 




2,565 40^ 


Winchester 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Windsor . 


171 


37 












171 37 


Winthrop 


5,000 


00 












5,000 001 


Woburn . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00, 


Worcester 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00: 


Worthington . 


226 


15 


222 25 










226 15 


Wrentham 


877 


50 












877 501 


Yarmouth 


1,041 


58 


951 19 


156 50 




486 72 


396 33 


1,041 58j 



)925" 

Public Document ^g^No. 73 



Wbt Commontoealtf) of jWastfacfmtfette 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Commissioner of Conservation 



AND 



State Forester 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1925 
Department of Conservation 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
1,500. 2-'26. Order 4299. C 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Conservation of Forests . . . • • 3 

Conservation of Domestic Animals 4 

Conservation of Wild Life 4 

State Forests 5 

Standish Monument Reservation 6 

White Pine Blister Rust 6 

Lectures and Conventions 6 

Exhibits .• 7 

Extension Forestry 7 

Recommendations, Forestry 7 

Recommendations, Fisheries and Game 8 

Recommendations, Animal Industry 9 

Division of Forestry, Report 10 

Organization 10 

State Plantations 10 

Forest Survey 11 

Examinations 11 

Nurseries 11 

State Forests 12 

Report of State Fire Warden 14 

Report of Moth Superintendent 18 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts 19 

Appendix: Financial Statements 21 



OUTLINE OF REPORT 

This report is divided for convenience and economy into four parts: — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of Conservation. 

Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 

Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume as Public Document No. 73. 
Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 25. 
Part IV is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 98. 



Wbt Commontoealtfj of JHa**acfm*etta 

Part I 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CONSERVATION 

The Department of Conservation composed of the division of forestry, the divi- 
ion of fisheries and game and the division of animal industry, is engaged m promot- 
ig activities that are absolutely essential in assuring to the citizens of Massachusetts 
he fullest measure of health and prosperity possible of attainment The various 
,ctivities of these divisions during the past year are reported m the fullness of detail 
n other pages of this document. . 

Pursuant to the requirement of the statute under which the department was 
reated, the Commissioner and directors have met in conference and passed upon 
Jl matters of more than ordinary moment relating to the activities of the depart- 
nent. Twenty-two such meetings have been held during the year and an accurate 
,ccount of the business transacted has been recorded m the books of the department 

The annual report of this department, especially as it relates to forestry, would 
lot be complete without referring to the valuable advice and cooperation which 
us been given by Prof. Richard T. Fisher, Director of the Harvard Forest 
During the past season Professor Fisher invited the assistant foresters, district 
orest wardens and the superintendents of two state forests to a three-day meeting 
it the Harvard Forest in Petersham, where he gave them valuable information 
concerning silvicultural methods, and general information relating to scientific 
nethods of forestry. The Harvard Forest demonstrates the management of a 
ract of forest land brought to a high degree of scientific skill, and we hope that in 
;ourse of time our state forests may be in the same state of development. 

Conservation of Our Forests 

Any nation or state that would prosper continuously must conserve its natural 
•esources. Without the proper conservation of these resources, which furnish our 
-aw material, the business of modern civilization cannot be carried on. Mature 
renews much without our help, provided she is left untrammelled. But in the case 
rf our forests she has been hindered by man's shortsightedness and waste, Ine 
? orest will renew itself, if man does not interfere. But clean cutting leaving slash 
)n the ground, and forest fires not only destroy the present crop but kill the seeds 
md seedlings for future forest crops. Therefore, what man has destroyed, he must 
make good, if he would prosper. Otherwise, he must do as primitive man had the 
habit of doing, migrate to another part of the world, where the primeval forest , stiU 
existed, or do as the modern man does, bring at a great expense the products of the 
primeval forest at a distance to him here. This we are doing m Massachusetts at 
the present time. Our lumber supply is largely Oregon and the northwest. How 
ong will this supply last? . 

In Massachusetts a far-seeing legislature in 1919 passed a law committing the 
state to the purchase of 100,000 acres of wild and waste land, and the planting ol the 
same to pine and other conifers: This the Department of Conservation is endeavor- 
ing to do, as the legislature doles out to us small sums of money. The legislature ot 
1919 was generous, and succeeding sessions have been kind to us and far seeing, 
but a spirit of economy has interfered with our program Is this the time lor 
economy in this matter? Our opinion is that the time of economy is not when 
the state has just embarked on this great work. We have purchased many thou- 
sand acres of land, and have as yet planted only a small proportion of this. We 
desire to get the trees in the ground. Once they are there well-rooted and weeded 
and tended for a few years, the start is made, and the forest crop of future genera- 
tions is established. In order to do this, our nurseries must be kept in good running 
order and if necessary, an increase in the number of trees ready for planting must 
be made each year, until we have satisfied all the demands for seedlings. 



4 



Conservation of Domestic Animals 



P.D. 




The work of the Division of Animal Industry in the control and eradication fr 

contagious diseases of our domestic animals is one of true conservation of valuab 
resources. The relation of our domestic animals to public health, to the productic 
of food and raiment, to agriculture and the many lines of commercial industr 
calls attention to the necessity of maintaining this relation at the proper standar 
which can only be accomplished by the prevention, control and eradication of tl 
several contagious diseases to which the animals are subject. 

When we consider that certain of our domestic animals furnish a large portio 
of the food supply by their products during life and by the utilization of thei 
carcasses when slaughtered, also that they are the original factors in the productic 
of raiment for the people, that successful agriculture is not possible without ther 
that many lines of business are dependent upon their use as toilers on the farms < 
servants in transportation, and that the present progress in scientific protection i 
the public health is being greatly aided by their use in the laboratory, it can readi. 1 
be seen that the function of the Division of Animal Industry in the maintenanr 
of the health of our domestic animals is a very important one in the whole schen; 
of public welfare. 

A branch of the division's work which has developed very rapidly in recent yea. 
is the eradication of bovine tuberculosis by the use of the tuberculin test. Th 
work is of great value, not only in improvement of health conditions of live stocl 
but it is an important factor in lowering the incidence of human tuberculosis duj 
to bovine origin. Many cattle owners have a laudable desire to eliminate tuber cuks 
sis from their herds and this work is receiving strong support, not only from the \rf\ 
stock owners, but also from public health officials who realize that it is a great aid j 
the protection of the health of the people in its relation to purification of the mil 
supply. The growth in public sentiment approving the work now being done i 
this direction and the activities of local health officials to the same end, have resultei 
in a greatly increased demand for the service of this division in the tuberculin tesj 
ing of cattle. 

The number of town and city boards of health which have passed ordinance 
requiring that all raw milk sold in their municipalities shall have been produced b« 
cows which have passed an official tuberculin test, has rapidly increased during th) 
past year. We have on file a large number of requests for this service for which 
hope appropriation by the coming legislature will be made. No legislation in assist- 
ance of the administration of the so-called tuberculin test law shall be asked fcl 
this year, except a slight amendment of the Act which refers to the marking fcl 
identification of animals which react to the tuberculin test. 

I refer to the accompanying report of the Director of Animal Industry for 1 
detailed description of the service of this division. 



The public is rapidly taking an increased interest in wild life sanctuaries. It i 
natural for any one to immediately assume that when a given area has been aci 
quired to be a State Forest, or for the purpose of carrying on forestry activities 
such area should immediately be regarded as an ideal wild life sanctuary. W 
are coming to realize that this is not the case. While the State Forests may be 
in many respects, favorable regions for certain forms of wild life, nevertheles 
conflicts will sooner or later appear that are largely insuperable. 

For example, a State Forest is regarded primarily as a lumber proposition. I J 
will be many years before esthetic considerations will be much of a factor in detei] 
mining the use of such forests. That growing tendency will be to require thes] 
forests to make a return upon the money invested. On them the modern businesj 
administration of forestry must be applied. When the trees are in their prime fo] 
lumber purposes they will be cut down, — on a system, to be sure, but nevertheles? 
cut down. We have no criticism of this routine, believing that it is the prope 
administration of our State Forests as such. We are setting apart and growin; 1 
these forests for the reason that we need the lumber. The fact that such a fores! 
will be a beautiful thing on the landscape must of necessity be a secondary con- 
sideration. 

In order to avoid fire hazards, underbrush must be cleared away. After a cutting 



Conservation of Wild Life 



'.D. 73 5 

le slash must be removed. A certain amount of cultivation must be carried on, 
ich as the elimination of all shrubs that may be an intermediate host in the spread- 
lg of diseases of our trees. There are other respects in which we could develop 
le idea, but the foregoing is sufficient to show that the development of a forest is a 
usiness proposition, and such considerations as can be given to the welfare of the 
ild life on the area are of decidedly secondary importance. 
The selection of a wild life sanctuary involves an entirely different set of consider- 
tions. On such sanctuary it would be desirable to have sections of substantial 
•ee growth as protection to certain species of wild life. When a tree reaches its 
rime it will not be cut down. A certain number of such trees, gradually going to 
ecay, afford the finest feeding grounds for some of our insectivorous birds, as well 
3 nesting places. On other areas, even desirable trees will not be permitted to 
row beyond a given size before they must be thinned out in order to maintain a 
niform sapling growth that will be favorable to such species as the woodcock, both 
i the breeding and migrating seasons. On other areas food-bearing shrubs of all 
inds should be maintained in abundance, even with the possibility of some fire 
sk. Other areas that may be suitable for the growth of certain trees should be 
mdered unfit for such growth by the flooding necessary to maintain breeding and 
seding areas for water fowl. And thus the propositions could be amplified over 
lany details. It is well to keep this distinction in mind when we consider the 
lbject of State Forests and wild life sanctuaries. It has been demonstrated in the 
lyles Standish State Forest that deer and a State Forest do not always get along 
ell together, and in such an event the deer will either have to be driven off, or else 
iduced in numbers to a harmless minimum. On an area designed primarily as a 
ild life sanctuary, they could roam at will. 

On some of our forests, however, while they are in the process of development, 
will be quite feasible to apply some of the sanctuary principles. For example, 
portion of such forests can be set aside as a wild life sanctuary, and in this area 
mch can be done to make it increasingly attractive to wild life without retarding 
>rest development. Other areas may be open to public shooting under proper 
Dntrol. But in the long run, the best results will be obtained, in so far as wild 
fe is concerned, by selecting for sanctuary purposes areas most naturally favorable 
) the development of an abundant food supply and a biological environment as 
early permanent as it is possible to make it. 

State Forests 

The purchase of land for state forests has continued through the year. A total 
F 10,877.627 acres has been acquired in 1925. It was intended by this department 
) finish if possible the purchase of the 100,000 acres of land required by the act of 
le legislature of 1920 this year, thus leaving the balance of money and time for the 
evelopment of the land. But lack of funds has limited our purchases this year. 

The land is distributed as follows : 



Beartown State Forest ....... 552.83 

Clarksburg State Forest 444. 

Colrain State Forest ....... 12. 

Conway State Forest ....... 26. 

Erving State Forest 91.5 

Hubbardston State Forest 28.87 

Monroe State Forest 317.6 

Myles Standish State Forest . . . 106.81 

Oakham State Forest ....... 84. 

October Mountain State Forest . . 45. 

Otis State Forest 1,298.3 

Otter River State Forest 28.25 

Sandisfield State Forest 765.05 

Shawme State Forest 2,671.107 

Shutesbury State Forest 120.36 

Tolland-Granville State Forest 1,200. 

Wendell State Forest 316.4 

Windsor State Forest 594.8 



6 P.D. 7c 

New Forests 

Barre State Forest 233.5 

Brimfield State Forest 463.5 

Martha's Vineyard State Forest . . . . 25. 

Oxford State Forest 28.7 

Warwick State Forest 358. 

Unassigned 146. 

There was also acquired by exchange the following: 

Mohawk Trail State Forest 118. 

Monroe State Forest 570.97 

Savoy Mountain State Forest 231.08 



10,877.627 

Standish Monument Reservation 

We are pleased to report that the last session of the General Court made ar 
appropriation to be applied to the repair of the statue of Captain Myles Standish 
which surmounts the monument and which was seriously damaged by lightning 
during an electrical storm in 1922. 

Since this reservation was taken over by the Commonwealth there has been i 
steady increase in interest shown on the part of the public as attested by the 
multitudes who visit it each year. Mr. Wilfred C. Dawes, the custodian, reports 
that during the season commencing May 23, 1925, and ending October 12, 1925 
there was a total of 85,601 visitors and of this number 9,516 ascended the monu- 
ment. A fee of ten cents was charged for admission to the tower, making a revenue 
of $951.60 from this source. As in previous years, visitors came from each state ic 
the union and from all parts of the world, even from South America, South Africa, 
and New Zealand. 

Because of the great number of visitors to this reservation, the Commissioner has 
for the past three years recommended the construction of a comfort station there 
but we regret to say that up to the present time no financial provision has beeD 
made for the erection of this much needed convenience. 

White Pine Blister Rust 

The Massachusetts Department of Agriculture, through its Division of Plant: 
Pest Control, continued during the year 1925 its participation in the state-wide 
campaign to prevent the further spread of the white pine blister rust — a serious 
plant disease which is fatal in its attack upon white pine trees. The control ol 
this disease is accomplished by the elimination of currant and gooseberry bushes' 
which are the alternate host plants of the fungus which causes this disease. Dur-. 
ing the year, the department rendered assistance to 1,763 land owners in making; 
examinations on 194,851 acres of land, 110,892 acres of which are producing white 
pine. The cooperating owners expended the equivalent of $5,554.15 in this pro-' 
tective work. From these lands, 706,830 wild and 33,610 cultivated currant andj 
gooseberry bushes were eradicated at a total average cost of 11 cents per acre. 

The stage of the disease as it appears on white pine, has been recorded in 187 
towns in Massachusetts up to November 30, 1925. These figures indicate that the 
disease is generally distributed throughout the state in local centres from which 
there is likely to be a spread unless the alternate host plants are promptly elimi- 
nated. 

Lectures and Conventions 

The sustained interest in forestry is shown by the numerous requests for lectures, 
most of them illustrated by lantern slides. During 1924 these lectures numbered' 
105, only two less than the high-water mark reached in 1924. 

In addition the department was represented at the following meetings outside of 
the state: 

New England Foresters, Old Orchard, Me. 
Conference on State Parks, Skyland, Va. 
Forest Fire Conference, Washington, D. C. 




Exhibits 



As usual the department put in an extensive exhibit in the state building at the 
Eastern States Fair. A central feature of this exhibit was a forest scene in minia- 
ture, or rather two scenes, that on the right picturing a cut-over and burned-over 
country with a fire still burning, a dried-up river and a deserted community, while 
on the left was the green forest, an active sawmill, prosperous homes and a clear 
running stream, a vivid picture of the difference between forest conservation and 
devastation. 

We also made up a traveling exhibit on two auto trailers, one containing forest 
fire equipment and the second nursery stock which we took to the Barre and 
Gardner fairs. 

An exhibit was placed in the New Ocean House at Swampscott on the occasion 
of the annual meeting of the State Federation of Women's Clubs. 

The stereomotograph with its colored slides was loaned to ten libraries for periods 
of from one to three weeks. 

Extension Forestry 
The Clarke-McNary bill passed by Congress at the last session provides for co- 
operation between the Federal government and the states in different lines of 
forestry work, one of these being "farm forestry extension," which means the 
education of the farmer and small woodlot owner in the management of his wood 
and waste lands. Massachusetts receives from the Federal appropriation $1,500 per 
year through the Agricultural Extension Service at Amherst. Through the co- 
operation of the director for this state, Mr. J. D. Willard, this money is paid over 
to this department and we carry out the program of forestry extension. All 
educational work and contacts with the woodlot owners is classed as extension 
work and is carried out as far as possible in cooperation with the county agricultural 
extension services. As this arrangement was only completed about the first of 
October, it is too early to detail any results thus far. 



Recommendations of the Department of Conservation 
Division of Forestry 

1. Prevention of Forest Fires. While the operation of the forest fire prevention 
system has been productive of gratifying results, the Commissioner is convinced 
that the laws under which it was created can be so amended as to make it far more 
effective in the future. When it is considered that the department has already 
acquired in the name of the Commonwealth approximately 100,000 acres of land 
for forestry purposes, and will continue to acquire land for that purpose for several 
years to come, it becomes apparent how essential it is to afford the greatest amount 
of fire protection possible. 

Under existing statutes in towns, forest wardens are appointed by the selectmen 
and in cities by the mayor and aldermen. These wardens have sole charge of the 
prevention and extinguishment of fires which occur within their respective towns. 
Inasmuch as the State Forester is charged in a general way with the control of 
forest fires throughout the state, it seems logical that he should be given more 
power with respect to the creation of a fire-fighting organization. 

It is, therefore, recommended that the appointment of these forest wardens be 
given to the State Forester. 

The Commissioner is also of the opinion that a part of the cost of extinguishing 
fires should be borne by the Commonwealth. Past experience has shown that while 
many towns consider the cost of fighting forest fires a serious burden, some towns 
even find it practically prohibitive. The forested areas of the state are found in the 
towns with the smallest valuation, and in such towns there is a reluctance to expend 
an adequate amount of money in fighting forest fires. 

As a very large proportion of the state-owned forest, lands are situated in these 
towns and as it is an acknowledged fact that forests are a distinct advantage to the 
Commonwealth and are enjoyed by all its people, it seems only just that the entire 
Commonwealth should share in the necessary cost of protecting them. 

2. Forest Tree Nursery. Owing to the increasing demand for young trees for 
use on privately owned land in the central and western parts of the state and 



8 P.D. 73 

because millions of trees will be required to plant the land already acquired for state 
forests in those sections of the state, the Commissioner believes that a nursery 
more centrally located than any we have at present should be established and would 
recommend that the existing statutes be so amended as to authorize him to do so. 

Recommendations of the Division of Fisheries and Game 

1. Salary of Director. Owing to the steady growth of the volume of business in 
this division, it is the opinion of the Commissioner that the director is not receiving 
a salary commensurate with his duties and responsibilities. The Commissioner, 
therefore, recommends that the salary be increased. 

2. Fishing in Inland Waters. Today no license is required to fish in ponds or 
streams not stocked subsequent to January 1, 1910. While the greater number of 
ponds and streams have been so stocked, the law requires the publication yearly 
of a list of stocked waters at the expense of considerable effort and money for their 
compilation and publication. If the Commonwealth has expended substantial 
sums to stock ponds prior to January 1, 1910, from which our fishermen are now 
receiving benefits, there is no logical reason for permitting these ponds to be fished 
without the purchase of a license. This requirement of law leads to considerable 
confusion and serves no practical purpose and should therefore be repealed. 

3. Taking of Pickerel. The penalty for illegally taking pickerel is now fixed at 
one dollar whereas other species are protected by a minimum fine of ten dollars. 
As pickerel cannot be artificially propagated and must be maintained through the 
medium of protection, it is essential that an adequate and uniform penalty be pre- 
scribed by means of which protection can be enforced. 

4. Fishing Tackle. At the present time a person is entitled to use ten traps for 
fishing through the ice. The principal fish caught in fishing through the ice is the 
pickerel. It begins to congregate on the breeding grounds early in the period when 
the ice forms, and remains in these localities until the spawning season starts about 
the time the ice leaves the ponds. These areas are well known to the fishermen and 
for that reason the ponds are more intensively fished through this period than at 
any other time in the year. Our investigation shows that 90 per cent of the pickerel 
taken through the ice are female fish containing spawn. We are not able to artifi- 
cially propagate the pickerel and must rely on natural reproduction to keep up the 
stock in our ponds. The reduction of the ice fisherman's gear by 50 per cent will 
be a partial correction of the great destruction of pickerel which takes place during 
the period that our ponds and streams are covered by ice. This contemplated 
change in the law will have little effect on the summer fisherman. 

5. Lobster Fishing. This act provides a penalty on the fisherman who dumps 
or destroys lobsters or receptacles containing them after he has been ordered by a 
warden to halt and display the lobsters in his possession. Wardens are seriously 
handicapped because of the fact that fishermen dump illegal lobsters when in danger 
of apprehension. In no other way can this practice be adequately stopped. 

6. Search and Seizure under the Law respecting Fish and Game. Under existing 
law no officer of the division can obtain from any of our judges a warrant to search 
a dwelling house in order to obtain evidence of a violation of the fish and game laws. 
Short lobsters may be taken, and fish, birds and quadrupeds illegally killed, and if 
they can be gotten into a dwelling house they are safe from pursuit and the viola- 
tors cannot be apprehended with their quarry. Unless our officers can have the 
use of search warrants under such conditions, with suitable safeguards to prevent 
any unreasonable violations of the right of privacy, it will continue to be extremely 
difficult, if not impossible, to stop many persistent violations of the fish and game 
laws. 

7. Lobster and Crab Fishing. At the present time no license is required to set 
traps for the purpose of catching crabs. Yet the traps used in this fishery will 
take lobsters for the taking of which a license is required. Unless this law is 
extended to cover the taking of crabs it will be impossible to enforce the lobster 
license law as it should be enforced. This act will also impose a penalty upon any 
person who obtains a lobster fisherman's license by making false representations. 

8. To Reduce the Fee for a Sporting License Issued to Non-residents of the State. 
It has become apparent that dissatisfaction has arisen over the fees charged to non- 
residents for both the straight sporting license and the special non-resident sporting 



P.D. 73 9 

licenses as they were established by the last General Court. The accompanying 
bill is submitted without any specific recommendation as to the proper fees to be 
charged for these classes of licenses, in order that the matter may be opened for 
discussion and all parties given an opportunity to present their views. 

9. Training of Hunting Dogs. Under the present law dogs cannot be trained 
on any protected species of birds or game between March 1 and September 1. This 
law does not prohibit the taking of fox hounds into the woods during this time or 
other dogs under the guise of hunting unprotected game. This serves to defeat 
the purposes of the law, i. e., to protect birds and game from disturbance during the 
breeding and nesting season and during the time when the young stock is practically 
helpless. Unless the wild life is free from all disturbance during this time the best 
results of conservation cannot be accomplished and for that reason it is recom- 
mended that the law be amended so as to prohibit the training or running of all 
dogs during the time above-mentioned. 

10. To Amend the Law Relative to Deer. When the laws were re-codified the 
phraseology used in the deer law was such as to create a doubt as to what its real 
intent was concerning the possession of deer in the close season. This recommenda- 
tion is to clarify the law on this point and to establish a law which can be enforced. 

11. To Provide a Close Season on Ruffed Grouse in Dukes County. The decrease 
of ruffed grouse in this county has become apparent and the only way in which the 
decrease can be stopped and the birds restored in goodly numbers is through the 
medium of a close season of sufficient duration to reestablish them securely. That 
this can be done is demonstrated in the case of quail, which have become plentiful 
in this county as a result of a close season of several years with the result that an 
open season on quail in that county was possible this year. 

12. Hunting on State Reservations. A law was passed at the last session of the 
General Court allowing the Commissioner of Conservation to declare an open 
season on deer in state forest reservations, but with the provision that authorization 
to hunt on such reservations should be by written permit. When the time came to 
-declare such an open season, it became immediately apparent that such a method 
was not practical and that all persons holding a sporting license should be allowed 
to hunt on such reservations if such an open season was declared. The purpose 
of this act is to eliminate the requirement of written permits for this form of hunting. 

Recommendations of the Division of Animal Industry 

1 . Salary of Director. Owing to the steady growth in the volume of business in 
this division, it is the opinion of the Commissioner that the director is not receiving 
a salary commensurate with his duties and responsibilities. The Commissioner, 
therefore, recommends that the salary be increased. 

2. Tuberculin Test. A detail of the administration of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 
(commonly called the "tuberculin test" law), is the marking of animals found 
diseased on the application of tuberculin test. At present, such animals are identi- 
fied by a metal tag placed in the animal's ear, a method which in many instances 
fails to accomplish the desired purpose. Tags are frequently torn out of animals' 
ears by becoming caught on other objects, such as wire fences, etc.; they are some- 
times forcibly removed by dishonest persons who seek to substitute cheaper animals 
at time of slaughter, a practice which is very difficult of detection. 

Such occurrences render difficult the satisfactory completion of the many details 
which are necessary to prove the validity of claims for payment by the Common- 
wealth of the indemnity provided by law to such cases. 

Experiments are now being conducted to find a means of identification which is 
practical, and at the same time unalterable either by accident or by wilful attempt 
at dishonesty. 

In order that such means of identification may be at once instituted when found, 
I am submitting a bill to the legislature amending Chapter 129 of the General Laws 
as amended by Chapter 156 of the Acts of nineteen hundred twenty-four. 



10 



Part II 



P.D. 73 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

Because of the unfortunate attitude of the Governor in reducing the appropria- 
tions for this department, the forestry program outlined in our previous reports was 
seriously retarded. This reduction of funds forced us to curtail our much- needed 
development work on the state forests, obliging us to cut out in 1925 in large 
measure the practice of silvicultural methods on the state forests, such as needed 
thinning operations, fire lines, roads and planting of trees. 

The effect of the attitude of the Governor on the suppression of gypsy and brown- 
tail moths was reflected in many cities and towns, causing them to cut down their 
appropriations for the work, and thus to leave undone much necessary work in the 
infested area. As a result of this, I am sorry to be obliged to report a marked in- 
crease of the insects this present season. This is especially true of the Cape Cod 
region, where 40,000 acres were completely or appreciably defoliated this summer. 
The result of this condition will be a large increase in expenditures in the future. 

We are fortunate in this state in having the headquarters of the Northeast 
Forest Experiment Station of the United States Forest Service located at Amherst. 
This department is able to work in close co-operation with S. T. Dana, the director, 
and his corps of scientists to our mutual advantage. 

Organization 

William A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner and State Forester 
Charles O. Bailey, Secretary 
Harold O. Cook, Chief Forester 

D. C. A. Galarneau, Forester in Western Massachusetts 
Frank L. Haynes, Asst. Forester, Land Purchase 
James Morris, Asst. Forester, Nurseries 

Robert B. Parmenter, Asst. Forester, Mapping and Reforestation 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden 
George A. Smith, Moth Superintendent 

District Forest Wardens District Moth Superintendents 

1. James E. Moloy, Woburn 1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River 2. William A. Hatch, Marlborough 

3. Wm. Day, Wareham 3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill 

4. John P. Crowe, Westborough 4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Foxborough 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield 5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay 

6. Jos. L. Peabody, Winchendon 6. Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester 

7. Verne J. Fitzroy, Savoy 

State Plantations 
One new lot of sixty acres was planted and four others were completed. In 
addition, two lots were filled in and four replanted which had either been totally or 
partially burned over. In all, 243,500 transplants were set out during the months 
of April and May. These plantings were all successful and are all putting on good 
growth. 

Liberation cuttings were made on thirteen reforestation lots comprising a total 
of 547 acres. We believe that liberation cuttings are of as much importance in 
forestry practice as reforestation. The following is a list of the lots worked on 
during the past year, giving the name of the lot, location, and work done. 

Baker Box, Barre — 35,000 trees planted. 

Shoot Flying Hill, Barnstable — 5,000 trees planted. 

Bazeley, Uxbridge — 6,000 trees planted. 

Brewster, Plymouth — 15,000 trees planted. 

Crocker-Burbank, Ashburnham — 35,000 trees planted. 

French, Hubbardston — 30,000 trees planted. 

Hansen, Marlboro — 80,000 trees planted. 

Herrick, Lynnfield — 6,000 trees planted. 

Merrill, West Brookfield— 20,000 trees planted. 

Pond, Leyden — 10,000 trees planted. 



\D. 73 11 

Fiske, Weston — 1,500 trees planted. 
Fullam, Oakham — Liberation cutting (115 acres). 
Spencer, Oakham — Liberation cutting (70 acres). 
Town of Templeton, Templeton — Liberation cutting (60 acres). 
Davis & Hadley, Templeton — Liberation cutting (107 acres). 
Lamb, Templeton — Liberation cutting (50 acres) and fire line. 
Town of Berkley, Berkley — Liberation cutting (12 acres). 
Fullam, West Brookfield — Liberation cutting (70 acres). 
Holmes, Kingston — Liberation cutting (14 acres). 
Jones River, Kingston — Liberation cutting (140 acres). 
Fiske, Buckland — Liberation cutting (10 acres). 
Weeks, Sandwich — Liberation cutting (20 acres). 
Holmes, West Brookfield — Liberation cutting (46 acres). 
Addie Browne, Marlboro — Liberation cutting (45 acres). 

Forest Survey 

The work of completing the forest and type survey of the entire state was pushed 
forward during the past summer, with the result that Franklin County was com- 
pleted and the western part of Hampden County was done. We find that the sum- 
mer is the best time to do this work, as the working conditions are perfect and also 
the men who handle the field work are forestry students who are getting their field 
experience and are available at this time. 

This department, with the first-hand knowledge of growing conditions, cutting 
conditions and marketing conditions, gained through these surveys, is better able 
to tell the individual how to handle his wood crop to get the most out of it. We can 
learn how to manage our own forests from data noted in the survey. 

Examinations 

We have continued the service of advising owners of woodlands or shade trees 
on the proper handling of these lands or trees, by an examination of the property 
itself. We consider this to be the most satisfactory method of teaching owners 
the proper care of their woodlands. 

Subject Number 
Thinning and planting ....... 6 



Planting 
Operating . 
Insects and diseases 
Thinning 



20 
6 

14 
12 



Acres 
4,100 
2,460 
440 
260 
1,050 



Nurseries 58 8,310 

During the year 1925 there were shipped from the state nurseries more than 
4,000,000 trees. These were practically all transplants and were distributed as 
follows : 

Sold . . . 
State Institutions 
State Forests 



State Reforestation Lots 
Town Forests 



1,420,084 
407,135 
1,597,100 
262,000 
321,100 



Total 4,007,419 

The total was made up of approximately 15 different species, but more than 80 

per cent consisted of white pine, spruce, Scotch pine, Austrian pine and red pine. 

A large proportion of the Scotch and Austrian pine were set out on the dunes of the 

Province Lands at Provincetown. 

We now have three main nurseries and eight reservation nurseries located as 

follows: — Main nurseries at Amherst, Bridgewater and Barnstable; reservation 

nurseries at Myles Standish Forest, Carver; Otter River Forest, Winchendon; 

Martha's Vineyard Forest, Martha's Vineyard; Erving Forest, Erving; Mohawk 

Trail Forest, Charlemont; Savoy Mountain Forest, Savoy; Arthur Warton Swann 

Forest, Monterey; October Mountain Forest, Lee. 
A new main nursery will be partially completed next spring on the Clinton-West 

Boylston state road on lands of the Metropolitan Water Department. This de- 



12 p.d. n 

partment has kindly loaned 25 acres of land suitable for tree production and w( 
believe that as soon as this nursery is operating efficiently it may be possible U. 
produce enough trees to take care of the increased demands made on us by privatt 
land owners and newly established town forests. 

Our fall inventory showed the total content of all nurseries to be in the vicinitj 
of 18,000,000 trees. Of this number about 10,000,000 are seedlings and 8,000,0(X 
are transplants. We estimate that 4,500,000 transplant stock will be large enougr 
for spring field planting and over 5,000,000 seedlings will be transplanted in th( 
nurseries. 

State Forests 

Owing to the reduction in our appropriations, the work of developing on state 
forests was seriously curtailed. Much of the land included in these forests is cut- 
over timberland or abandoned pasture land coming up to a mixed growth of both 
worthless and valuable species. Such stands need to be weeded by the removal! 
of the poor kinds of trees which invariably overtop and kill out the worthwhile 
timber growth. In other cases where valuable species are wanting they are intro-| 
duced by planting. In either case this sort of work can be done much more economi- 
cally and successfully in the early life of the forest, and in fact, if neglected too long,] 
the opportunity is lost for an entire forest generation. 

Forest fires did comparatively little damage on state forests this past season. 
One fire burned 100 acres on the Erving forest and another burned 20 acres of ten-] 
year-old pine plantation on the Ashburnham Forest. 

Myles Standish Forest. A new forest road to Federal Pond was constructed andj 
the fire lines around the reservation were plowed and harrowed. A small amount' 
of improvement cutting was done on planted land near Barrett's Pond. In the- 
spring 225,000 trees were set out. Several new private camps have been built at! 
the various ponds, including a Girl Scout Camp at Barrett's Pond. The nursery 
was continued with the transplanting of 375,000 seedlings. Minor repairs were 
made in buildings, including a cement foundation for the pump house and a separate 1 
room made in the barn to hold all fire equipment. The reservation crew gave' 
important help at a large fire which occurred near Ellisville. 

Tolland-Granville Forest. Planted 39,000 trees in spring, one-half spruce and one- 
half Austrian pine, and brushed out about eight miles of forest roads. The Coe 
house received some repairs in order that it might be habitable by the superin- 
tendent. Four old barns not needed on the forest were burned or torn down. Five* 
old wells were cleared and covered to serve as reservoirs in case of fire. 

October Mountain Forest. About 250,000 spruce transplants were set out in the 
spring. Further improvements were made on the main road by the use of 100 
loads of stone and cinders and two bridges were rebuilt and some of the forest roads 
mowed over. It was decided to abandon the old headquarters house for the winter 
and use instead the so-called Clark house nearer town and thus avoid the necessity 
of keeping open four miles of road all winter. For this reason some repairs were 
made on the Clark house and the garage. A start was made in thinning some of the 
more valuable hardwood growth. 

Mount Grace Forest. The only work done here was the planting of 10,000 Scotch 
pines in the spring. 

Wendell Forest. The small brush on six miles of forest road was cut and some of 
it burned. Sixty-nine thousand trees were planted during the spring. 

Erving Forest. During the winter we thinned out several acres of mixed hard- 
woods pine and hemlock, selling the cord wood at a good price. During the spring 
27,000 trees were set in the field and 128,000 seedlings put in the nursery. The 
road to Laurel Lake was made passable for automobiles by removal of rocks and 
placing of drains. Other forest roads were cleared of brush. A start was made 
towards making the "Kurtz" house habitable as a headquarters, but it was soon 
decided that the building was too far gone to repair and it was torn down. 

Otter River Forest. During the winter the merchantable pine logs on the area 
burned over in the fire of 1924 were cut and sold to the New England Box Company. 
In the spring 53,000 trees were set on this burned area and 544,000 seedlings trans- 
planted into the nursery. Twenty-three thousand more trees were set in the fall. 
Some forest roads and trails were cleared of brush and several wells and water 



I P.D. 73 13 

I holes made for fire protection. The well at the headquarters house was declared 
I unfit for drinking by the Board of Health, so a new one was dug. 
I Ashburnham Forest. Roadside brush has been cleared on about four miles. The 
I plantation on the Atherton Lot was released by cutting out the grey birch. Some 
ten acres of pine and hemlock slash were piled and burned on the Cory Lot. Blister 
rust work was carried on on the Lawrence Lot and 45,000 ribes plants were pulled. 
A number of water holes were dug and fenced on the forest as a help in fire pro- 
tection. 

Swann Forest. Road work included grading with gravel and ditching over three- 
quarters of a mile; two and one-quarter miles of forest road were brushed and one 
and one-half miles of trail cleared. About 6,000 trees were planted in the field. 
The Lodge was shingled and some minor repairs made on other buildings. Some 
.of the older plantations were given a release cutting and an attempt made to reduce 
the pine weevil infestation. The work of salvaging the dead chestnut was con- 
tinued and 1,076 ties cut and removed. About all the merchantable chestnuts 
have now been taken out. A number of acres of young growth were improved by 
a weeding and older growth improved by thinning. 

Beartovm Forest. Work on this forest was confined to the planting of 71,000 
Norway spruce and the clearing of one-half mile of boundary line. 

Harold Parker Forest. A new fire line and road about one and one-half miles 
long was constructed from Rocky Hill to Converse Road and four miles of old fire 
lines renewed. About 16 acres of mixed softwood and hardwood growth were 
thinned by removal of the poorer hardwoods, producing 80 cords of wood. Some 
25,000 Austrian pines were set on the Emerson Lot and some bad spots in the forest 
roads repaired. The County Blister Rust Agent, Mr. Root, gave us valuable 
assistance in eradicating the wild currants and gooseberries on this reservation 
> and saving the valuable young pine growth of the forest from pine blister rust. 

Savoy Forest. Seventy-five thousand trees, mostly spruce, were planted on this 
forest and 199,000 seedlings transplanted into the nursery. Five miles of 
forest roads were repaired and brush mowed on three miles. About 50 acres of 
young spruce, both natural and planted, were cleared by cutting out hardwoods, 
and a few acres of mixed growth thinned. 

Mohawk Trail Forest. On this forest about five miles of forest roads were cleared 
of fallen trees, the result of the ice storm of 1921. A garage was built at the 
Botinelly place and the caretaker at the auto-camp grounds was permitted to build 
a wooden camp in place of the tent which he had been occupying. The caretaker 
i reports that not as many automobile parties used the camp grounds as during 1924, 
I but that on the whole they were a better class of people. It was found that in 
some sections of the forest the ice storm had so severely broken the tops of the hard- 
wood growth, especially the white birch, that the trees were slowly dying so that in 
order to salvage this material this white birch growth, together with some ash, was 
sold to a local timber operator. Planting was carried on by the use of 100,000 
four-year spruce. 

Shawme Forest. (Cape Cod.) Extensive fire line work is being carried out on 
this forest by the construction of a line 50 feet to 100 feet wide plowed on the inside 
edge and with a road running down the middle. About one and one-half miles of 
such line was completed and one and one-half miles more nearly so. In addition, 
two miles of forest road were brushed and 172,000 trees, principally Austrian and 
Scotch pine, planted. A woodshed was built for the headquarters house. 

Clarksburg Forest. The "Long Trail" of the Green Mountain Club reaches the 
Massachusetts line at a point on the north boundary of the Clarksburg, Forest. 
The Appalachian Mountain Club was very anxious to connect the Green Mountain 
Trail with the Mount Greylock Reservation. To co-operate with the Appalachian 
Mountain Club the department cleared a trail from the Vermont line down to the 
village of Blackinton through the State Forest. The club is to complete the trail 
across the Hoosac Valley up to Mount Greylock where it will connect with one of 
j the existing trails. 

Sandisfield Forest. Work on this forest was confined to the planting of 70,000 
I trees on what is known as the Whiteneck Farm. 

Worthington Forest. Work on this tract was confined to the planting of 32,000 
spruce in the spring. 



14 P.D. 71 

Windsor Forest. Planted 17,000 spruce during the spring. 

Martha's Vineyard Forest. On this, one of the younger of our state forests. 
600,000 seedlings were transplanted into the nursery, a start made on the construe^ 
tion of fire lines and forest roads, and a small cabin made into a headquarter's house. 

Colrain Forest. Some five miles of roads previously cleared were mowed ovei 
and an experiment tried in the pruning of the lower branches on two acres of the 
fourteen-year-old pine plantation. 

Area of the State Forests, November 30, 1925 



Name of Forest Acreage 

Arthur Warton Swann 986 . 75 

Ashburnham ......... 958.075 

Barre 233.5 

BashBish 390.08 

Beartown 7,399.93 

Blandford •. 1,419.5 

Brimfield 463.5 

Clarksburg 1,764. 

Colrain 1,206.194 

Conway 1,286.12 

Erving .......... 4,431.565 

Harold Parker 1,327.6 

Hawley 1,523. 

Hubbardston • . . . 724.37 

Leominster ......... 637.7 

Martha's Vinevard . 1,640.47 

Mohawk Trail 5,251 . 1 

Monroe .......... 2,481.57 

Mount Grace 1,065.825 

Myles Standish 8,869. 

Northfield 235.4875 

Oakham 504.05 

October Mountain 13,363.8 

Otis .... 2,772.81 

Otter River 1,812.46 

Oxford . ' 28.7 

Peru 1,060. 

Petersham 248.15 

Pittsfield ' 1,082.54 

Sandisfield . 2,994.75 

Savoy Mountain . ........ 6,916.98 

Shawme 8,372.01 • 

Shutesbury . . . . . . . . 579 . 36 

Spencer . . . . . . ... 274. 

Sutton 209.5615 

Templeton 86.76 

Tolland-Granville 4,577. 

Warwick 904.7 

Wendell 4,168.47 

Westminster 250 . 95 

Windsor 1,417.05 

Worthington .......... 225. 

Unassigned lots 1,239.325 



♦97,383.763 

Report of the State Fire Warden 
Mr. William A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with the provisions of section 28, chapter 48 of the General 

* This figure includes lands purchased by the State Forest Commission, lands acquired under the Re- 
forestation Act, and takings on Myles Standish, Martha's Vineyard and Shawme forests. Much of thii 
land acquired by takings and not already paid for will be paid for later as the owners can be located. 



P.D. 73 15 

Laws, I submit herewith a report of the work accomplished by this branch of the 
division during the year just ended. 

With the exception of the drought during the spring months we have had a very 
favorable fire season, although we had more high winds during the spring drought 
than we have experienced in many years. This, with the increased number of 
fires, made the extinguishment extremely difficult. We have endeavored this year 
to eliminate second-day fires and, with few exceptions, have been successful. This, 
of course, was partially made possible by the installation of power equipment, and 
it is pleasing to note that many towns and cities see the advantage of having 
equipment adaptable to the extinguishment of forest fires, and are purchasing trucks 
that can be driven through wood roads. These trucks are especially equipped and 
have shown their value by making it possible to reach a fire promptly and extinguish 
it in the incipient stage. 

In our endeavor to educate the public respecting the danger of forest fires, we 
have distributed several thousand cloth signs which have been posted in conspicu- 
ous places along roadsides, rivers and trails and in public places such as post offices 
and railroad stations. 

A new 68-foot forest fire observation tower was erected in the town of Oxford 
at a cost of nearly $2,000. This tower covers a very inflammable and dangerous 
area and will be one of the most important stations in the state. The towns of 
Douglass, Millbury, Northbridge, Oxford, Sutton and Webster each contributed 
$200 towards the purchase of this tower. 

Several of our towers were repainted and minor repairs were made. Telephone 
lines leading to them were brushed out and new lines installed where it was neces- 
sary. Roads and trails leading to the stations were kept in condition so that visitors 
could have easy access. Over 30,000 people visited our various stations this past 
year, coming from every state in the Union as well as several foreign countries. 

I am in hopes that we may be able to erect a large tower in the town of Holbrook 
this year, as it is needed to better protect the vast forested area in that vicinity. 
Several of the towns that will receive protection have signified their desire to con- 
tribute very liberally. 

Co-operative work between the Federal Government and this department was 
continued under the Weeks Law up to July 1, 1925, and under the new Clarke- 
McNary Law since that time. The state allotment under this agreement has been 
increased from $8,400 to $12,600. Mr. J. G. Peters of Washington, chief of the 
state co-operative work, spent a week inspecting the work carried on in Massachu- 
setts, and expressed himself as well pleased with the work that has been accom- 
plished. 

It is unfortunate that the forest fire bill which was approved by both branches of 
the legislature last winter did not become a law. This department will never be 
able to handle the fire situation with any degree of satisfaction until it has control 
of the entire working force and the smaller towns are relieved of a portion of the 
expense of extinguishing fires. As long as we only have authority to aid and advise 
local wardens and cannot issue definite instructions and insist that they be carried 
out, just so long shall we continue to have unchecked and damaging fires. 

John P. Crowe, who has been associated with this department for the past four- 
teen years in charge of district number five, has, in addition to this, devoted a great 
deal of time to construction work. He has been relieved of the work in his district 
and will devote his entire time to construction work, having charge of construction 
and field work in central and eastern Massachusetts. 

Charles L. Woodman will succeed Mr. Crowe in district number five. He has 
been connected with the department for some years in the surveying work, and, I 
feel, will make an excellent man for the place. 

The appropriation received for forest fires was not sufficient for carrying on the 
work. Owing to the early fire season, towers were opened from three to four weeks 
in advance of previous years. This necessitated the closing of all towers during the 
month of July, excepting on Saturdays and Sundays, and the early closing of them in 
the fall. If we had experienced a drought during the tall we should have been 
without funds and the towers could not have been kept open. 

Power gasoline pumps proved their value in the extinguishing of forest fires 
during the past season. I believe that when our appropriation admits of the 



16 P.D. 73 

purchase of more of them and the means of transporting them, we shall see a decided 

improvement in our fire losses. 

The new fire pump manufactured by the Fitzhenry-Guptill Company of Cam- 
bridge has proved to be very satisfactory. While it is somewhat heavier than other 
makes of fire pumps, this is a small matter compared to its efficiency and durability. 
It has two distinct advantages over other pumps; first, it is a plunger pump and 
not affected by sand and, second, it uses one-inch hose instead of inch and a naif as 
on other pumps. These items are very important in our work. 

We have at the present time fourteen power pumps distributed throughout the 
state. The majority of these are on our state reserv ations but are available for use 
outside when weather conditions permit. 

The department continued its policy of holding forest fire meetings throughout 
the state during the winter. Nine meetings were held and were attended by forest 
wardens, fire chiefs, selectmen, State Police, department representatives, railroad 
officials, representatives from adjoining states and the Federal Government. These 
meetings have always been very instructive and interesting and have done a great 
deal toward building up a better fire-fighting body of men. I doubt very much our 
being able to continue these meetings this winter owing to insufficient funds. 

We are having very few fires reported from the use of portable saw mills. This, 
I believe, is due to the fact that the majority are operated by gasoline engines. We 
are having very satisfactory results from the operators in complying with the so- 
called slash law. While it is necessary that our men inspect the various operations, 
there is a general spirit of co-operation that is very gracing. 

The results accomplished from the operation of the permit law are very unsatis- 
factory. Many of our wardens fail to grasp the importance of properly enforcing 
this law. In too many cases permits are issued without the warden's knowledge of 
the type of land to be burned and also whether sufficient help is at hand to control 
the fire. These facts are borne out by our records, which show that over 500 brush 
fires for which permits were issued went beyond control and burned over large 
areas. The practice of burning during the spring months, the most dangerous 
time of the year for fires, is unfortunate. Ov er 30,000 permits are issued each year 
during this period, and unless more precaution is taken in their Issuance, it will be 
necessary to confine all permits to rainy weather. We have had 150 violations of 
the permit law, and of this number thirty-seven cases were taken into court and 
fined and 113 paid the expense of extinguishing the fires. 

The portion of the law that applies to the disposal of brush along the highways 
has been difficult to enforce. Many tree wardens expend their town appropriation 
in the cutting of brush along the roadside but make no provision for removing it. 
If the brush is not to be removed it would be much better not to cut it as far as fire 
protection is concerned. 

Several miles of power lines have been inspected during the fall and reports to 
date indicate a general compliance with the slash law. These lines when properly 
cleaned make excellent fire lines. 

Many people have wondered if allowing campers on the state forest would not 
increase the fire hazard. For the past five years we have been leasing camp sites 
and allowing camping on the Myles Standish Forest and up to the present time no 
fires have been reported from this source. Campers are obliged to pile all brush 
cut and our men do all the burning. At College Pond the campers have purchased 
and equipped a truck and it is available for use not only at College Pond but at any 
of the ponds on the forest. 

The railroad fire situation remains as in former years, about twenty per cent of 
our fires being attributable to this cause. The acreage burned and damaged is a 
little in excess of last year. I believe that the neglecting of rights of way is responsi- 
ble more than any other one cause. In order to prevent railroad fires, the mechanical 
construction of each locomotive must be kept in perfect condition, and all grass 
and debris removed from the right of way at least twice a year. Then we should 
practically eliminate railroad fires. 

I desire to express my appreciation for the excellent work done by the South 
Shore and Barnstable County forestry organizations. They are made up of men 
directly interested in forest fire problems, each organization having over 150 mem- 



\D. 73 17 
ers. By their efforts they have created a spirit of co-operation that could not 
ave been attained in any other manner. 

The following tables show comparative damages, costs, etc., for the past three 
ears. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden. 



Comparative Damages by Forest Fires for the Past Three Years 



ear 

923 
924 
925 



Number 
of Fires 

2,672 
3,735 
3,310 



Acreage Cost to 
burned extinguish 



48,602 
47,522 
43,876 



$51,448 
85,477 
66,855 



Damage 

$161,043 
189,018 
194,741 



Average 
Acreage 
per Fire 
18.18 
12.72 
13.25 



Average 
Damage 
per Fire 
$60 27 
50 61 
58 83 



tanding trees 

ogs, lumber, cordwood 

uildings 

ridges, fences 

proutland . 

liscellaneous 

Totals . 



Types of Classified Damages 

1924 
$111,712 



43,191 00 
15,813 00 
1,937 00 
16,235 00 
130 00 

. $189,018 00 



1925 
$108,894 00 
32,627 00 
33,260 00 
1,768 00 
18,135 00 
57 00 

$194,741 00 



imber .... 
econd growth 

econd growth, not merchantable 
rush land .... 
rass land .... 

Totals .... 



Types of Land Burned Over (Acres) 

1924 
3,571 
9,450 
12,522 
16,144 
5,835 



1925 
2,490 
7,827 
10,837 
17,181 
5,541 



47,522 



43,876 



Forest Fires of 1925 



Months 

1924 

>ecember 

1925 
muary 
ebruary 
larch 
pril . 
lay . 
me . 

ily ■ 

ugust 
iptember 
ctober 
ovember 

Totals 



Number 


Acres 


Cost to 
Extinguish 


Damage 


66 


187 


$424 00 


$485 00 


35 
136 
683 
1,382 
451 
104 

65 
108 

76 

81 
123 


73 
329 
4,521 
23,531 
12,408 
254 
203 
1,152 
400 
370 
448 


156 00 
926 00 

6,633 00 
28,694 00 
16,500 00 

1,268 00 
567 00 

8,012 00 

1,946 00 
845 00 
884 00 


38 00 
411 00 
10,727 00 
105,054 00 
56,660 00 
4,575 00 
2,320 00 
9,979 00 
1,060 00 
1,754 00 
1,678 00 


3,310 


43,876 


$66,855 00 


$194,741 00 



18 P.D. 73 



Classified Causes of Forest Feres, 1924-1925 





1924 


1925 




N • r 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Riilr . . i 


997 


26.69 


673 


20.33 


Lumbering .... 


4 


.10 


5 


.15 


Brush burning .... 


-±-t i 


ii fti 

11 . ol 


Ooi 


Ifi 99 
lO . LI 


Campers ..... 


17 


.46 


15 


.45 


Incendiary .... 


86 


2.30 


80 


2 42 


^liscellaneous .... 


1,306 


34.97 


1,170 


35.35 


Unknown . 


>>4 


23.67 


830 


25.08 


t 


3.735 


100 00 


3.310 


100 00 



Raxleoad Fires of 1925 



Railroad 


Mileage 


Number 
of Loco- 
motives 


Number 
of Fires 


Acreage 
burned 


Cost to 
extinguish 


Damage 


New York, New 












Haven k Hartford 


1,883 


922 


495 


3,621 


$5,763 


$12,465 


Boston <fc Albany . 


979 


354 


76 


1,134 


1,120 


3,466 


Boston <fc Maine 


2,017 


1,025 


89 


1,073 


2,262 


18,445 


Central Vermont . 


71 


23 


10 


100 


146 


294 


H.T.andW. 


8 


7 


3 


79 


29 


53 



Totals . -. 4,958 2,331 673 6,007 $9,320 $34,723 

Report of the Superintendent of Moth Work 
Hon. Wm. A. L. Bazelet, Commissioner. 

Sir: — I have the honor to present a report of the gypsy and brown-tail moth work 
for the year 1925, to report on general conditions and to make suggestions for the 
future. I regret that I cannot make as encouraging a report as that of last year, 
for while in some parts of the state the gypsy moth is present in such small number* 
as to be negligible, in other parts of the state the gypsy moth has increased from 
25 per cent to 100 per cent in numbers, owing to apathetic attitude on the part 
of the local authorities, and reduced appropriations. Unfortunately, the Gover- 
nor's reference to the gypsy moth in his inaugural address was misinterpreted and 
quite generally towns failed to appropriate money for the necessary work. Th^ 
made it necessary in many cases to call upon that section of the law which enables 
us to use the Governor's warrant in forcing towns to expend funds for the sup- 
pression of the gypsy moth. 

The worst section in the state was on Cape Cod, where about 40,000 acres of 
woodland were defoliated, or partially stripped, but all the towns in the infested 
district with the exception of Winchendon, Ashbumham and Westminster, show aa 
increase in the infestation. 

This was only to be expected, as such conditions have always followed a partial 
cessation of the work. We warned that these results might be expected if work was 
neglected. If thorough work is not done north of Boston, just such conditions wii 
arise there as we now have on Cape Cod. 

Bad stripping of trees occurred in the following towns: Falmouth, Mashpee, 
Yarmouth, Dennis, Brewster, Harwich and Chatham. 

I cannot urge too strongly that the authorities in towns and cities have these 
serious conditions brought to their notice. I recommend that a campaign of 
information be carried on that no town or city may fall back upon a plea of igno- 
rance of conditions, should more serious infestations arise in the future. 

Contrary to the general idea, the brown-tail moth is still present, but it is only 
in a few towns that an increase showed this year. These towns are Clinton, Fitch- 
burg, Groton, Lunenburg, West Boj-lston, Worcester, Wakefield and the Plum 
Island section in Essex County. 

I have receiv ed a report from each of the division superintendents giving in detail 
the conditions in their towns, and my statements are fully confirmed by the reports. 



P.D. 73 19 
Little help was received from the parasites this last year, the diminution in the 
number of gypsy moths for two years previous having depleted the ranks of the 
parasites very noticeably. This is in accordance with the natural law which these 
creatures follow. A lessening in the number of hosts always causes a corresponding 
lessening in the number of parasites. For details, I refer you to the report of 
A. F. Burgess of the United States Department of Agriculture, which is incorporated 
in this report later. 

The co-operative work on the North Shore has proceeded as usual this year, 
Beverly and Manchester co-operating with Col. Sohier's committee in furnishing 
part of the money for the work. There is a slight increase in the gypsy moth infes- 
tation in the woodland this year. We give herewith a financial statement of the 
North Shore Fund. 

Financial Statement 
Special North Shore Fund 
Receipts 

Balance from 1924 ..... 
State Forester ..... 
Wm. D. Sohier, Agent .... 
City of Beverly ..... 
Town of Manchester ... 
State Forester (for work done) 



$829 35 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
165 37 



$6,994 72 



Expenditures 

Pay roll $3,929 87 

Travel 48 20 

Stationery and postage ...... 2 59 

Telephone 59 58 

Supplies 1,150 03 

Sundries 9 01 

Rent . 650 00 5,849 28 



Balance, November 30, 1925 .... $1,145 44 

Though we are not charged in any way with the suppression of any insects but 
the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth, I wish to call your attention to the in- 
crease in the numbers of the elm-leaf beetle this last season. It is now very preva- 
lent again, especially in the Cape Cod district. In most of these towns the spraying 
of the state highways, which was done by this department for the Highway Divi- 
sion, was sufficient to take care of both the gypsy moth and the elm-leaf beetle. 

The satin moth, a recent importation to this country, is spreading very rapidly. 
The only two trees which they are known to attack are the willow and the poplar, 
but in some towns these trees were entirely stripped. 

The orchard tent caterpillar and the fall web worm which are often mistaken for 
the gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth, were prevalent this year, the latter being 
particularly abundant. 

The report of the United States Department of Agriculture, which is charged 
with the work of propagating and disseminating parasites, and with the work of 
preventing the spread of the gypsy moth all over New England, follows. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George A. Smith, Superintendent of Moth Work. 



Federal Gipsy Moth Work in Massachusetts 
By A. F. Burgess 

Careful scouting and clean-up work in Berkshire County, which comprises that 
portion of the barrier zone which lies in Massachusetts, has been carried on during 
the past year by the United States Bureau of Entomology. Conditions in this 
county have improved and a material decrease in infestation has resulted from the 
clean-up and spraying work of the previous year. Fewer infestations were found 
in the spring of 1925, and these were thoroughly treated and spraying applied 
during the summer. 



20 P.D. 73 

The inspection of products likely to carry the gypsy moth has been continued, and 
the amount of material shipped outside the area quarantined for the gypsy moth 
has increased slightly during the year. The volume of Christmas trees and greens, 
including ever gree n boughs, laurel, etc., cut for holiday and other decorations, is 
much greater than during any previous year, and the amount of inspection work 
required to safeguard this material which is being shipped to points outside New 
England, increased considerably. 

During the mimnw of 1925, three assistants from the gypsy moth laboratory 
were employed in Europe to secure and ship parasites to this country. Messrs. 
R. T. Webber and P. B. Dowden worked in Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Poland, 
while Mr. S. M. Dohanian carried on similar work in Spain and Portugal. During the 
early summer , Mr. T. H. Jones made a special trip to Europe to receive shipments that 
were aiiwnh lr d and bring them to thk country. This was necessary because the 
p a iaislen involved in these shipments required feeding and special attention en 
r ::f have p^risheo had :hey :eer. shipped ir. the crdhiary way. The 

result of the year's work in foreign countries has been satisfactory, and most of the 
im|MgUtiniM have arrived in this country in good condition. There are. however, 
a aaraber :: -;;e :rs ::' ryy>y aath parasites that are errrenaely ihhaah :■: ship :r 
colonize until more information can be secured concerning their life histories and 
habits. Work along these lines will be attempted during the coming year. 

. The work of collecting data on selected areas to determine the effect of defolia- 
tion on different species of trees has been continued. This project has been under 
way for more than ten years and the longer it is carried on the more valuable will 
be the information that is secured. In connection with this project, the large sample 
plots selected to test the ability of different forest stands to survive defoliation have 
been continued and the necessary data secured. 

Last year it was realized that the rate of parasitism had decreased slightly when 
compared with the previous year, and the statement was made that if this decrease 
continued, serious i niflifrrin of the insect might result. During the past summer 
hcavj drfoiht i nn has occurred on Cape Cod, where thousands of acres of trees have 
been completely denuded In other sections of the state, the infestation, based on 
ftennmber of cj^ cloatereionnd n» th e f u ll , h*s, increased sharply and there has been 
a derided falling off in parasitism. The situation at present is critical and it is 
impossible to predict whether the gypsy moth will increase and heavy damage result, 
or whether parasites will become more abundant and bring about a reduction in 
infills lion. It is impossible to predict just what will happen, but every effort 
should be made to prevent further increase of the insect. 

Data seemed last year indicated that the parasitism of the brown-tail moth had 
been reduced, m a nriiliat AMnMigh full information is not at hand at the present 
time, the reports thus far received indicate that the insect is more abundant this 
year than daring the previous year, and unless effective control measures are em- 
ployed, some df folhiliiiii is likely to result during the rrwir'C year. 



P.D. 73 



APPENDIX 



21 



Financial Statement 



Receipts and Expenditures for Year ending November 30, 1925 



Jrurpose of Appropriation 


Amount 


Refunds 

and 
Balances 


Expenc 
tures 


i- 


Balance 
to 1926 


Balance to 
Treasury 


Salary of Commissioner 


$6,000 


— 


$6,000 


00 


— 


— 


Personal Service ..... 


11,000 


- 


10,297 


13 


- 


$702 87 


Expenses of Commissioner 


250 


— 


100 


59 


— 


149 41 


Office Incidentals .... 


5,100 


$102 74 


3,503 


02 


— 


1,699 72 


General Forestry and Nurseries 


13,000 


— 


10.12S 


91 


— 


2,871 09 


Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands . 


10,000 


— 


8,313 


52 


— 


1,686 48 


Prevention of Firest Fires 


57,000 




56,999 


98 




02 


Federal Forestry Fund 




10,242 76 


8,561 


08 


$1,681 68 




Protection against Forest Fires 


1,000 


1,081 80 


2,075 


56 




6 24 


Reimbursement for Fighting Fires 








I O 






Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-tail 














Moths ...... 


60,000 


48,413 32 


84,990 


06 


23,423 26 




Maintenance of State Forests 


25,000 


19 43 


25,014 


12 




5 31 


Purchase and Development of State 














Forests ...... 


150,000 


973 20 


144,268 


97 


6,704 23 




Maintenance of Mount Grace 


1,000 




982 


22 




17 78 


Maintenance of Standish Monument 


2,000 




1,987 


30 




12 70 


Repair of Standish Monument 


8,000 


2,500 00 


3,560 


66 


6,939 34 






$351,350 


$63,333 25 


$367,236 


87 


$38,748 51 


$8,697 87 



Receipts 



For ferns sold 
For sand sold 
For lumber sold 
For Christmas trees 
For eordwood scrld . 
For sale and rent of buildings 
For hay, fruit, etc. . 
For rent of camp sites 
For trees sold 

For books, cards, maps, etc. 
For redemption of lots 
For sale of products from reforestation lots 
For examinations .... 
For supplies for gypsy moth work 
For donations to North Shore Fund . 
For highway work .... 
For sale of discarded equipment 
For supplies for fire fighting 
For donations to cost of fire towers . 
For admissions to Standish Monument 
For interest on bank deposit 



$500 00 

21 00 
2,017 06 

155 70 
1,102 35 
288 67 
732 00 
884 00 
13,201 12 

22 20 
550 37 
205 00 

91 25 
21,764 32 
4.000 00 
38 25 
350 00 
2.709 03 
1.400 00 
951 60 
116 08 



$51,100 00 



22 P.D. 73 

Statement of Expenditures and Receipts ox State Forests for the Year 
ending November 30. 1925 



State Forest 


and 
Xur=er:« 


ueneral 
Upkeep, 
Fire lines. 
Roads 


Surveying, 
Titles, 
etc. 


Land 


Total 


Receipts 


Arthur Warton Swann . 




06 




03 


$59 


4S 






$1,332 


57 


$401 


40 


A «h hum ham 


148 


51 


2,998 


99 


5 


00 






6.10- 


50 


42 


00 


Barre .... 
BashBish . 










3 


15 


$1,167 


50 


1.170 


65 






Beartown 


552 


39 


2 


63 


2>S 


00 


2,625 


95 


3.468 


97 


30 


00 


Blandford . 










2,001 


85 






2.001 


85 






jZt 7 . *r . 














2,000 


00 


2.000 


00 






Clarksburg . 






63 


00 


14 


03 


2,001 


■ 


2,078 


92 






Coirain 






152 


00 


31 


03 


84 


00 


267 


03 


10 


00 


Conway 










35 


00 


130 


00 


165 


00 






Erring 

Harold Parker 


1.440 


65 


1352 


38 


1,157 


36 


457 


50 


4.907 


89 


237 


25 


221 


n 


2,873 


55 










3,095 


37 


566 


10 


Hawtey 










794 


70 






794 


70 


21 


00 


Hubbardston 
Leominster . 








5 


69 


144 


35 


150 


04 






Martha's Vinevard 


1.470 


66 


846 


82 


1,913 


81 


82 


50 


4.313 


79 






Mohawk Tnul 


618 


00 


1,521 


51 


116 


15 






2,255 


66 


705 


14 


Monroe 










741 


59 


1,403 


00 


2,144 


59 


25 


00 


Mount Grace 


135 


55 


895 


17 










1,030 


72 


150 


00 


Myle* Standish . 


2.364 


78 


6.023 


25 


7 


94 


213 


63 


8,609 


60 


949 


00 


Xorthfield . 










250 


29 






250 


29 






Oakham 










1 


39 


378 


00 


379 


39 


7 


00 


October Mountain 


3,106 


43 


7,311 


81 


65 


75 


225 


00 


10,708 


99 


335 


67 


Otis .... 










334 


98 


5,293 


60 


5,628 


58 






Otter River . 


3,332 


54 


4.089 


74 


2 


20 


225 


00 


7,649 


48 


604 


50 


Oxford 










1 


04 


143 


50 


144 


54 






Peru .... 










CUt 1 


54 






OA 1 


04 






Petersham 






41 


25 










41 


25 






Pittefield 


















— 








Sandisfield . 


671 


65 


55 


93 


480 


50 


3,396 


25 


4,604 


33 


105 


00 


Savoy Mountain . 


2,575 


96 


1,469 


79 


475 


05 






4,oJU 


on 




97 


Shawme 


1,796 


06 


5.858 


40 


81 


06 


6.011 


22 


13.746 


74 


96 


75 


Shutesbury ... 
Spencer 










379 


31 


486 


71 


866 


02 






32 


25 


261 


00 










293 


25 






Sutton 










183 


75 






183 


75 






Templeton 


























Tolland-Granville . 


318 


33 


2,676 


58 


174 


37 


4,900 


00 


8.069 


28 


200 


00 


Warwick 










366 


24 


1.823 


00 


2,189 


24 






Wendell 
Westminster 


752 


51 


525 


25 


166 


88 


1,582 


00 


3.026 


64 






Windsor 


102 


00 










3,942 


00 


4,044 


00 


105 


00 


Worthington 


310 


« 






214 


01 






524 


66 






Unassigned . 














730 


00 


730 


00 






Totals . 


$20,317 80 


$40,425 08 


$11,313 


14 


$39,446 60 


$111,502 62 


$5,700 78 



The Distributiox of Supplies 

Supplies have been furnished to towns and cities for gypsy moth work as usual. 
The amounts given below do not correspond with the amount of aid given to the 
municipalities, as some towns make payment to the state for all or a part of the 
bill for supplies, according to the amount of their net expenditure and their class, 
under the provisions of section 4, chapter 132 of the General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement and for expenditures, see 
table on page 23. 



List of Towxs and Amouxts of Supplies Furnished for 1925 



Acton . 


$12 13 


Brewster 


$380 27 


Ashburnham . 


221 34 


Burlington 


378 72 


Ashby . 


335 29 


Carlisle . 


288 10 


Ashland 


2 10 


Dennis . 


309 13 


Bedford 


382 78 


Dracut . 


565 21 


Berkley . 


251 44 


Dunstable 


144 56 


Berlin 


231 00 


Duxbury 


60 69 


Bolton . 


353 21 


Eastham 


328 05 


Boxborough . 


334 89 


Essex 


221 07 


Boxford 


1,099 31 


Freetown 


382 85 


Boylston 


122 21 


Georgetown . 


1,387 43 



P.D. 73 

Groveland 
Halifax . 
Hanover 
Hanson . 
Harvard 
Harwich 
Holbrook 
Holden . 
Hopkinton 
Hubbardston 
Kingston 
Lakeville 
Littleton 
Lunenburg 
Lynnfield 
Mashpee 
Merrimac 
Middleton 
Newbury 
Norfolk 
North Reading 
Norwell 
Orleans . 
Pembroke 
Pepperell 
Plainville 



99 
73 



$202 18 
527 06 
282 06 
423 85 
529 98 
575 27 
261 74 
142 87 
318 76 
1 81 

41 
380 
832 88 
516 78 
523 08 
586 51 

85 08 
201 35 
514 54 
188 11 

20 19 
448 27 
400 37 
1,688 20 

16 65 
218 28 



Plympton 
Princeton 
Raynham 
Rochester 
Rowley . 
Salisbury 
Sandwich 
Sherborn 
Shirley . 
Sterling 
Stow . 
Sturbridge 
Sudbury 
Tewksbury 
Townsend 
Truro 

Tyngsborough 
Wayland 
Wellfleet 
West Boylston 
West Bridgewater 
West Newbury 
Westminster . 
Wilmington . 
Yarmouth 



Automobile supplies 
General Forestry and Nurseries 
Maintenance of State Forests 
Special North Shore Fund 
Prevention of Forest Fires . 
Purchase and Development of State Forests 
Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands . 
Storehouse Equipment 
Traveling Sprayers and Highways 



23 

$283 63 
276 27 
258 74 
142 33 

1,546 04 

1,233 98 
408 10 
386 74 
1 80 
212 89 

1,598 41 
1 81 
367 41 
527 07 
339 21 
38 50 
69 18 
1 95 
187 70 
278 14 
661 28 

1,401 91 
105 77 
679 42 
453 42 

$29,182 07 

SI. 293 57 
202 55 
361 81 
677 90 
1,261 78 
782 05 
12 16 
15 38 
83 81 



84,691 01 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and Cities 

for the Year 1925 





1925 


1926 


Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 














State 




Abington 


$2,325 08 












$2,681 55 


Acton . 


1,088 65 








$12 13 




1,269 39 


Acushnet 


1,417 76 












1,849 38 


Adams 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Agawam 


2,363 96 












3,421 15 


Alford . 


110 60 












138 59 


Amesbury 


4,729 57 












5,000 00 


Amherst 


3,256 24 












4,262 74 


Andover 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Arlington 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Ashburnham 


722 80 


$804 18 


$56 25 


$81 38 


221 34 


$302 72 


842 92 


Aahby . 


497 26 


724 80 


*280 88 


227 54 


335 2.9 


562 83 


556 30 


Ashfield 


458 71 












583 00 


Ashland 


939 80 








2 10 




1,274 59 


Athol . 


4.762 04 












5,000 00 



* Lead sold. 



24 P.D. 7: 





1925 


1926 


Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Expendi- 
tures 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 
















State 




Attleboro 


$5,000 


00 












$5,000 00 


Auburn 


1,137 


48 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




1,942 35 1 


Avon . 


617 


94 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,039 48 


Ayer . 


1,347 


47 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1,570 76 


Barnstable . 


4,409 


96 


— 


— 




— 




5,000 00 




1,652 


06 


— 


— 


■ 


— 




2,438 27 


Becket 


415 


93 












448 73 1 


Bedford 


1,033 


98 


COOO RO J 

«yyy oy \ 


$879 28 
*74 70 


I 


•009 70 
Coo - 1 


«oio oy 


1,249 82 


Belchertown 


533 


00 


- 










884 87 1 


Bellingham . 


703 


56 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,065 49 ! 


Belmont . 


5,000 


00 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


\ nnn nn 


Berkley 


302 


91 


382 49 


108 00 


$79 58 


251 44 


331 02 


397 43 


Berlin . 


374 


13 


( 

474 13{ 


59 20 
*68 00 


} 100 00 


231 00 


331 00 


431 37 ! 


Bernardston 


320 


18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


405 66 


Beverly 


5,000 


00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Billerica 


3,258 


25 


- 


- 


— • 


- 


- 


4,083 21 


Til Q^L'Qtnnp 


909 


32 


- 


— 


— 


— 




1,270 90 


Blandford 


404 


68 












520 09 


Bolton 


412 


60 


A<3A 71 i 


11 50 
*127 60 


j 22 11 


353 21 


375 32 


418 54 


Boston 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Bourne 


2,660 


78 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,900 66 


Boxborough 


145 


16 


- 


- 


- 


334 89 


- 


145 00 


Boxford 


461 


11 


431 37 


112 33 


- 


1,099 31 


1,069 57 


458 91 


Boylston 


292 


15 


122 14| 


197 31 
*43 35 


\ 
1 


122 21 




341 05 


Braintree 


5,000 


00 


i} W ' .i 


— 


— 


— 


- 


5,000 00 


Brewster 


478 


20 


739 87 | 


441 36 
*19 52 


| 261 67 


380 27 


641 94 


655 35 


Bridgewater 


2,331 


21 


— 




— 


— 


~ j 1 


3,186 79 


Brimfield 


459 


91 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


606 48 


Brockton 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Brookfield 


521 


70 


255 29 


44 15 


_ 


- 


- 


693 70 


Brookline 


5,000 


00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


5,000 00 


Buckland 


1,078 


41 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,333 28 


Burlington . 


614 


51 


198 15 


204 25 


— 


378 72 


— 


754 54 


Cambridge . 


5,000 


00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Canton 


3,288 


10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,941 46 


Carlisle 


253 


49 


253 49 | 


269 71 
*57 00 


\ 
/ 


288 10 


288 10 


270 00 


Carver 


935 


98 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


1,291 63 


Charlemont . 


374 


68 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


476 76 


Charlton 


826 


29 


— 


— 


- 


— 


- 


1,012 88 


Chatham 


1,350 


40 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


1,865 34 


Chelmsford . 


2,857 


90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,394 04 


Chelsea 


5,000 


00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Cheshire 


509 


13 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


677 02 


Chester 


508 


08 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


695 59 


Chesterfield . 


195 


48 


194 25 


— 


— 


- 


— 


231 79 


Chicopee 


5,000 


00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Chilmark 


192 


34 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


210 37 


Clarksburg 


361 


75 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


587 44 


Clinton 


5,000 


00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


5,000 00 


Cohasset 


2,903 


15 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,835 91 


Colrain 


710 


74 


- 


- 


- 


■ - 


- 


999 85 


Concord 


3,239 


50 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,783 74 


Conway 


437 


26 


- 


- 


- 


- 


■ 


448 08 


Cummington 


194 


10 












243 34 


Dalton 


2,381 


29 


z 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,387 57 


Dana . 


264 


59 


163 92 


37 08 


- 


- 


- 


361 68 


Danvers 


4,056 


57 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Dartmouth . 


3,465 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,856 57 


Dedham 


5,000 


00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


OOO 00 

OjVAAJ \J\J 


Deerfield 


1.945 


26 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,267 38 


Dennis 


712 


60 


940 25 { 


480 10 
♦73 60 


| 227 65 


309 13 


536 78 


890 44 


Dighton 


1,485 


43 


- 




- 


- 


- 


1,959 46 


Douglas 


852 


51 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


997 02 


Dover . 


1,367 


51 












1,491 97 


Dracut . . 


1,539 


22 


1 017 A'i 


7nn no 
/ uu uu 


07c 91 


565 21 


943 42 


2 427 04 


Dudley 


1,728 


31 












2^827 39 


Dunstable 


280 


85 


377 31 { 


140 10 
♦103 95 


} 96 46 


144 56 


241 02 


279 94 


Duxbury 


1,767 


68 








60 69 




2,202 50 


East Bridgewater . 


1,891 


67 












2,227 03 


East Brookfield 


364 


50 












503 08 



* Lead sold. 



P.D. 73 25 





1925 


1926 


Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 














State 




East Longmeadow 


$891 40 












$1,427 42- 


Eastham 


OQ1 OA 

zoi Z4 


*Q/1Q ne; 
♦040 UO 


tofiQ nn 
*zoy uu 


COl Ol 


4QOQ n^ 
OO/B UO 


•OOQ OC 

$ooy oo 


376 42 


Easthampton 


c nnn nn 
o.uuu uu 












5,000 00 


Easton 


o QQ^ on 
z,oyo yu 












3,056 34 


Edgartown . 


7QO ofi 

4 yo oo 












1,223 10 


Egremont 


OOO 1U 












391 66 


Enfield 


337 34 












347 74 


Erving 


946 93 












1,689 07 


Essex . 


622 21 


361 19 


731 00 




221 07 




632 14 


Everett 


k nnn on 












5,000 00 


Fairhaven 


"i fiR"i A.** 
o,UOO 40 












5,000 00 


Fall River . 


o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


Falmouth 


A fLQA fin 

4,004 ou 












5,000 00 


Fitchburg 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Florida 


595 13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


669 98 


Foxborough . 


1,515 62 


— 




— 


— 


— 


2,002 80 


Framingham 


k nnn nn 

o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


Franklin 


0,UO< 












4,184 79 


Freetown 


048 OO 


7 AO QQ 

/ 4z oy 


ooq nn 
zyo uu 


94 01 


ooz oo 


476 86 


902 21 


Gardner 


c nnn nn 

o,uuu UU 












5,000 00 


Gay Head 


Jo 0/ 












40 30 


Georgetown . 


639 00 


< 

689 91 

I 


570 30 

*q nn 
i) uu 


1 

50 91 

1 


1,387 43 


1,438 34 


873 57 


Gill . 


321 24 












403 92 


Gloucester . 


e nnn nn 
o,uuu UU 












5,000 00 


Goshen 


1 /1A 7Q 

144 t y 












169 27 


Gosnold 


421 63 












513 31 


Grafton 


2,635 47 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,208 53 


Granby 


466 38 












486 00 


Granville 


304 31 


311 75 


47 25 








339 73 


Great Barrington . 


4,307 32 






- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Greenfield 


5,000 00 


~ 


— 


— 




- 


5 000 00 


Greenwich . 


241 40 












281 82 


Groton 


1 AAA flQ 
1,441 UO 












1,779 15 


Groveland . 


,685 05 


i 

674 81 

\ 


octet on 
zyo zU 

*4Z 40 


} 


202 18 


191 94 


798 44 


Hadley 


1 0*70 QQ 

66 












1,737 89 


»- ■■' 
Halifax 


388 14 


441 62 j 


719 75 
*24 88 


J 53 48 


527 06 


580 54 


586 85 


Hamilton 


2,007 19 


— 


— 


— 


— 




2,183 02 


Hampden 


OOI 70 

zzi <y 












272 13 


Hancock 


192 99 












276 08 


Hanover 


1 ,U8y 89 


1 OOO EC 

l,z82 DO 


oil ~~ n b 

311 95 




ooo nc 
282 Oo 


ooo r\£? 

282 06 


1,467 79 


Hanson 


QftK 1 Q 

yuo 10 


863 87 


479 88 




423 85 


382 59 


1,116 18 


Hardwick 


1,496 87 




— 




— 




2,351 58 


Harvard 


867 47 


892 78 { 


18 80 
*ZZ8 so 


} 


529 98 


529 98 


927 84 


Harwich 


1 034 01 


1 9.07 QQ 
L,6£i OO 


1,106 25 


zyo Of 


575 27 


868 64 


1,400 07 


Hatfield 


1 230 41 












1,858 07 


Haverhill 


k nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


Hawley 


1 0A HQ 
1Z4 Oo 










_ 


124 31 


Heath . 


181 25 












201 05 


Hingham 


3,914 81 












5,000 00 


Hinsdale 


385 98 


- 


- 


- ! 


- 


- 


458 38 


Holbrook 


i niQ «o 
l,Ulo Oo 


1,014 65 


375 00 




261 74 


261 74 


1,436 43 


Holden 


1 1 fi°. 84. 
1,1 Do 04 


— 


~~ 




142 87 




1,356 24 


Holland 


on oo 
8Z OO 


41 75 


33 25 








108 37 


Holliston 


1 1 CO OO 

1,162 28 




_ 






— 


1,578 96 


Holyoke 


c nnn nn 

o,uuu UU 










— 


5,000 00 


Hopedale 


o,o4y 66 












3,552 96 


XT i • 

xlopkinton 


903 27 


363 82 { 


211 00 
*102 48 


} " 


318 76 


- 


1,205 67 


Hubbardston 


451 04 


599 51 


54 40 


148 47 


1 81 


150 28 


551 42 


Hudson 


2,929 63 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


3,702 91 


Hull 


r nnn nn 
0,UUU uu 


— 




— 


— 




5000 00 


Huntington 


500 68 


356 50 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7no fiQ 
/ uz oy 


[pswich 


2,871 41 


— 


- 


- 






3,899 02 


Kingston 


869 45 


1,123 67 


277 50 


254 22 


4 1 99 


296 21 


1,226 31 


T 1 11 

■Liakeville 


567 38 


926 76 ( 


222 55 
♦98 28 


} 359 38 


380 73 


740 11 


700 31 


Lancaster 


1,518 84 


I 










1,530 56 


Lanesborough 


407 78 












593 04 


Lawrence 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Lee 


2,311 81 












2,739 24 


Leicester 


1,679 19 












2,126 21 


Lenox . 


3,079 43 












3,170 37 


Leominster . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Leverett 


225 90 












247 62 



* Lead sold. 



26 P.D. 73 





1925 


1926 


Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 














State 




Lexington 


$4,395 32 


— 


— 


- 


- 


— 


$5,000 00 


Leyden 


141 11 


$175 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


146 29 


T i n/*ri1 n 


927 85 












1,410 60 


Littleton 


AQn 1 A 

oyu io 


acq on i 


$21 25 
*241 80 


i z 

J 


Wo. So 


tcoi no 


853 37 


Longmeadow 


2,367 34 


— 


— 




— 


— 


3,264 26 


.Lowell 


5,000 00 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Ludlow 


3,747 71 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4,432 07 


Lunenburg . 


7A.1 8-1 
1 Ol o-i 




530 60 
*278 36 


1 

) 


OlO / O 




825 72 


Lynn 


5,000 00 


- 


— 




— 


- 


^ onn oo 


T \m n fitful H 


869 87 


1,398 09 


569 50 


$528 22 


523 08 


1,051 30 


1 162 73 


^1 alden 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


^lancbester 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


^lansfield 


2,837 24 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


4^542 62 


-uai uicucou . • 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


t'ooo no 


Clarion 


1,486 54 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,940 36 


^I&rlborough 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5*000 00 


^larshfield 


1,354 29 


— 






— 


— 


2^068 19 


\f q a Vl r»PP 


242 70 


838 45 


352 00 


595 75 


586 51 


1,182 26 


309 42 


^lat t apOlSet t 


947 30 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,326 19 


yi ay ' . ■■- T' i . 


2,527 51 


- 


— 


— 


- 


— 


4^230 12 




964 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 282 77 


Medford 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


- 


- 


— 


5)000 00 


\f pH tTQV 


1,101 94 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


L478 11 


\fplrf\QP 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5)000 00 


^lendon 


376 02 


- 




- 


- 


- 


502 73 


\ f frrri m ft f* 

— - • • 


800 97 


803 63 


181 27 


— 


85 08 


85 08 


1,014 54 


\f p* on 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


t'ooo 00 


\f iddleborough 


2,936 92 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4,318 00 


Middlefield 


140 94 


— 


— 


- 


— 


- 


145 10 


"^liddleton 


481 36 


360 11 


210 95 


— 


201 35 


— 


681 49 


1*1111 L/l VA . 


5,000 00 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


\f i 1 1 Vmit*v 

.▼llllUUlj . • 


2,189 15 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3)086 71 


Millis 


1,038 34 


— 


- 


— 


- 


— 


L438 02 


»»X 111 V .11 C • 


668 31 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


L035 71 


^lilton 


5.000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5)000 00 


^lonroe 


239 14 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


419 10 


Nlonson 


1,079 54 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,699 76 


\f An t ii oniP 


4,574 48 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


\f f^ntprpv 

*»1UL1 LCI Cjr 


232 76 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


321 92 


\fnntcrnmprv 

J. Ull L £ LI U1C1 JT 


100 35 


48 65 


— 


— 


— 


— 


107 27 


\f mint W" QcViincrfr^n 


90 27 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


90 96 


^^£kll£int . • 


2,091 84 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,354 33 


Nantucket • • 


2,472 30 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5)862 23 




5,000 00 


— 


— 


■ 


— 




5)000 00 




4,934 64 












5)000 00 


Ashford 


48 54 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


60 61 


New Bedford 


5,000 00 


— 


- 


— 


- 


— 


5,000 00 


New Braintree 


231 64 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


265 92 


New Marlborough . 


641 09 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


ill -rt 


New Salem 


246 44 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


340 11 


Newbury 


1 ACQ 


i aaa no J 
l.UOO IW^ 


793 35 
*393 90 


t 
/ 


DM O-t 


491 04 


1,191 92 


^PtcKnrvnnrf 


5,000 00 


— 


— 




— 


— 


5,000 00 




5,000 00 


— 


— 


- 


— 


- 


5,000 00 


Norfolk '. '. 


629 89 


809 30 


279 05 


179 41 


188 11 


367 52 


829 40 


f\rt Y\ AHftTTkQ 
~> KJl L 11 J^KAaLLLzS 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


^CcwtVi AnHnvpr 

aIUI til AliUUVCl 


4,173 28 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4,760 94 


^^orth Attleborougb 


4,210 31 


- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


5)000 00 


N^orth Brookfield 


1,074 89 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,516 56 


N^orth Reading 


655 87 


621 35 


402 55 


- 


20 19 


- 


826 46 


N ortbamj)ton . 


5,000 00 




— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


orthborough 


889 14 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


953 83 


N ort bbri dge . 


4,949 85 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


- ' Ul lilLiCill • • 


760 15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


l)lll 38 


nrtnn 

H 'J l LUll • . 


936 11 


— 




— 


— 


— 


1,424 37 






[ 


751 50 


1 








I orw ell 


642 47 


1,144 98 \ 


*10 08 


\ 502 51 


448 27 


950 78 


810 99 






\ 


f200 00 


1 






5,000 00 


*n or^ ooo . • 


5,000 00 








- 


- 




1,226 88 












l)762 41 


Oaknam 


193 67 


231 11 


173 41 


37 44 




37 44 


217 70 


Orange 


2,328 56 












3,127 79 


Orleans 


698 50 


1,158 80 


481 34 


460 30 


400 37 


860 67 


1,572 13 


Otis . 


177 12 












236 88 


Oxford 


1,190 82 












1,725 64 



* Lead sold, f Elm beetle work. 



P.D. 73 



27 



Cities and Towns 


1925 


1926 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Palmer 


$4,605 41 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


$5,000 00 


Paxton 


240 95 


$80 10 


$48 16 


— 


— 


— 


421 16 


Peabody 


5,000 00 




— 


- 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Pelham 


253 76 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


291 95 


Pembroke 


634 63 


1,439 54 


391 40 


$804 91 


$1,688 20 


$2,493 11 


1,068 59 


Pepperell 


1,349 54 


— 


— 


— 


16 65 


— 


1,783 55 


Peru 


110 48 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


167 42 


Petersham 


618 14 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


824 07 


Phillipston . 


165 17 


109 05 


42 00 


- 


- 


_ 


203 40 


Pittsfield 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Plainfield 


124 48 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


180 31 


Plainville 


751 24 


1,071 99 


68 00 


320 75 


218 28 


539 03 


807 11 


Plymouth 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Plympton 


261 37 


619 73 


183 70 


358 36 


283 63 


641 99 


361 99 


Prescott 


130 99 


91 00 


121 50 


— 


— 


— 


151 65 


Princeton 


505 54 




— 


— 


276 27 


_ 


603 93 


Provincetown 


1,683 30 


_ 


_ 


— 




_ 


2,067 01 


Quincy 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


_ 


5,000 00 


Randolph 


1,412 96 


- 


— 


- 


- 


_ 


1,860 01 


Raynham 


580 95 


534 28 


339 25 


— 


258 74 


212 07 


859 27 


Reading 


4,221 89 




- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Rehoboth 


703 28 












929 27 


Revere 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Richmond . 


269 50 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


381 30 


Rochester 


515 84 


515 84 


_ 


— 


142 33 


142 33 


640 19 


Rockland 


3,103 36 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,970 00 


Rockport 


2,055 83 




— 


- 




- 


2,282 93 


Rowe . 


142 58 


162 55 










175 56 


Rowley 


531 27 


l ni7 fin/ 


402 59 
♦117 60 


\ filS 8R 


1 546 04 


2 159 90 


586 03 


Royalston 


508 85 












645 44 


Russell 


1,481 77 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,533 48 


xvutianci 


492 11 


389 27 


149 95 


_ 


_ 


_ 


004 0/ 


Salem . 


5,000 00 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Salisbury 


1,062 69 


i 

1,103 83< 


371 02 
*15 75 


> 41 14 


1,233 98 


1,275 12 


1,222 22 


Sandisfield . . . 


220 85 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


300 59 


Sandwich 


718 47 


1,170 o2< 


97 05 
*107 40 


\ 

> 4ol 8o 


408 10 


859 9o 


1,088 36 


Saugus 


3,615 83 


— 




_ 


— 


_ 


4,572 32 


Savoy . 


114 40 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


131 07 


Scituate 


3,150 24 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4,401 05 


Seekonk 


1,096 24 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,775 15 


Sharon 


1,651 94 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,222 03 


Sheffield 


664 63 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


664 61 


onelburne 


1,039 02 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,338 08 


Sherborn 


813 47 


1,389 40 


398 01 


17 73 


386 74 


404 47 


729 26 


Shirley 


992 28 


992 21 


156 14 




1 80 


1 73 


1,244 44 


Shrewsbury . 


2,069 06 


_ 




— 


_ 


— 


2,509 55 


Shutesbury . 


180 98 


125 25 


27 25 


_ 


_ 


_ 


193 56 


Somerset 


1,245 93 


- 




- 


- 


- 


2,035 39 


Somerville . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 




- 


— 


5,000 00 


South Hadley 


2,542 59 












3,362 54 


Southampton 


329 42 


101 25 


30 50 


_ 


_ 


_ 


403 02 


Southborough 


1,373 10 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


1,50/ oo 


Southbridge . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Southwick . 


629 81 


— 


— 


— 




— 


927 80 


Spencer 


1,772 59 












2,148 01 


Springfield . 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Sterling 


638 80 


510 6l( 


12 49 
*158 80 


} - 


212 89 


84 70 


712 88 


Stockbridge . 


2,433 19 






> 


_ 


_ 


2,514 39 


Stoneham , 


3,294 15 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4,372 54 


Stoughton . 


2,655 28 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,469 49 


Stow . 


681 68 


i 

995 90 < 


45 50 
* 358 35 


> 314 22 


1,598 41 


1,912 63 


834 30 


Sturbridge . 


559 55 


427 59 


131 55 


_ 


1 81 


_ 


721 72 


Sudbury 


949 06 


821 96 ( 


320 00 
*88 15 




367 41 


240 31 


983 40 


Sunderland . 


426 06 












644 64 


Sutton 


942 75 












1,058 32 


Swampscott . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Swansea 


952 26 












1,513 48 


Taunton 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Templeton . 


1,354 47 












1,903 53 


Tewksbury . 


1,270 39 


1,821 00 


615 07 


550 61 


527 07 


1,077 68 


1,480 27 


Tisbury 


1,038 03 












1,824 75 



* Lead sold. 



28 



P.D. 73 





1925 


1926 


Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
tures 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 

from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


















State 




Tolland 


$151 


22 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


$191 47 


Topsfield 


1,196 


62 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


1,279 56 


Townsend 


912 


39 


$1,017 37 


$324 


17 


$104 98 


$339 21 


$444 19 


1,121 61 


Truro . 


285 


94 


629 89 


49 


00 


343 95 


38 50 


382 45 


410 28 


Tyngsborough 


413 


76 


840 54 


23 


00 


426 78 


69 18 


495 96 


567 81 


Tyringham . 


201 


43 














223 24 


Upton . 


653 


02 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


669 88 


Uxbridge 


2,863 


14 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


3,965 12 


Wakefield 


5,000 


00 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Wales . 


177 


56 


- 






- 


- 


- 


227 00 


Walpole 


o,o< O 


nn 
uu 


_ 






1 _ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Waltham 


5,000 


00 


- 






- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Ware . 


3,271 


36 


— 






— 


- 


— 


4,741 57 


Wareham 


3,516 


97* 


- 






- 


- 


- 


4,904 70 


Warren 


1,939 


81 


- 






- 


- 


- 


2,640 13 


Warwick 


235 


25 














263 43 


Washington . 


144 


54 


z 






z 


_ 


_ 


116 88 


Watertown . 


5,000 


00 


- 






- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Wayland 


1,733 


70 


- 






- 


- 


- 


1,958 77 


Webster 


5 000 


00 














5,000 00 


Wellesley 


5^000 


00 


- . 








- 


- 


5,000 00 


Wellfleet 


424 


25 


743 Oil 


178 
*2 


15 
88 


J 318 76 


187 70 


506 46 


505 77 


Wendell 


403 


79 


- 






- 


- 


- 


512 14 


Wenham 


1,291 


66 














1,364 56 


West Boylston 


556 


64 


i 

319 02< 


218 
*101 


65 
40 


J ~ 


278 14 


40 52 


685 16 


West Bridgewater . 


895 


45 


1,494 97 < 


810 

1 / 


15 
to 


> 599 52 


661 28 


1 nan oa 

1,260 80 


1 140 72 


West Brookfield . 


570 


45 


_ 






_ 


_ 


— 


681 92 


West Newbury 


472 


22 


t 

545 97 < 


190 
*69 


50 
00 


\ 

> 73 75 


1,401 91 


1,475 66 


485 02 


West Springfield . 


5,000 


00 


- 






- 


— 




5,000 00 


West Stockbridge . 


400 


68 














594 07 


West Tisbury 


272 


81 


z 






_ 


_ 


_ 


366 92 


Westborough 


1,659 


34 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


1 762 81 


Westfield 


5,000 


00 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


5!(K)0 00 


Westford 


1,929 


04 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


2,442 46 


Westhampton 


149 


47 


91 30 


140 
*121 


15 

05 


_ 


_ 


— 


172 93 


"Westminster 


520 


63 


325 55/ 




105 77 


— 


584 29 


Weston 


2,585 


58 


_ 








_ 


- 


O Af\A G£l 

3,494 06 


Westport 


1,984 


97 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


2,712 62 


Westwood . 


1,241 


34 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


1,671 13 


Weymouth . 


5,000 


00 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Whately 


433 


39 


•_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


COQ OA 

008 zO 


Whitman 


2,862 


98 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


3,729 78 


Wilbraham . 


1,129 


34 


_ 






_ 


_ 


- 


1,616 38 


Williamsburg 


646 


08 


_ 






_ 


_ 


— 


841 61 


Williamstown 


2,510 


54 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


3,126 96 


Wilmington . 


1,058 


48 


1,250 19 


673 


67 


191 71 


679 42 


871 13 


1,277 65 


Winchendon 


2,565 


40 










— 


— 


one oa 
3,295 34 


Winchester . 


5,000 


00 


- 






- 






5,000 00 


Windsor 


171 


37 










_ 




202 69 


Winthrop 


5,000 


00 














c nnn nn 

5,000 00 


Woburn 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Worcester 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


W orthington ■ 


226 


15 














268 48 


Wrentham . 


877 


50 














1,276 22 


Yarmouth 


1,041 


58 


977 24 


114 


00 




453 42 


389 08 


1,291 56 



* Lead sold. 




Jl c L :2 t 

Public Document No. 73 

Commontoealtf) of ftlagKacfjusetw 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Commissioner of Conservation 



AND 



State Forester 



FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1926 
. Department of Conservation 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
1,600. 2-'27. Order 8123. C, 

K 



CONTENTS 



PAG 



Conservation of Forests 

Conservation of Domestic Animals 

Conservation of Wild Life 

Standish Monument Reservation 

State Forests I 

Recommendations, Division of Animal Industry 

Recommendations, Division of Fisheries & Game ( 

Division of Forestry, Report £ 

Organization 

State Plantations 

Forest Survey 

Extension Forestry 

Woodlot Examinations 1C 

Lectures k 

Field Trips 10 

Exhibits 10 

Blister rust Work 11 

Nurseries 11 

State Forests 12 

Report of Forester in Western Massachusetts 14 

Report of the State Fire Warden 21 

Report of the Superintendent of Moth Work 26 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts 27 

Appendix; Financial Statements 29 



OUTLINE OF REPORT 

This report is divided for convenience and economy into four parts: — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of Con- 
servation. 

Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 

Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume as Public Document No. 73. 
Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 25. 
Part IV is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 98. 



S7f^ 

tEfje Commontoealtfr bf jfflagaacfjuaetts 

Part I 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CONSERVATION 

The annual report of the Department of Conservation is herewith sub- 
mitted. During the past year twenty-six meetings of the Commissioner 
and directors were held at which policies were discussed and decided, 
takings of land approved and rules and regulations voted upon. The 
records of these meetings are filed in the office. 

We have co-operated with the United States Department of Agriculture, 
receiving federal aid under the Clarke-McNary Act in forest fire work 
and in nursery work. We have co-operated with the State Departments 
of Health and Agriculture, in control of tuberculosis in cattle and in con- 
trol of white pine blister rust respectively, and with private associations 
also. 

Forest Conservation. 

On Tuesday, April 20, 1926, the United States Congress adopted an or- 
der which provided that on the following Thursday the entire time of the 
House of Representatives should be devoted to a discussion of the general 
subject of conservation of forests. One has only to read the earnest and 
eloquent remarks made by many of the recognized leaders of Congress 
on that occasion as printed in the Congressional Record to become fully 
convinced that it is absolutely essential to our future well-being that we 
enter upon and maintain with unabated vigor a forestry program which 
shall include the care and wise use of the forests that remain, as well as 
reclaiming by reforestation as far as practicable the millions of acres of 
now idle and unproductive lands. 

To those, who because of insufficient information concerning the sub- 
ject, believe that forestry is simply a beautiful dream of the sentimental- 
ists we would call attention to the words found in a proclamation of Presi- 
dent Coolidge last March when he said, "Too long have we as a nation 
consumed our forest wealth without adequate provision for its wise util- 
ization and renewal." 

It has now become a generally recognized fact that the damage which 
was ruthlessly committed by the unscientific and short-sighted lumbering 
operations of the past will require many years to repair. However, I am 
happy to express the conviction that within a few years in spite of the 
short-sighted opposition of a few, a thoughtful and intelligent public in- 
terest has been aroused and that the great work of forest restoration will 
go on uninterruptedly until our forests of Massachusetts are rehabilitated. 

To no state in the Union is this question of more vital importance than 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. History shows that within the 
memory of many people now living, Massachusetts produced from her own 
soil a sufficient amount of timber to meet the lumber demand of her 
varied industries while today more than 80% of the timber used is im- 
ported from outside the state. If during the time this timber was being 
cut and marketed, far-seeing legislators had made it obligatory that no 
trees be cut unless others were set out on the cut-over land, we should 
not now be facing such a situation. The forest policy started in 1919 will 
correct this condition, if it is persevered in, and in from twenty-five to 
forty years, Massachusetts should be in a position to cut approximately 
450 million feet of timber annually. This, whether cut from private 



4 



P.D. 73 



wood lots or from state-owned land, will do much to help her industries, 
which otherwise may find it hard to get the necessary supply of wood 
anywhere, and will also bring in a considerable income. 

If we want to point to an outstanding example of this kind of public 
reforestation, we cannot do better than look at Germany, with its won- 
derful state-owned forests. To an American traveller, Belgium, France 
and Italy look bare of forests. One can ride for miles without seeing a 
really good sample of forest. Switzerland and Germany on the other 
hand seem well-wooded. It certainly is forehanded, practical and econom- 
ical for the state to acquire waste land, plant it and thus build up a sup- 
ply of lumber and fire wood for future generations. In southern Europe 
every scrap of wood, no matter how small, is used for fire wood, and the 
burning of logs in open fireplaces is an unheard-of luxury, while here in 
New England we are still able to be prodigal with fires. If we do not 
want to come to the state where like "Mother Hubbard" of old, our cup- 
board will be bare, let us lay the foundation now for our future supply. 

Conservation of Domestic Animals. 

To protect the public health from the danger from contagious diseases 
among domestic animals is the function of the Division of Animal In- 
dustry. In order to have pure milk, sweet and wholesome meat, the herds 
of bovine animals must be inspected often, and kept clean from deterior- 
ating disease. Especially important is the detection and eradication of 
bovine tuberculosis. This disease is detected by the application of the 
tuberculin test to the herd. In this way, herds are cleaned and only 
healthy cows kept for business purposes. 

This work is only restricted by size of appropriations and, as it is 
vitally important to the public health, should be supported generously by 
the people. 

Owing to reported wide-spread frauds among cattle dealers, a situation 
of distrust in the Division of Animal Industry was created, and the Gov- 
ernor asked for the resignation of the Director, Dr. Lester H. Howard. 
This took effect on October 5, 1926. On November 6, Mr. Frank B. Cum- 
mings of Newton was appointed Director to fill vacancy. 

For the work in detail, I refer to the report of the Division of Animal 
Industry. 

Conservation of Wild Life. 

In previous reports we have discussed the possible conflicts that may 
arise, from time to time, in an attempt to maintain, on a given area, both 
a State Forest and a wild life sanctuary. It has been pointed out that 
certain conflicts will arise that would make it very difficult to fully ad- 
minister a given tract for both purposes. There is one possible field of 
development over which there is likely to be little conflict, if any at all. 
We refer to the development of the water resources on our State Forests 
for the propagation of fish life. The sites of old mill dams are to be 
found on some of our present forests, indicating that with a certain 
amount of construction work we can restore what were formerly sizeable 
ponds. In some of these instances the contour lines show, that if the 
dams are properly rebuilt it will be possible, from time to time, to draw 
all of the water out of the ponds, or, at least, down to the banks of any 
brook which may be a feeder supply. The presence of these artificial 
bodies of water within a State Forest will be of great value to forestry 
operations in supplying additional moisture to the forest in question. 
In time some of them may be valuable water supplies to fight fires on 
these forests and surrounding regions. They will also be a factor in 
beautifying the forests, which is always worth considering. 

We have in our State upwards of eight hundred and fifty great ponds. 
Practically all of them are stocked with the common pond fishes, namely, 
bass, pickerel, perch and horned pout. In this list only the small-mouth 



P.D. 73 



5 



black bass can be artificially propagated in any reasonable numbers, by 
any of the usual methods employed through the country. If we are going 
to keep up a reasonable stock of fish in these great ponds it will be neces- 
sary, from time to time, to substantially stock them with the above 
species. At present our only source of supply consists of one chain of 
artificial ponds in which these fish propagate naturally, and from which, 
annually, sorted young stock is taken for planting in waters open to pub- 
lic fishing. As time goes on, and funds are available, it should be en- 
tirely practicable to develop a number of these breeding ponds on the 
State Forests, where fish cultural work and forestry can be conducted 
to all-round advantage. The greatest utilization of our forests, consistent 
with keeping fire hazards at a minimum and without encroachment on the 
areas suitable for growing trees, is one of our objectives in handling 
these problems of the conservation of all our natural resources. 

Standish Monument Reservation. 

During the summer of 1926, a total of 100,720 persons visited the 
Standish Monument on Captain's Hill in the town of Duxbury. These 
visitors were from every state in the union and from many foreign coun- 
tries. 9,131 ascended the tower, paying to the state $913.10 for this 
privilege. 

Repairs on the statue of Captain Myles Standish were completed as 
per contract, but when the time came for replacing the new upper half 
of the statue on the lower half, still standing on top of the monument, 
it was decided by the experts in charge that the lower half of the statue 
had deteriorated and was badly cracked, and not in a suitable condition 
to stand the weight of the new upper half. After consultation, it was 
thought best to ask for a new appropriation to repair the lower part, and 
await the action of the legislature of 1927 in regard to this matter. As 
the construction is to last for many years, it seems wise that it should 
be done properly now. The new upper part is safely housed, awaiting 
the further action of the legislature. 

The need of a comfort station at this Reservation is still great. 

State Forests. 

The purchase of land has continued during the year. A total of 7,- 
353.6738 acres has been acquired. 
The land is distributed as follows: 



Name of Forest Acres 

Myles Standish ........ 35. 

Savoy Mountain ....... 200. 

Ashburnham 23. 

Conway 203. 

Foxborough 381.385 

Leominster ........ 645.775 

Martha's Vineyard 2,556. 

Mohawk Trail 22.5 

Monroe ........ 281. 

October Mountain 288.8 

Peru 528. 

Sandisfield 1,004.01 

Shawme 143.31 

Shutesbury ........ 59. 

Spencer ......... 205.125 

Sutton ......... 25. 

Templeton 290.74 

Warwick ......... 55.75 

Wendell 83.39 



6 



P.D. 73 



Westminster 289.8888 

Windsor 33. 

Acquired by exchange ...... 88. 



7,353.6738 

Division of Animal Industry. 

1. Salary of Director. Owing to the steady growth in the volume of 
business in this division, it is the opinion of the Commissioner that the 
director is not receiving a salary commensurate with his duties and re- 
sponsibilities. The Commissioner, therefore, recommends that the salary 
be increased. 

2. Amending the law relative to the tuberculin testing of cattle. Under 
the present law there is nothing to prevent a person acquiring cattle im- 
mediately prior to an application for a tuberculin test regardless of 
whether said person is the owner or not, or presenting cattle for test on 
premises other than those of said owner and thereby defeating the law 
the purpose of which is to maintain herds free from tuberculosis. 

The present amendment requires that the person applying for the test 
shall have owned the cattle on the premises where tested for sixty days 
or have added them to his herd on proper test. The amendment also 
provides that an application for a tuberculin test shall be signed by the 
owner only. These measures should help to prevent fraud against the 
Commonwealth. 

3. Amending the law relative to reimbursement by the Commonwealth 
for the slaughter of certain cattle affected with tuberculosis. During 
each of the past three years the Federal allotment for reacting cattle be- 
came exhausted. This exhaustion of funds apportioned by the Federal 
Government for payment to citizens of Massachusetts for cattle which 
react to a tuberculin test applied under the State and Federal co-operative ] 
agreement, deprives many Massachusetts cattle owners of Federal pay- 
ment for such cattle regardless of the fact that said owners may have 
complied with the rules and regulations under which this test is applied. 
Failure of such payment is a hardship for farmers or cattle owners who 
are attempting to maintain herds of cattle free from tuberculosis. This 
act would remedy the possible lack of Federal funds and encourage cattle 
owners in the continuance of this work, by enabling the Commonwealth 
to pay the share of the Federal Government, when their appropriation 
became exhausted. 

Division of Fisheries and Game. 

4. Salary of the Director. Owing to the steady growth in the volume 
of business in this division it is the opinion of the Commissioner that the 
Director is not receiving a salary commensurate with his duties and re- 
sponsibilities. The Commissioner, therefore, recommends that the salary 
be increased. 

5. An act to repeal the law relative to the training of hunting dogs. 
Under the present law dogs cannot be trained on any protected species of 
birds or game between March 1st and September 1st. This law does not 
prohibit the taking of fox hounds into the woods during this time (for 
the fox is given no protection by law), or other dogs under the guise of 1 
hunting unprotected game. It does not restrict the self-hunting mongrel ] 
dog which does a great deal of harm to birds and game. No practical 1 
scheme can be effected which would tend to keep all dogs out of the woods J 
during the time that game should be unmolested. Therefore, it is unfair 1 
to restrict the bird dog and the rabbit hound and allow other dogs, which J 
do more damage than any trained hunting dog, to run at will. 

6. An act relative to fishing in inland waters. Today no license is ] 
required to fish in inland waters not stocked subsequent to January 1, j 
1910. While the greater part of such waters have been so stocked, the 1 



P.D. 73 



7 



law requires the publication yearly of a list of stocked waters at the ex- 
pense of considerable effort and money for their compilation and publica- 
tion. If the Commonwealth has expended substantial sums to stock 
waters prior to January 1, 1910 from which our fishermen are now re- 
ceiving benefits, there is no logical reason for permitting these waters 
to be fished without the purchase of a license. This provision has cost 
the state many hundreds of dollars in loss of revenues from licenses ; has 
made law enforcement difficult; and, wrought much confusion among the 
fishermen, and it should be repealed. 

7. An act to permit the Department of Conservation to enlarge game 
farms and fish hatcheries. It was impossible to see years ago the de- 
sirability of enlarging some of our fish hatcheries and game farms. It 
is very possible in the future that desirable improvements at these sta- 
tions will be blocked by reason of hold-up prices which certain persons 
owning adjacent lands are now in a position to demand. Therefore, it 
is important that the Department be given the right to take by eminent 
domain land adjacent to these stations, if such land cannot be purchased 
at a reasonable price, and if the land is necessary to make any needed 
improvements and extensions, or to protect the natural resources of the 
present stations. 

8. An act relative to loch leven trout. While most people consider 
the brown and the loch leven trout to be one and the same fish, it is de- 
sirable to avoid any technicalities and to definitely state in the law that 
the loch leven trout shall receive the same protection as the brown trout 
now receives. Therefore, we recommend that the law be amended to give 
the loch leven trout specific protection. 

9. An act relative to blue gills and sun-fish. The Division has expended 
considerable money for the propagation of the blue gill and several ponds 
throughout the Commonwealth have been stocked with this species with 
gratifying results. Therefore, a reasonable closed season, a legal mini- 
mum length, and a daily catch limit should be provided for blue gills and 
all other sun-fish, in order that they may have a chance to establish them- 
selves in our waters. 



8 



P.D. 73 



Part II 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

The work of the Forestry Division is carried on in several sections, as 
follows: general forestry work, which includes educational work such as 
lecturing, preparing bulletins on forestry matters, forest survey of the 
state, examination of woodland with reports to owners, etc. ; nursery work, 
including care and extension of nurseries, removing trees for planting 
on state owned land, or for sale to private woodland owners ; reforestation 
work, that is, maintenance of lots deeded to the state under the so-called 
"reforestation act" (These lots when not redeemed at the end of ten 
years become the property of the state. There are many such state lots, 
and the work on them is described under the heading of "State Planta- 
tions") ; forest fire prevention ivork in charge of the State Fire Warden, 
the aim of which is to detect and check forest fires in their incipiency; 
gypsy moth suppression in charge of a superintendent who supervises the 
work done in the cities and towns of the state ; and the state forest work, 
both purchase and development of forest lands. This includes planting, 
thinning, road building, fire lines, surveying, establishing of forest nur- 
series, repair of buildings, leasing of camp sites, etc. 

These different lines of work have been prosecuted faithfully during 
the past year. 

Organization. 

William A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner and State Forester 
Charles 0. Bailey, Secretary 
Harold 0. Cook, Chief Forester 

D. C. A. Galarneau, Forester in Western Massachusetts 
Frank L. Haynes, Asst. Forester, Land Purchase 
James Morris, Asst. Forester, Nurseries 

Robert B. Parmenter, Asst. Forester, Mapping and Reforestation 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden 
George A. Smith, Moth Superintendent 
John P. Crowe, Asst. Fire Warden 



District Forest Wardens 

1. James E. Moloy, Woburn 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River 

3. Wm. Day, Wareham 

4. Chas. L. Woodman, Manchaug 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield 

6. Jos. L. Peabody, Winchendon 

7. Verne J. Fitzroy, Savoy 

8. Lincoln Crowell, Sandwich 



District Moth Superintendents 

1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly 

2. William A. Hatch, Marlborough 

3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill 

4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Foxboro 

5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay 

6. Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester 

7. Grover C. Twiss, Holyoke 



State Plantations. 

Seven new reforestation lots were planted, two unfinished lots com- 
pleted, three lots filled in and two lots replanted after fire had destroyed 
the former plantation. During the months of April and May 213,000 
trees were set out and in the fall 13,100 more were planted. These plant- 
ings have all been successful, and soon will change the looks of the idle, 
cut-over land which the state has purchased. 

Liberation or release cuttings have been made on twenty-two reforesta- 
tion lots and ribes pulled from three lots that were found to be badly 
infected with blister rust before planting. We have many lots that are 
badly infected with the blister rust and this coming year it is the inten- 
tion of the department to eradicate all the ribes in the lots and in the 
immediate vicinity. We recommend that all prospective buyers of white 
pine planting stock look over their land thoroughly before planting, and 



P.D. 73 



9 



pull out all the ribes found. This will insure protection to the young 
plants. The following list shows the lots that have been worked on dur- 
ing the past year, together with the location, and the kind of work done. 

Flint, Andover — 5,000 trees planted and 40 acres liberated. 

Fenno, Westminster — 36 acres liberated. 

Holway, Sandwich — 24 acres liberated. 

Bishop, Hubbardston — 30,000 trees planted. 

Sohier, Rowley — &y 2 acres liberated. 

Weeks, Sandwich — 20 acres liberated. 

Stone, East Brookfield — 6,000 trees planted. 

Glebe, Hopkinton — 6,100 trees planted, 40 acres liberated and 5 acres 
brush disposal. 

Jacobs, Wellfleet — 8 acres liberated. 
Crowell, Dennis — 20 acres liberated. 
Cadwell & Glazier, Leverett — 90 acres liberated. 
Rhea, Boxford — 10 acres liberated. 
Smith, Barnstable — 17 acres liberated. 
Browne, Marlboro — 33 acres liberated. 
Simpkins, Yarmouth — 62 acres liberated. 
Crocker, Barnstable — 32 acres liberated. 
Leonard, Raynham — 12,000 trees planted. 
Churchill, Berkley — 12 acres liberated. 
LeClear, Brewster — 18 acres liberated. 
Bazeley, Uxbridge — 7,000 trees planted. 
Ross, Montague — 7,000 trees planted. 

Baker Box, Barre — 20,000 trees planted, 10 acres brush disposal. 

Hardy, Ashburnham — 57,000 trees planted. 

Howe, Princeton — 20,000 trees planted, 630 ribes pulled. 

Houghton, Princeton — 25,000 trees planted, 4,434 ribes pulled. 

Rugg, Princeton — 11 ribes pulled. 

Estabrook, Rutland — 30,000 trees planted. 

Vinal, Norwell — 11,000 trees planted. 

Rockwood, Ashburnham — 50 acres liberated. 

Baker, Warwick — 20,000 trees planted. 

The total number of trees planted amounted to 226,100, 573 acres were 
liberated and brush from 15 acres disposed of. 

Forest Survey. 

The work of completing the forest and land survey of the entire state 
is nearing an end. The past year we were able to finish Hampden County 
and nearly the entire county of Middlesex. This coming year it is the 
intention of the department to complete Middlesex and finish Barnstable 
County. We hope to have the entire state ready for publication within 
two years time. This work is accomplished in the summer time with 
the help of students from forestry colleges. 

A close study of the marketing possibilities is carried on at the same 
time and with this information on hand, the department feels that valu- 
able aid can be rendered the woodland owners and others. Since the farm 
woodlot is one of the best assets to the state, it is of vital importance 
that the best markets be obtained for the material cut from these woodlots. 

Extension Forestry. 

The Clarke-McNary bill passed by Congress in 1924 provides for co- 
operation between the Federal Government and the States in different 
lines of forestry work, one of these being "farm forestry extension" 
which means the education of the farmer and the small woodlot owner 
in the management of his wood and waste lands. In this state the work 
is in charge of the Agricultural Extension Service at Amherst, but 
through the co-operation of the Director for this state, Mr. Willard Mun- 



10 



P.D. 73 



son, two of the foresters of this department, Mr. Cook and Mr. Parmenter, 
act as the extension specialists in forestry. All educational work of this 
department and contacts with private owners is classed as "extension 
work" and is carried out as far as possible in co-operation with the county- 
extension services. Following is a brief summary of our efforts along 
this line. 

Woodlot Examinations. 
The most practical way of educating the private owner is to get him 
out in his own woodland and there point out to him on the ground the 
problems involved and the plan of management which should be pursued 
to meet them. When this work is done for an individual owner he is 
charged only the traveling expenses of the visiting forester. In western 
Massachusetts these expenses are figured from Springfield. If the owner 
through the county agent arranges for a demonstration and invites in 
a group of friends and neighbors, no charge is made even for traveling 
expenses. 

Following is a list of these examinations and demonstrations made 
during the past year, classified according to the principal problem in- 
volved. 



Problem 


Number 


Acres 


Thinnings and Improvement Cutting 


. 10 


1,050 


Forest Planting ..... 


. 15 


3,680 


Insects and Diseases .... 


7 


95 


Marketing ...... 


6 


8,372 


Taxation ... 


. 3 


180 




41 


13,377 



Lectures. 

Interest in forestry is shown by the numerous requests for lectures on 
the part of granges, men's clubs, women's clubs, luncheon clubs and kin- 
dred organizations. During the past year 85 such lectures were given 
and three talks broadcasted from the radio stations WNAC, WBZ and 
WEEI. 

The following meetings outside of the state were attended by repre- 
sentatives of this department: — 

Southern Forestry Congress, Richmond, Virginia. 

New England Foresters, Middlebury, Vermont. 

Association of State Foresters, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Extension Forestry Conference, Washington, D. C. 

Rhode Island Fish and Game Association, Providence, Rhode Island. 

Field Trips. 

The forestry committee of the Worcester County Farm Bureau ar- 
ranged two field excursions in November, one in the southern and one in 
the northern part of the county, for its members. About 25 people took 
part in these excursions and they were much interested in seeing the 
reforestation and improvement cutting work being done. It was not 
state work but private land which was shown on these occasions. We 
hope that other county extension services may arrange similar excursions. 

Exhibits. 

At the Eastern States Exposition we co-operated with the Department 
of Agriculture in providing a forest background for their exhibit on 
horticulture and gardening. Forestry exhibits were made at the Oxford 
and Northampton Fairs and at the Mail Advertising Convention in Bos- 
ton. Small exhibits were set up for the Great Barrington Garden Club 
and the Orange Woman's Club. We acquired this year three forest fire 



.D. 73 



11 



transparencies which are so arranged that a celluloid cylinder inside, re- 
volving from the heat of the electric lamp, gives the impression of moving 
flames and smoke, and is quite impressive. During the forest fire season 
these transparencies were placed in store windows with appropriate pos- 
ters and setting, and form a striking educational feature which can be 
easily moved and which has nothing to get out of order. The stereomoto- 
graph with its colored slides was as usual loaned to libraries for periods 
of from two to three weeks. 

Blister Rust Work. 

The white pine blister rust, a plant disease which causes serious dam- 
age to white pine trees, and is transmitted through the agency of currant 
and gooseberry bushes, has become generally distributed throughout the 
Commonwealth. Blister rust was first discovered in Massachusetts in 
1917, and to date, — November 30, 1926, the disease is known to be pres- 
ent in 210 townships in the State. The degree of infection naturally 
varies from the single tree or "spot" type to areas of general infection 
and small plots where the disease has already inflicted serious injury. 

In an effort to prevent the further spread of the disease, the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Agriculture has been designated to conduct an 
intensive state-wide campaign of education and service in co-operation 
with the United States Department of Agriculture. The purpose of this 
campaign is to disseminate information regarding the disease, and to 
secure the concerted action of all concerned, to promptly eradicate wild 
and cultivated currant and gooseberry bushes wherever they may be en- 
dangering valuable white pine trees. The ultimate aim of the campaign 
is to secure the voluntary action of property owners in permanently pro- 
tecting their white pine trees against this disease, just as they protect 
their vegetables and fruit crops against the inroads of other pests. 

As a result of successful interviews with property owners throughout 
the State, 1,845 individuals actually eradicated currant and gooseberry 
bushes from their lands, during the season of 1926. These owners up- 
rooted 1,083,039 wild bushes, and sacrificed 25,596 plants under cultiva- 
tion. This control work involved the thorough examination of 189,080 
acres of land, 78,427 acres of which is producing a crop of white pine. 
The average cost of this control work was 14c. per acre. 

Nurseries. 

During 1926 there were shipped from our nurseries 3,540,724 young 
trees. This stock was distributed as follows: — 



Sold .' 1,396,674 

State Forests 1,193,675 

Reforestation Lots ........ 215,500 

Town Forests 303,050 

State Institutions ........ 415,675 

Boy Scouts 16,150 



3,540,724 

The new nursery at Clinton has been partially developed and now con- 
tains 1,406,000 transplants. We expect to add a like amount during this 
current year and plan to increase the amount yearly until there are 
5,000,000 transplants there with an annual shipping total of two and one- 
half million plants. 

We are decreasing the product of our reservation nurseries to cor- 
respond with the increase at Clinton, feeling that for the present at 
least an annual distribution of 4,000,000 plants will be sufficient to take 
care of private demands and our own projects. 



12 



P.D. 73 



State Forests. 

The work of maintaining and developing the state forests has con- 
tinued during the year as far as funds permitted. As road construction 
and building of fire lines has progressed, it has become possible to put 
increasing attention on the silvicultural treatment of the growing forests. 
Although our state forests are made up for the most part of lands which 
have been cut over and abandoned farms, a condition made necessary 
by the $5 per acre limit on the price of the land, nevertheless there are 
scattered portions containing merchantable timber and cordwood and 
whenever feasible, we are turning this material to use and so producing 
some income. We hope that this income account will increase from year 
to year as the growth on the forest becomes more and more valuable. 

Arthur Warton Sivann Forest. An improvement thinning in mixed 
hardwood growth was made with a resulting product of 23 cords of wood. 
Planting included the setting of 13,600 trees and 96,000 seedlings set in 
the nursery. The older pine plantations (86 acres) were gone over for 
pine weevil eradication. Twelve acres of young mixed hardwood growth 
was weeded. One mile of main road was repaired. Two miles of forest 
trail were maintained and one and one-quarter miles of new trail built. 
Only minor repairs were made to the buildings. 

Ashburnham Forest. Slash was piled and burnt on 10 acres of cut- 
over land and release cutting of planted pine done on about 90 acres. 

Beartown Forest. Beartown reforestation work was continued by the 
planting of 82,000 spruce and one and one-half miles of trail were opened 
up. 

Blandford Forest. Made a fire line along the railroad and cleaned up 
slash by the side of the state road. Burnt up two sets of abandoned 
buildings. 

Colrain Forest. Planted 8,000 trees, brushed out forest roads. About 
42 pines in the older plantations were found to be infected with blister 
rust, so it was decided to eradicate the currants and gooseberries from 
the forest. About 10,000 plants were pulled on an area of 2,000 acres. 
The Department of Agriculture handled this work for us. 

Erving Forest. During the winter the crew cleaned up an area of dead 
chestnuts, taking out 330 posts and 75 cords of wood. The mountain road 
was cleared of stone and made over for travel for one and one half miles. 
From the nursery 83,000 transplants were taken out and 100,000 seedlings 
were put in. The Hedberg property near the Erving Paper Mills was 
acquired as a headquarters house and put in shape for use. The Kurtz 
house proved to be so far gone that it could not be repaired economically, 
and was torn down. 

Harold Parker Forest. About 15 acres of mixed pine and hardwood 
growth has been thinned and all but 12 cords of wood sold. About 5,000 
young pines were set in openings left after this thinning. Considerable 
work was done in grading and repairing forest roads. A garage has been 
constructed at headquarters and a well dug for fire protection purposes. 

Marthas Vineyard Forest. Brushed three miles of fire line prepara- 
tory to plowing, and cleared out two and one-half miles of wood roads. 
Planting was carried out, both during spring and fall, by the use of 
104,000 transplants of Scotch, Spanish and Austrian pines, and the nur- 
sery with its 360,000 transplants was cared for. 

Mohawk Trail Forest. Cleared brush in seven miles of forest road and 
planted 17,000 trees. Maintained the motor camping grounds and kept 
up a demonstration nursery. 

Monroe Forest. Planted 10,000 spruce. 

Myles Standish Forest. Planted 207,000 trees and 300,000 seedlings set 
in the nursery which has been surrounded by an eight inch fence to keep 
out the deer. Some 35 miles of old fire lines were brushed and harrowed 
and 3 miles of new line constructed. Several new camps have been erected 
at College Pond and a Girl Scout Camp has been built at Barretts Pond. 



P.D. 73 



13 



Automobile traffic to and from this forest increases yearly and is getting 
to be a serious problem, especially that coming via the long and narrow 
wood road leading in from Plymouth. 

Mount Grace Forest. Ninety acres of planted land were given a libera- 
tion cutting and 50 acres of natural pine growth given the same treat- 
ment. It was thought that about all the chestnut growth killed by the 
blight at this mountain had been removed but scouting revealed the fact 
that a number of merchantable size trees still remain and arrangements 
were made to sell them to a local operator who has already started cutting. 

October Mountain Forest. During the winter a strip of hardwood 
forest along the Washington Brook Road and the New Lenox Road was 
thinned, the resulting product amounting to 150 cords of wood. Much 
work was done on the roads by grading with gravel and cinders, new 
culverts put in and brush mowed in forest roads. Planting work com- 
prised the setting of 230,000 trees taken from a local nursery. Only a 
few seedlings were transplanted to the nursery. Some changes were made 
in both the upper and lower headquarter houses including the installa- 
tion of two bath rooms, practically all the material for these repairs 
coming from the old Whitney mansion. The Whitney mansion and stables 
were turned over to the Divison of Fisheries and Game to be torn down 
and the salvaged material to be used by them for construction purposes 
at their game farms or hatcheries. We saved the Honeymoon Cottage 
and the water tower and the latter was put in shape for fire observation 
purposes. 

Otter River Forest. Liberation cuttings were carried on in red and 
white pine plantations totaling 70 acres and some thinning work done in 
natural pine stands. Planting work included the setting of 26,000 Jap- 
anese red pine. The nursery on this forest has become an important in- 
stitution so that 334,000 transplants were taken from it and 680,000 two- 
year seedlings were set in. A little road work was done and minor re- 
pairs to buildings made. This state forest was unfortunate in suffering 
from a fire set by the Boston and Maine Railroad which burnt nearly 
100 acres of land, reforested 7 years ago. The Railroad settled for the 
damage. 

Savoy Mountain Forest. Cut 50 cords of wood in section where trees 
were badly damaged by the ice storm. Repaired 7 miles of forest roads 
and cut brush on two miles. Planted 80,000 trees and maintained the 
two small transplant nurseries. 

Shawme Forest. (Cape Cod.) The most important factor on this 
forest is fire protection and for this reason two and one-half miles of 50- 
foot fire line have been constructed, and one mile of 20-foot fire break. 
In addition brush was cut at the side of 6 miles of forest growth. Re- 
forestation work was accomplished by the use of 164,000 trees and one 
and one-fourth acres of brush land cleared for use as a transplant nur- 
sery. 

Templeton Forest. Fredette lot was reforested with 40,000 spruce and 
33,000 pines were planted on the Hadley lot. 

Tolland-Granville Forest. Planted 70,000 pine on south section and 
30,000 on the north. Moved brush on 14 miles of forest roads and trails 
and along 2 miles of main road. Made some repairs on headquarters 
buildings. Fenced up seven old wells. Liberated natural pine growth 
from grey birch on about 10 acres of land. 

Wendell Forest. Planted 41,000 trees and cleared the brush on several 
miles of road. Some liberation cutting in planted stands was done. 

Windsor Forest. Planted 240,000 trees principally spruce and stretched 
a wire cable fence along the east of the precipice overlooking the Jams to 
prevent visitors from falling over. The auto parking grounds were pa- 
troled and kept clean. 



14 



P.D. 73 



Area of the State Forests, November 30, 1926. 



Nnvnp of Fnrp<if 


A oven a p 

986.75 


Nntwp of Fovp^t 


A C.YPfl HP. 

lit / 


Arthur Wart on Swann 

ill lilUi IT Ctl Lull kj v> Clllll 


Oakham 

\_s CXXYXXCX 1XX 


504.05 


A «? Vi h 1 1 t* n Vi ji m 

^loil KJ LI J. llild ill 


i 078 075 


OptoHpv TVTniiTi1"fli n 

Vy L vJ UC1 XVXv/ LI 11 LCI 111 


13 652 6 


Barre 


233.5 


Otis 


2,772.81 


Bash Bish 


39o!o8 


Otter River 


l[812.46 


JJCul LU Wil . . 


7 399 93 


Ovf nrd 


28.7 


Blandf ord 


1,419.5 


Peru . 


1,588. 


Brimfield 


463!5 


Petersham 


248.15 


Clarksburg 


1,764. 


Pittsfield 


1,082.54 


ColrA in 


1 206 194 


Sandisfipld 


3 998 76 


Conwav 


1,489.12 


Savnv Mountain 

kJ V \JJ XTXv IX XX l« CI XXX 


7,116.98 


Erving 


4431 565 


Shawmp ( takings ^ 

K^f 1 1CI TT lli\> \ LU1111J O ✓ 


8,422.12 


Fmchoron Q*h 

X VAUV/l vUg 11 


381.385 


SVintp«5hnrv 


638 36 


Harold Parker 


1,327.6 


Spencer 


625.125 


TTawlpv 


1,523. 


Sutton 


234.5615 




'724.37 


T P TTI D 1 P t O Tl 

X vill Ulv LVy XX 


377.5 


T iPo tti in sfpr 


1 283 475 


Tnllflnd-Oranvillp 

X WllttliU \_J X C4XX V lllv 


4,577. 


Marthas Vinpvard (tak- 


Warwick 

T V C* X VV XV^XTk 


960.45 


intrs^ 


4,472.75 


Wendell 


4,251.86 


Mohawk Trail 


5,273.6 


Westminster 


540.8388 


Monroe 


2,762.57 


Windsor 


1,450.05 


Mount Grace 


1,065.825 


Worthington 


225. 


Myles Standish (inc. 




Unassigned 


'. 1,093.325 


taking) . 


8,869. 






Northfield . 


235.4875 




104,982.5168 



Report of the Forester in Western Massachusetts. 
Mr. W. A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — The following is a detailed report of the forestry work pursued 
through the Springfield office of the Forestry Division during the fiscal 
year ending November 1926. 

Introduction 
General Statement 

The establishment of an office at Springfield has stimulated an interest 
in forestry in the western section of the state, and has made it possible 
to pursue more effectively the forestry work on the state forests located 
in the four western counties. The service rendered to the people is al- 
ready appreciated, and the field of endeavor covers a wide scope of forestry 
subjects. In general the work may be considered under two heads : first, 
forestry in connection with the state forests ; secondly, extension forestry 
which includes service rendered to the individual or groups of individuals. 
While more time is now given to the state forests, the extension work is 
rapidly increasing. 

Headquarters * 

Through the courtesy of the Hampden County Improvement League, and 
the approval of its president, Mr. H. A. Moses, adequate office space, steno- 
graphic service, and telephone have been provided, without charge, in the 
new League Building, a gift from its president, accessibly located in West 
Springfield. This arrangement makes it possible to conduct the Depart- 
ment's business in an atmosphere of friendly co-operation. 

Personnel 

The immediate force connected with this office consists of myself in 
charge of the work under instruction from the Chief Forester in Boston, 
and one permanent man, R. M. Hick, Forest and Type Surveyor, working 
under my personal direction. Such other help as has been required has 
been engaged for limited periods. 



P.D. 73 

FORESTRY ON STATE FORESTS 

General Statement 



15 



The total area of the State Forests comprises 104,982.52 acres of which 
73,180.5 acres or 69.7% of the entire area are located within the four 
western counties. For this reason this office is primarily concerned with 
the silvicultural work on the state owned lands. This work includes 
forest and type surveying, planting, release cuttings, improvement thin- 
nings, logging, blister rust eradication, insect attacks, and studies. In 
addition other miscellaneous work includes: the examination of lands for 
purchase, examination for special privileges, investigations of trespass, 
infringement of cutting rights, and special investigations. As yet, no 
trained foresters have been employed as superintendents on these state 
forests, but the present force of superintendents under proper instruction 
and guidance has been able to carry out such silvical operations as have 
been assigned. 

Forest and Type Surveying 

In order to properly manage and develop the state forests it has been 
necessary to survey the conditions as they exist within the boundaries of 
each forest. Through a method of survey the land has been subdivided 
into types in accordance with the distribution of growth found. The 
location of the various types has been indicated by lines and symbols on 
maps of convenient size. In order to make the types more comprehensive 
these maps have been colored, each type being represented by a separate 
color. In carrying on these surveys, data also has been secured relative 
to the composition of the growth by species, size and crown density; 
areas of cut, burned brush land, open land, and plantations have been 
located; and the location of streams, lakes or ponds, roads, buildings and 
other improvements have been noted. This information has likewise been 
added to the maps. This work has been in progress for the past three 
field seasons, and now that adequate office space has been acquired in the 
new building of the Hampden County Improvement League, the field data 
have been compiled, and sixteen colored maps covering a total of 21,627 
acres together with other data relative to area distribution and compo- 
sition of the forest growth have been submitted for your consideration. 
Progress is being made on additional data covering 12,317 acres. When 
this is completed, 33,944 acres within the Erving, Mohawk Trail, October 
Mountain, Otis, Peru, Sandisfield, Savoy, Tolland-Granville, and Windsor 
state forests will have been surveyed in the manner described. It is well 
to note that most of this work has been done by one regular crew of two 
men with such assistance as I have been able to give. Only during a 
period of three months in 1924 were two regular crews of two men each 
available. 

Not only are the maps and data of these surveys an advantage to the 
forestry developments of these forests but they will be of great benefit 
in their protection from fire, in the locating and maintenance of roads, 
and in the construction of other permanent improvements. 

Mr. A. F. Hawes, State Forester of Connecticut, has studied with me 
our method of survey, type distribution, compilation of data, and map 
colors with a view to using a similar system in his state forest acquisition 
work in Connecticut. 



16 P.D. 73 

SUMMARY OF COMPLETED TYPE SURVEYS 



Distribution of Area According to Forest Types. 





Acres 


Per cent 


Softwood .... 


571.4 


2.64 


Softwood-Hardwood 


1,450.7 


6.71 


Hardwood-Softwood 


2,375.3 


10.98 


Hardwood .... 


8,401.1 


38.85 


100% open land 


705.5 


3.26 


50-90% open land . 


775.1 


3.58 


Under 50% open land 


. ' . 80.2 


.37 


Plantation .... 


980.9 


4.53 


Brush ..... 


1,932.0 


8.94 


Recent cutover 


1,951.5 


9.02 


Old cutover .... 


1,697.3 


7.85 


Cut and burn 


61.4 


.29 


Burn ..... 


242.5 


1.12 


Swamp .... 


169.7 


.79 


Water 


115.7 


.53 


Roads ..... 


116.7 


.54 


Totals . . 


. 21,627.0 


100.00 



A few interesting facts have been drawn from the results of these sur- 
veys. On a basis of 21,627 acres, the figures show that 59.18% of the 
area is timbered. This large percentage is due to the area of 12,799.7 
acres in the October Mountain Forest, 75% of which is timbered, yet 
eliminating this forest, 35.6% of the balance of the total area covered 
contains timber. 980.0 acres or 4.53% have been planted and one-half 
of this only partially plantable. 16.87% has been cut over in recent years. 
This would indicate that the areas as a whole are fairly free from in- 
flammable debris resulting from cutting operations. Noticeable evidence 
of recent fires has been found on only 1.41% of the area showing that the 
fire risk has been low in the sections in which these state forests are 
located. 

Planting t 

As in the past, the planting of the open lands on the state forests in 
the western district has continued and 752,200 trees have been set. 

Assistance was rendered to the superintendent of the October Moun- 
tain Forest in locating areas to be planted and the plantings were later 
inspected. 

Again referring to survey data, there is only 3.26% of open land on 
these 21,627 acres and but 3.58% of partially open land. This is indeed 
small as compared with the whole area and is contrary to the general 
supposition. The program of planting these open areas as soon as pos- 
sible is justified, since brush and bushes are continually spreading over 
the partially covered areas and undesirable conditions are gradually ap- 
pearing on some of the wholly open lands. With only 7.84% of plantable 
area it will be but a short time before planting will be secondary on many 
of these forests and practically all the time may be spent in the develop- 
ment of the more advanced growth. 

Thinning 

During the past year a considerable amount of material was removed 
as thinnings in some of the more valuable hardwoods in two sections on 
the October Mountain Forest. Too short a time has elapsed to note any 
direct benefit to the trees left, but the stands have been greatly improved 



P.D. 73 



17 



in appearance. The wood removed was made into cordwood which has 
been sold. Some thinnings were also made on the Erving Forest. 

Logging 

A small amount of ash and oak has been cut on the October Mountain 
Forest. The cutting and hauling to the main road was done by our own 
men, and the timber was sold in the log delivered to the road. 

Blister Rust Eradication 

Although no eradication crews were maintained in the field except in 
Colrain Forest as in the past, a constant watch was kept for the presence 
of blister rust on the white pine while in the woods. Blister rust was 
found within the Mohawk Trail Forest and the Savoy Forest. This has 
been reported to the Boston office and to both the Blister Rust Agents in 
Berkshire and Franklin Counties. Further examination should be made 
of these areas, and eradication crews should be placed in the field during 
the coming summer in order to prevent further spread of this disease. 

It was possible to co-operate with the Blister Rust Agent in Hampden 
County who has a place in our office in the Hampden County Improvement 
League Building. 

Insect Attacks 

A trip has been made over a number of the state forests in Franklin 
County with a representative of the Federal Gypsy Moth Laboratory at 
Melrose Highlands for the purpose of ascertaining the condition for the 
establishment of several sample areas on which to observe the work of 
the gypsy moth. Places were noted where conditions were favorable for 
such a study, and the desired areas have now been selected within the 
Erving Forest. 

Miscellaneous Work 

Examinations have been made of two parcels of land offered for pur- 
chase for state forest purposes. Both parcels were too detached from 
other state land to be acquired. 

On the request for a special privilege to pipe the overflow water of a 
spring on the Worthington Forest to a wayside stand on private land, an 
investigation was made and a report submitted for your consideration. 

A report has been submitted relative to the cutting in trespass of 4 x /2 
cords of wood on the Blandford Forest. When definite instructions were 
received from Boston as to how to proceed, the trespassers had left 
Springfield, and could not be found. A power line has since been built 
through the area cut over, and the timber would have been cut for this 
purpose. 

In accordance with instructions, I attended the trial of Alfred Atmore 
Pope Foundation, Incorporated vs. the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad, at Hartford. The Pope Foundation asked that the railway 
pay $100,000.00 for damages to its timber lands caused by a fire set by 
the railway, and further asked that the railway be required to use other 
than soft coal for fuel. Since many well known foresters were called as 
witnesses on both sides, the purpose of attending was to ascertain the 
kind of arguments used, the evidence admitted, and the judge's decision 
in order to be in a position to guide in the preparation of evidence in case 
of loss of state property from a similar cause. Notes were taken and 
these are available. 

EXTENSION FORESTRY 

General Statement 

Extension forestry embraces not only the education of the farmer and 
the woodlot owner in the management of his woodlands, but includes as 
well all educational work along forestry lines. In the western district 



18 



P.D. 73 



requests for service covering a wide field of forestry subjects are rapidly- 
increasing. Since this office is with the Hampden County Improvement 
League, an organization dealing with agricultural extension work, and 
further since Mr. H. A. Moses, the League's president, is especially in- 
terested in forestry, this no doubt has stimulated an interest in forestry 
which has brought many demands for information and service from in- 
dividuals, organizations, towns and cities in Hampden County. As this 
office is accessible in a large center of varying interests, and as I happen 
to have a knowledge of camp life and recreational activities, I have been 
able to fit into a number of these projects. Requests for information and 
service are not confined to Hampden County, but many come from the 
other three western counties. The work covered by extension forestry 
includes talks, examinations of land, planting, demonstrations, town for- 
ests, co-operation and exhibits. 

Talks 

During the year talks have been given to boy and girl scouts, boys' 
clubs, men's clubs, women's clubs, schools, and special meetings. The 
number of talks is given elsewhere in the report of the Division of 
Forestry. 

Examinations 

Advice to private owners relative to timber, woodlot management, and 
planting has been given through personal examinations. The number 
of these examinations is likewise given elsewhere in the report of the 
Division of Forestry. 

Planting. 

In co-operation with the Exchange Club of Springfield, 1,000 Norway 
spruce and 1,000 red pine have been planted on the Preventorium lands 
in Westfield owned by the Hampden County Tuberculosis Association. 
5,000 trees have also been planted by the Boy Scouts at Camp John Rob- 
inson in Westfield. 

Scouts 

I have acted as forestry advisor to the Hampden Council of Boy Scouts, 
have been a member of the Council, and have been a member of the camp 
committee assigned to Camp John Robinson. This camp consists of 65 
acres of cutover lands which are being improved by planting and forestry 
practice-. I have acted as merit badge examiner in forestry and conser- 
vation. An increasing number of boys have tried for badges in these 
subjects. I have been appointed wood-craft instructor for the Holyoke 
Boy Scout Council. 

At the New England Camp Conference of Boy Scouts, held at Spring- 
field, I held forestry conferences where I was able to advise several execu- 
tives both from in and outside of the state regarding the forestry possi- 
bilities on their camp sites. 

A group of Girl -Scouts has been taken on a field trip through Forest 
Park, Springfield, and these girls were instructed in forest, ornamental 
and shade tree planting, and also in the pruning of shade trees. 

Town Forests 

Already nineteen towns in the four western counties have established 
town forests, and more are assured for the coming year. The size varies 
from less than 100 acres to whole watersheds of 2,500 as in the case of 
Russell. Besides the offer of the Massachusetts Forestry Association to 
plant 5,000 trees on established forests of 100 acres or more in Berkshire 
County, three influential men add to this offer $150.00; in Franklin 
County the New England Box Company donates $50.00 ; and in Hampden 
County the Hampden County Improvement League jointly with the Cham- 



P.D. 73 



19 



ber of Commerce gives $50.00 to the first six towns complying with this 
requirement during the year. This shows the interest being taken to 
encourage towns in the town forest movement. This department likewise 
does its share. Meetings have been attended, talks given, examinations 
made, and advice given as to the establishment and development of town 
forests. In advising with the Russell town forest committee it was de- 
cided that the town would plant 30,000 trees annually for a period of ten 
years. On my vacation in eastern Massachusetts I have also acted as 
chairman of the Scituate town forest committee, being responsible for 
the purchase of the first area of 24 acres which contains 2 acres of white 
pine. Fifteen acres of slash have been cleaned up, and that portion of 
the area not containing a good stand of reproduction is ready to be 
planted. 

Cities and Towns 

In conjunction with the development of a park system in Springfield, 
a tract of land has been examined for the Planning Board. In co-opera- 
tion with the forester for the Springfield Park Department several plan- 
tations have been examined as well as a number of shade trees. An in- 
terest has also been taken in the moving of large trees. 

Several shade trees have been examined for the city of Pittsfield, and 
advice given as to their treatment. 

The town of Easthampton has also been advised regarding the pruning, 
repairing, and general care of its shade trees. 

Co-operation 

I have been a member of the Forestry Committee of both the Chamber 
of Commerce and the Hampden County Improvement League. These 
committees have been meeting jointly eaoh month, and the members have 
been anxious to help in forestry matters. ~ An outline has been prepared 
pointing out how the committee might function to advantage in Federal, 
State, and local forestry movements. 

The Directors of the 14th and 15th Districts of the Federation of 
Women's Clubs have created such an interest in forestry among their in- 
dividual clubs that a plan has been devised to raise money to buy land 
to build up and maintain a District Forest for a period of at least forty 
years. An estimate has been prepared for them of the cost per acre 
which will be required to do this. The individual clubs have been asked 
to subscribe money to buy an acre, or more or less. Several acres had 
been examined for the purpose but without success owing to the small 
size desired. Sufficient money had been secured to purchase 23 acres 
when Mr. H. A. Moses, taking an interest in the movement, came forth 
and jnade the women a gift of 33.64 acres located within his farm in 
the section which he is to develop along forestry lines. This gift insures 
the success of the project, and steps are under way to. plant in the spring. 
Such a move will surely add greatly to the interest in forestry. 

To establish a more definite and uniform study of trees in the rural and 
urban schools, several meetings with the Hampden County School Super- 
intendent have been attended to discuss the subject. A committee has 
been appointed and considerable amount of data has been submitted to it. 
While there is an interest in the possibility of the work, no definite plan 
of action has been suggested by the committee. The Nature Study direc- 
tor in the Springfield schools was persuaded to call the teachers under 
her supervision for a conference. As a result of this discussion and with 
the co-operation of the Park Department, two acres of land in Forest 
Park were prepared and set aside as a school nursery. Two thousand 
trees, of different species and ages, were secured from the state and 150 
children took part in the first planting in the nursery. Small plots are to 
be set aside for nursery beds at all schools where land is available. In 



» 



20 



P.D. 73 



the school nurseries it is planned to study the development of the little 
trees from the seed up. 

It has been suggested that the older children working from the different 
schools might make a census of the street trees of Springfield. This work 
might have to be supplemented by assistance from the Boy Scout troops 
in the city. A plan is being contemplated, and if it seems feasible and 
the teachers are sufficiently interested, it will be undertaken. 

Eight hundred Forest Primers have been secured from the American 
Tree Association for distribution in the Springfield schools, and an addi- 
tional 700 will be distributed in the schools in other places. 

The Hampden County Improvement League has been formulating plans 
to introduce forestry to the farmers as a part of good farm management, 
and to reach the boys and girls through its 4-H Club leaders. Conferences 
have been held with the Managing Director and the Club Agent Leader 
to render any assistance possible. 

Through a suggestion made to the Convention Manager of the Chamber 
of Commerce the Second New England Forestry Congress was held at 
Springfield in December last under the auspices of the Massachusetts 
Forestry Association. 

Exhibits 

During the year our department had exhibits at the Eastern States 
Exposition, in Springfield, at the Three County Fair in Northampton, and 
at the Second New England Forestry Conference in Springfield. 

Early in the year the Department of Agriculture signified its desire 
to have the co-operation of the Division of Forestry in its plan for ex- 
hibiting flowers and nursery stock in the state building at the Eastern 
States Exposition. This necessitated giving up the Division of Forestry 
wing and confining our efforts to the building of a mountain with green 
timbered slopes through which flowed a stream. This mountain located 
at the rear of the building, formed the background of the entire exhibit. 
To lend distance, a painted drop hung on the rear wall, and the stream 
appeared as the outlet of the lake painted on the drop. The stream after 
flowing through the mountain cascaded over the rocks into a lake some 
ten feet below. The foreground of the building was laid out in beds con- 
taining different varieties of flowers and evergreen nursery stock. The 
arrangement was planned by a landscape architect to represent a formal 
garden, and the effect was greatly admired by the throngs passing through 
the building. 

A small space was retained in the forestry wing of the state building 
where boxes containing 1, 2, 3, and 4 year white pines were shown. The 
electrical fire scene was also on display here. 

At the Three County Fair in Northampton our exhibit was allotted 
but a small space with the White Pine Blister Rust display. Boxes of 
1, 2, 3, and 4 year white pine, the electrical fire scene, and some framed 
pictures were exhibited. 

At the Second New England Forestry Conference in Springfield, our 
exhibit consisted of the stereomotograph machine showing the story of 
forestry in Massachusetts, a number of logs of the commercial species in 
this section, and some pictures. 

The electrical fire scene has been on display in a store window in Spring- 
field during American Forest Week and later, during Fire Prevention 
Week, it has been in a store window in North Adams. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. C. A. Galarneau, Forester. 



P.D. 73 



Report of the State Fire Warden. 



21 



Mr. William A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with the provisions of section 26, chapter 48 of 
the General Laws, I submit herewith a report of the work accomplished 
by this branch of the divison during the year just ended. 

With the exception of our usual drought during the spring months the 
season has been a very favorable one. During this period we had several 
disastrous fires that burned over extensive areas and caused heavy dam- 
ages. These fires were confined mostly to southern and eastern Massa- 
chusetts and while some were deliberately set most of them were roadside 
fires caused by carelessness. During the year we have had 2,860 fires 
burning over an area of 34,675 acres with a cost to extinguish of $61,030 
and a damage of $163,668. 

In our endeavor to eliminate second-day fires we have continued to 
have the co-operation of the various wardens with the result that out of 
our total number of fires we have had but thirty-six second-day fires. 
Such fires can be prevented by careful control during the night and a 
suitable patrol to follow up during the day. This control of the fires was 
largely made possible by the use of our power pumps which are especially 
constructed for forest fire work. These small pumps can be carried into 
the woods to the nearest water and are capable of supplying 3,000 feet 
of one-inch hose. The value of these pumps was demonstrated at a serious 
fire in Sudbury where the use of two of them saved buildings valued at 
$40,000. This is but one incident of many where these pumps proved 
their value. Many towns will find it to their advantage to equip them- 
selves with power pumps and motor apparatus for transporting men and 
equipment to fires. 

A new 68-foot forest fire observation tower was erected in the town 
of Holbrook at a cost of $2,000. This station is one of the most important 
ones in the state as it covers a large area of inflammable and dangerous 
territory that has always been subject to fires. The towns of Abington, 
Avon, Holbrook, Randolph, Stoughton and Weymouth contributed $1,250 
to the cost of this tower. 

Several of our towers have been repainted and the telephone lines 
brushed out and repaired. The Manchester tower was completely over- 
hauled and a new building constructed at the top. 

We are using every precaution possible to protect our state forests 
from the ravages of forest fires. In our holdings in western Massachu- 
setts we are clearing out old roads, disposing of all brush following cut- 
ting operations and making all water-holes, rivers and ponds accessible 
in case of fire. On our state forests throughout central and eastern Mass- 
achusetts we have a much more dangerous condition and this is especially 
true on our state holdings in Barnstable, Plymouth and Dukes counties. 
Here we find it necessary to cut our areas up into 200-acre tracts with a 
fifty-foot fire line around each one. These fire lines have a road through 
the center and a ten-foot plowed strip at the extreme outside edge making 
it possible to confine a fire within a given area. 

The railroad fire situation remains practically the same as last year, 
there being about twenty-two per cent of our fires attributed to this cause. 

The Fish and Game Division of this department has, through its edu- 
cational work among the members of the various fish and game clubs 
throughout the state, been able to create a spirit of co-operation in the 
prevention of forest fires. In past years hunters and fishermen were 
charged with the responsibility of many of our fires. During the past 
year the number of fires attributed to this cause has been almost negli- 
gible. 

The automobilist and careless smoker are responsible for a large per- 
centage of our fires. This condition does not improve, in fact, more fires 
were attributed to this cause this year than in previous years. The drop- 



22 



P.D. 73 



ping of lighted matches or cigarettes and the throwing of them from 
automobiles is a habit that smokers have acquired and when we can cor- 
rect this habit we shall eliminate the chief cause of our fires. It may be 
necessary to have legislation enacted to accomplish this result. 

In connection with this need for education and information of the pub- 
lic, we include here a copy of the report submitted to the General Court 
relative to the value of an experiment which has been carried on in cer- 
tain towns during the year ending November 30, 1926. 

Department of Conservation, Division of Forestry, 
State House, Boston, November 22, 1926. 

To the Clerk of the House of Representatives, State House, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Sir: — In compliance with the provisions of Chapter 30 of the Resolves 
of 1926, I submit the following report. 

In accordance with provisions of this resolve an experiment is being 
carried on to determine the value of education and patrol in the preven- 
tion of forest fires. There are three co-operating agencies, the United 
States Forest Service, the Massachusetts Forestry Association and the 
Massachusetts Department of Conservation. 

The area selected for the experiment consists of the towns of Bourne, 
Barnstable, Falmouth, Mashpee, Sandwich and Yarmouth on Cape Cod. 
This district is recognized as having the highest forest fire hazard to be 
found in Massachusetts. In fact it would be difficult to find an equal area 
in the Eastern states that surpasses it in this regard. The pitch pine and 
scrub oak in mixture are the predominant species and both are highly 
inflammable. Fully fifty per cent of the forest area has been burned over 
at least once in the past twenty years and some sections have been swept 
by fire several times during this period. 

Another reason for selecting this area is the fact that it is practically 
surrounded by water, there being tide water to the north, south and west, 
while on the east the Bass River practically cuts the Cape in half. For 
forest fire prevention this area may be considered an island because any 
fire occurring on it must have originated there since the possibility of 
fires spreading into this area from adjoining territory is very remote. 

In order that detailed plans might be made for carrying on this ex- 
periment a meeting of representatives of the United States Forest Serv- 
ice, the Massachusetts Forestry Association, the Forestry Division of the 
Department of Conservation and the town forest wardens of the six towns 
was held at the State Forester's Office where definite plans were worked 
out and later put into operation. 

The educational work was begun by the Massachusetts Forestry Asso- 
ciation on the first of January. Its forester, equipped with motion pic- 
tures, bulletins describing the experiment and setting forth methods of 
fire prevention, posters and other educational material, spent months in 
the district giving talks to all the schools, boards of trade, women's clubs, 
fraternal organizations, civic associations, church clubs, and similar 
groups, — in fact to every kind of gathering where the snowing of the 
pictures was possible. Conferences with individuals and small groups 
were held in every community. By fhe end of the three months practi- 
cally every man, woman and child in the district knew about the experi- 
ment, and what each could do to help. The press devoted much space to 
the experiment, and the railroads, electric power companies and manu- 
facturers pledged their hearty co-operation. As a climax to the work of 
the Association's forester, the lecturer of the United States Forest Serv- 
ice spent a week in the district giving special talks to selected groups. 

As a part of the educational campaign carried on, a study was made 
of the woodlands to determine how the work of the fire wardens could be 
made more effective. It was found that many areas ranging from 1,000 



P.D. 73 23 
to 4,000 acres contained no roads passable for vehicles, and a fire starting 
in the interior of one of these tracts could" not be reached with fire ap- 
paratus until it had burned to the nearest road. It was decided to re- 
move the brush and inflammable material from the old public and logging 
roads and to cut these large tracts into smaller ones averaging about 
160 acres each. The estimated mileage to be brushed out in these six 
towns was 176 miles, and 120 miles of these roads were opened at an 
average cost of $30 per mile, or a total of $3,600, one-half of this expense 
being borne by the Massachusetts Forestry Association and one-half "by 
the various towns in which the work was done. This expenditure should 
not be considered as a part of the cost of the experiment because it simply 
represents a result of the educational work. 

Immediately following the educational campaign, the State Forester 
appointed two men who were familiar with the district to act as forest 
rangers. These men patrolled all the roads, visited camp and picnic 
grounds, distributed fire prevention literature, interviewed the occupants 
of all automobiles found parked in the woodland or along the roadside, 
saw that no brush or rubbish burning was done except under permit, 
reported all fires and the cause of the same, suppressed small fires dis- 
covered, disposed of fire hazards, so far as possible, such as paper and 
rubbish left on picnic grounds, inspected town dumps frequently, and 
kept the subject constantly before the public. These rangers were pro- 
vided with Ford cars equipped with small truck bodies in which they 
carried a number of water cans with hand pumps, shovels and other tools 
for fire suppression. They wore distinctive uniforms and police badges. 
They personally attended 117 fires, travelled 28,000 miles and interviewed 
over 8,000 persons. 

There have been 138 forest and grass fires this year as compared to 73, 
the average for the past three years. This increase of practically 90 per 
cent in the number of fires was due largely to the clearing of land in 
connection with the real estate boom and the presence of large numbers 
of people in the forests during the worst part of the fire season. This 
was a new factor in the fire prevention problem that was not present 
during the previous three years. Most of these people were non-residents 
and therefore it was not possible to reach all of them through the edu- 
cational campaign. 

The total area burned in the six towns this year was 3,771 acres, and 
the aggregate cost of the educational campaign, the patrol and the sup- 
pression was $12,452, as compared with the average yearly records dur- 
ing the three preceding years of 9,363 acres burned and $9,829 spent for 
suppression alone. This shows an increase in cost, for education, patrol 
and suppression, of $2,623, or 26.7 per cent higher than for suppression 
alone, but a reduction in area burned of 5,592 acres, or about 59.7 per 
cent. In other words by spending one-fourth more under this system 
the loss in acres burned was reduced about three-fifths. This, however, 
is recognized as an exceptionally bad fire year, and when we compare the 
figures of this year with those of the worst of the three preceding years, 
which were 21,444 acres burned and a cost of suppression of $9,924, we 
find that the cost has been increased by only 25.5 per cent, while the 
acreage burned has been reduced by 82.4 per cent. 

The most encouraging feature of the whole experiment thus far is the 
change that is noted in public sentiment toward the fire problem. The 
people now have renewed hope that productive forests can again be estab- 
lished on Cape Cod. Greater interest in reforestation has been shown 
because of this determined effort to solve the fire problem. The towns 
have continued their appropriations for planting on town forests, the 
state is establishing a new nursery on the state forest and individuals 
have begun to reforest their idle lands. 

In conclusion would say that this experiment has been very successful 
and in my opinion justifies the time and expense that has been applied to 



24 



P.D. 73 



it, and I would recommend that the experiment be continued during the 
next two years as was originally contemplated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner. 



The State Police have co-operated with us as far as their duties would 
permit. They have furnished very valuable assistance at many of our 
fires, have warned large numbers of the traveling public relative to the 
danger of camp fires and have ascertained whether parties burning were 
provided with the necessary permit for such burning. 

Owing to insufficient funds we were unable to hold our forest fire con- 
ferences throughout the state as in past years. While an appropriation 
was made it did not become available until early spring when it was too 
late to hold the meetings and the balance for this purpose was allowed 
to return to the Treasurer. These meetings are very instructive and will 
be continued this coming winter. 

The permit law has been enforced quite generally with satisfactory 
results. It was found necessary during very dry periods to have the 
wardens discontinue issuing them excepting for use on rainy days. While 
this met with some opposition it had the desired effect of reducing fire 
damages from this cause. 

We have had some difficulty in enforcing the roadside slash law. Many 
tree wardens fail to see the importance of removing this brush at the 
time of cutting and in some instances it has been allowed to accumulate 
thus becoming a fire menace. 

The co-operation we have received from the various power and tele- 
phone companies has been very gratifying. In nearly all instances they 
have disposed of their brush following cutting operations in a very satis- 
factory manner. 

The co-operative work between the Federal Forest Service and our de- 
partment has continued under the Clarke-McNary Law. The state allot- 
ment under this act was $12,600. 

The following tables show the comparative damages, costs, etc. for the 
past three years. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden. 

Comparative Damages by Forest Fires for the Past Three Years. 



Year 
1924 
1925 
1926 



Number Acreage 
of fires burned 



3,735 
3,310 
2,860 



Cost to 
extinguish 
47,522 $85,477.00 
43,876 66,855.00 
34,675 61,030.00 

Types of Classified Damages. 



Av- 
erage Average 
acreage damage 
Damage per fire per fire 
$189,018.00 12.72 50.61 
194,741.00 13.25 58.83 
163,668.00 12.12 57.22 



Standing trees . 

Logs, lumber, cordwood 

Buildings 

Bridges, fences . 

Sproutland 

Miscellaneous 



1925 
$108,894.00 
32,627.00 
33,260.00 
1,768.00 
18,135.00 
57.00 



1926 
$83,998.00 
25,027.00 
35,981.00 
1,427.00 
16,550.00 
685.00 



$194,741.00 



$163,668.00 



P.D. 73 



Types of Land Burned Over (Acres). 



25 









1925 


1926 


Timber 






2,490 


1,153 


Second growth . 






7,827 


5,528 


Second growth, not merchantable 




10,837 


7,223 


J_>1 Uoll lalXU 






. 17,181 


16,550 


Crrass land 






5,541 


A 991 


Totals 






. 43,876 


34,675 




Forest Fires of 1926. 










Cost to 




Months 


Number 


Acres 


Extinguish 


Damage 


1925 










December 


70 


200 


$517.00 


$572.00 


1926 










January- 


26 


97 


206.00 


539.00 


February 


4 


6 


7.00 




TVTn t*pVi 

XrLctl 1*11 • 


128 


727 


1,457.00 


1,025.00 


April . 


. 1,365 


12,440 


19,337.00 


61,463.00 


May 


854 


18,984 


32,011.00 


85,792.00 


June 


126 


567 


2,909.00 


4,149.00 


July 


186 


1,092 


3,196.00 


9,232.00 


August 


18 


47 


326.00 


187.00 


September 


27 


57 


381.00 


OOO AA 


October 


30 


393 


513.00 


356.00 


November 


26 


65 


170.00 


71.00 


Totals . 


. 2,860 


34,675 


$61,030.00 


$163,668.00 



Classified Causes of Forest Fires, 1925-1926. 





1925 


1926 


Number 


Per cent 


Number 


Per cent 


Railroad .... 


673 


20.33 


625 


21.85 


Lumbering 


5 


.15 


2 


.07 


Brush burning . 


537 


16.22 


481 


16.82 


Campers .... 


15 


.45 


10 


.35 


Incendiary 


80 


2.42 


107 


3.74 


Miscellaneous . 


1,170 


35.35 


1,002 


35.04 


Unknown 


830 


25.08 


633 


22.13 


Totals 


3,310 


100.00 


2,860 


100.00 



Railroad Fires of 1926. 



Num- Num- 







ber of 


ber 










locomo- 


of 


Acreage 


Cost to 




Railroad 


Mileage 


tives 


fires 


burned 


extinguish 


Damage 


New York, New Haven 












& Hartford . 


. 1,937 


1,088 


462 


3,521 


$7,869.00 


$29,227.00 


Boston & Albany 


970 


344 


44 


308 


667.00 


1,170.00 


Boston & Maine 


. 1,959 


1,048 


108 


869 


2,279.00 


10,565.00 


Central Vermont 


73 


23 


10 


53 


171.00 


234.00 


H. T. & W. 


9 


7 


1 


10 


4.00 


10.00 



Totals 



4,948 2,510 625 4,761 $10,990.00 $41,206.00 



26 



P.D. 73 



Report of the Superintendent of Moth Work. 



Hon. Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner. 

Sir: — I have the honor to present a report of the gypsy and brown-tail 
moth work for the year 1926. In this report I shall touch on general con- 
ditions throughout the state, and make suggestions for the next season's 
work. I also wish to call your attention to a few matters which I fear 
are the subject of misapprehension on the part of some of our citizens, 
and hope that the publicity of this report may correct them. 

As I reported last year, the apathy of cities and towns, the lack of suffi- 
cient appropriation, and the general feeling that the gypsy moth was no 
longer a serious pest, has allowed the gypsy moth to spread and increase 
in numbers again. Between fifty thousand and sixty thousand acres were 
defoliated or nearly so, much of this being woodland. A large part of 
this acreage was in the Cape Cod section, but additional new areas showed 
stripping. 

A list of new towns in which stripping occurred this year is as follows : 
Attleboro, Avon, Berkley, Carver, Dartmouth, Dover, Dunstable, Easton, 
Fall River, Franklin, Groton, Hanover, Hingham, Hopkinton, Ipswich, 
Lakeville, Marlborough, Mattapoisett, Mansfield, Milford, Newbury, 
Northborough, Norton, Pembroke, Plainville, Raynham, Rowley, Sher- 
born, Southborough, Swansea, Topsfield, Truro, Tyngsborough, Upton, 
West Newbury, Westport, Wrentham. 

A glance at this list will show the extent of the area badly infested this 
year. In addition to this, I must report that almost all towns have shown 
a marked increase in number of egg-clusters. Unless thorough and pains- 
taking work is done this winter in creosoting egg-clusters, followed by 
thorough spraying in the spring, many more towns will show stripping 
next summer. 

There is also a large block of about 36 square miles, comprising the 
towns of Groton, Littleton, and parts of Ayer, Shirley and Harvard, where 
the infestation is heavy. 

There has not been much change in brown-tail moth conditions. 

There seems to be a feeling on the part of the public that the Com- 
monwealth is carrying a large force of men in the gypsy moth work. I 
wish this impression might be corrected. Besides myself, there are only 
seven division men, who supervise the moth work of the towns and cities 
throughout the state. All labor is furnished by the towns and cities and 
each has a local superintendent, appointed by the Mayor or Selectmen. 
The law gives this office the power of approval or disapproval of this 
appointment only. The assistance given by the state is in the form of 
reimbursement to the municipalities after they have duly spent under 
state supervision a certain amount set by law. This assistance goes to 
the towns having smallest valuation, only. 

The experience of the last two years has proven that the help to be 
expected from insect parasites of the gypsy moth is only intermittent. 

The co-operative work on the North Shore has been carried on as usual. 
A financial statement is given here: — 



Financial Statement. 



Special North Shore Fund. 



Receipts. 



Balance from 1925 . 
State Forester . 
Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 
City of Beverly . 
Town of Manchester . 
Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 
Supt. of Buildings, State House 
State Forester, for work done 



$1,145.44 
2,000.00 
2,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
313.01 



9.93 
366.33 



$7,834. 



P.D. 73 



27 



Expenditures. 

Salaries $4,226.15 

Travel 456.96 

Stationery & postage . 2.13 

Telephone 88.47 

Freight & express 90.34 

Supplies 923.61 

Sundries 5.00 

Rent 260.00 

6,052.66 



Balance, November 30, 1926 $1,782.05 

The elm leaf beetle has continued present on our street trees and neces- 
sitates spraying of the State highways. For this purpose and for the 
spraying of the trees for the gypsy moth, the Department of Public Works 
sets aside the sum of $12,000.00. 

The report of the United States Department of Agriculture in respect 
to the propagating and disseminating of parasites follows. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Smith, Superintendent of Moth Work. 



Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts. 
By A. F. Burgess. 

Careful scouting and clean up work in Berkshire County, which com- 
prises that portion of the barrier zone which lies in Massachusetts, has 
been carried on during the past year by the U. S. Bureau of Entomology. 
Conditions in this county have improved and a material decrease in in- 
festation has resulted from the clean up and spraying work of the pre- 
vious year. Fewer infestations were found in the spring of 1925, and 
these were thoroughly treated and spraying applied during the summer. 

The inspection of products likely to carry the gypsy moth has been con- 
tinued and the amount of material shipped outside the area quarantined 
for the gypsy moth has increased slightly during the year. The volume 
of Christmas trees and greens, including evergreen boughs, laurels, etc., 
cut for holiday and other decorations is much greater than during any 
previous year and the amount of inspection work required to safeguard 
this material which is being shipped to points outside New England in- 
creased considerably. 

During the summer of 1925, three assistants from the gypsy moth lab- 
oratory were employed in Europe to secure and ship parasites to this 
country. Messrs. R. T. Webber and P. B. Dowden worked in Hungary, 
Czechoslovakia and Poland, while Mr. S. M. Dohanian carried on similar 
work in Spain and Portugal. During the early summer Mr. T. H. Jones 
made a special trip to Europe to receive shipments that were assembled 
and bring them to this country. This was necessary because the para- 
sites involved in these shipments required feeding and special attention 
en route and would have perished had they been shipped in the ordinary 
way. The result of the year's work in foreign countries has been satis- 
factory and most of the importations have arrived in this country in good 
condition. There are, however, a number of species of gypsy moth para- 
sites that are extremely difficult to ship or colonize until more information 
can be secured concerning their life histories and habits. Work along 
these lines will be attempted during the coming year. 

The work of collecting data on selected areas to determine the effect 
of defoliation on different species of trees has been continued. This pro- 



28 



P.D. 73 



ject has been under way for more than 10 years and the longer it is 
carried on the more valuable will be the information that is secured. In 
connection with this project the large sample plots selected to test the 
ability of different forest stands to survive defoliation have been con- 
tinued and the necessary data secured. 

Last year it was realized that the rate of parasitism had decreased 
slightly when compared with the previous year and the statement was 
made that if this decrease continued serious outbreaks of the insect might 
result. During the past summer heavy defoliation has occurred on Cape 
Cod where thousands of acres of trees have been completely denuded. 
In other sections of the State the infestation, based on the number of 
egg clusters found in the fall, has increased sharply and there has been 
a decided falling off in parasitism. The situation at present is critical 
and it is impossible to predict whether the gypsy moth will increase and 
heavy damage result or whether parasites will become more abundant 
and bring about a reduction in infestation. It is impossible to predict 
just what will happen but every effort should be made to prevent further 
increase of the insect. 

Data secured last year indicated that the parasitism of the brown-tail 
moth had been reduced, somewhat. Although full information is not at 
hand at the present time, the reports thus far received indicate that the 
insect is more abundant this year than during the previous year and un- 
less effective control measures are employed some defoliation is likely 
to result during the coming year. 



P.D. 73 



APPENDIX 



29 



Financial Statement 



Receipts and Expenditures for Year ending November SO, 1926 



Purpose of Appropriation 


Amount 


Refunds, 
Balances 

and 
Transfers 


Expendi- 
tures 


Balance to 
1927 


Balance to 
Treasury 


Salary of Commissioner .... 


$6,000 






$6,000 


00 


_ 








11,400 






10,745 


00 


_ 


$655 


00 


Expenses of Commissioner 


250 






81 


74 


_ 


168 


26 


Office Incidentals 


5,000 


$3 


33 


4,315 


89 


_ 


687 


44 


General Forestry and Nurseries 


13,000 






11,335 


57 


_ 


1,664 


43 


Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands . 


8,500 






8,499 


99 


_ 




01 


Prevention of Forest Fires 


60,000 


416 


03 


59,373 


39 


- 


1,042 


64 


Federal Forestry Fund ... 




18,259 


65 


18,158 


12 


101 53 






Protection against Forest Fires 


2,000 






1,445 


23 




554 


77 


Reimbursement for Fighting Fires . 


1,000 






276 


88 




723 


12 


Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-tail 




















50,000 


26,911 


36 


72,656 


81 


4,254 55 






Maintenance of State Forests . 


25,000 


20 


90 


24,977 


59 




43 


31 


Purchase and Development of State For- 


















ests : 


151,500 


6,719 


33 


143,555 


77 


14,663 56 






Maintenance of Mount Grace . 


500 






490 


80 




9 


20 


Maintenance of Standish Monument 


2,000 






1,958 


55 




41 


45 


Repair of Standish Monument. 




6,939 


34 


3,128 


25 


3,811 09 






Legislative Investigation of Prevention of 


















Forest Fires in Barnstable County 


2,000 






1,983 


07 


16 93 








$338,150 


$59,269 94 


$368,982 65 


$22,847 66 


$5,589 63 



Receipts, 1926. 



For ferns sold $625.00 

" cord wood ........ 1,241.15 

" hay, etc 351.80 

" apples 20.00 

" blueberries 110.00 

" lumber, posts and poles ...... 2,073.86 

" rent and camp sites ....... 1,100.67 

" sale of buildings and wagons, etc. ..... 249.00 

" right of way 2,000.00 

" damages by fire 2,750.00 

" receipts at Standish Monument 913.10 

" books, maps, etc. . 71.80 

" redemption of lots ....... 994.55 

" damages on reforestation lots ..... 264.00 

" spool wood sold on reforestation lots .... 140.00 

" examinations ........ 65.00 

" trees sold ......... 12,290.74 

" donations to North Shore Fund ..... 4,000.00 

" highway work ....... 800.00 

" supplies for gypsy moth work 6,230.91 

" sale of discarded equipment ...... 97.00 

M private spraying on North Shore 498.43 

** donations to cost of fire towers ..... 1,250.00 

" supplies for fire fighting ...... 2,217.19 

" interest on bank deposit ...... 112.94 



$40,467.14 



30 



P.D. 73 



Statement of Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests for the 
Year ending November 30, 1926 



State Forest 


Planting 
and 


General Up - 
keep, Fire 
Lines and 


Surveying 
1 1 ties 


Land 


Total? 


Receipts 




Nurseries 


Roads 








Arthur Warton Swann . 


$324 00 


$1,401 62 






$1,725 62 


$90 00 


Ashburnham 




1 084 00 


S353 25 


81 15 no 

fllU \J\J 


1552 25 


139 00 


Barre .... 




' 36 26 






36 26 




Bash Bish 














Beartown .... 


846 50 


152 50 






999 00 


20 00 


Blandford . 




276 50 


593 £0 




870 00 


A,UuU UO 


Brimfield .... 






763 57 




763 57 




Clarksburg 














Colrain .... 


130 00 


453 50 






583 50 


75 00 


Conway .... 






242 91 


1,015 00 


1,257 91 




Erving .... 


821 60 


5,213 58 


48 00 




6)083 18 


207 15 


Foxborough 






508 12 


1,914 17 


2)422 29 




Harold Parker 


50 75 


6,439 21 






6 489 96 


561 35 


Hawley .... 






25 50 




' 25 50 




Hubbardston 














Leominster . . . 






316 08 


3,302 29 


3,618 37 




Martha's Vineyard 


2,792 84 


3,581 67 


117 21 


7,872 71 


14)364 43 




Mohawk Trail 


172 99 


li550 02 


411 15 


270 00 


2)404 16 


845 54 


Monroe .... 


100 00 




44 65 


1,430 00 


1,574 65 


40 00 


Mount Grace . . . 


73 50 


465 00 






538 50 


138 50 


Myles Standish 


2,521 88 


6,220 68 


16 00 


70 00 


8,828 56 


964 00 


Northfield 














Oakham 




4 00 






4 00 


50 00 


October Mountain . 


2,919 50 


14,327 21 


122 35 


1,000 00 


18,369 06 


553 55 


Otis 




150 50 






150 50 




Otter River 


2,972 21 


2,467 54 






5,439 75 


2 79Q SO 


Oxford . . 














Peru 






227 30 


2,612 20 


2,839 50 


5 00 


Petersham . . . 














Pittsfield .... 






1,298 81 




1,298 81 




Sandisfield . 




24 94 


70 00 


5,020 05 


5,114 99 


201 00 


Savoy ^Nlountain 


1,462 75 


1,053 07 


167 61 


1,000 00 


3)683 43 


567 29 


Shawme .... 


l)572 32 


6)302 64 


8 08 


608 10 


8)491 14 


112 60 


Shutesbury ... 




56 00 




236 00 


292 00 




Spencer .... 




139 75 


264 28 


1,125 62 


1,529 65 


10 70 


Sutton .... 


- 




41 04 


125 00 


166 04 




Templeton 


869 54 




172 66 


1,453 74 


2,495 94 




Tolland-Granville . 


754 58 


2,544 78 


319 60 




3,618 96 


1,000 00 


Warwick .... 




56 00 


23 03 


287 15 


366 18 


10 00 


Wendell .... 


371 50 


3,009 25 


487 33 


376 95 


4,245 03 


15 00 


Westminster . 






343 75 


1,104 66 


1,448 41 




Windsor .... 


955 25 


80 03 


3 14 


165 00 


1,203 42 


116 00 


Worthington . 
















$19,711 71 


$57,090 25 


$6,988 92 


$31,103 64 


$114,894 52 


$10,521 48 



The Distribution of Supplies. 

Supplies have been furnished to towns and cities for gypsy moth work 
as usual. 

The amounts given below do not correspond with the amount of aid 
given to the municipalities, as some towns make payment to the state for 
all or a part of the bill for supplies, according to the amount of their net 
expenditures and their class, under the provisions of section 4, chapter 
132 of the General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement and for ex- 
penditures, see table on page 31. 

List of Towns and Amounts of Supplies Furnished for 1926. 



Acton 

Ashburnham 
Ashby 
Ashland 
Bedford 
Berkley 
Berlin 



$4.72 
92.35 
410.02 
7.15 
2.10 
222.76 
162.31 



Bolton 

Boxborough 

Boxford 

Boy Is ton 

Brewster 

Burlington 

Carlisle 



395.56 
384.81 
331.59 
29.92 
491.42 
1.40 
428.34 



P.D. 73 



31 



Dennis 


393.78 


Plainville 


201.59 


Dracut 


10.35 


Plympton 


186.86 


Dunstable 


177.69 


Raynham 


43.33 


East Bridgewater 


3.10 


Rochester 


315.12 


Eastham 


249.50 


Rowley 


393.91 


Freetown 


365.92 


Salisbury 


2.35 


Georgetown 


462.27 


Sandwich 


1,619.40 


Groton 


18.90 


Sherborn 


1,189.47 


Groveland 


161.44 


Southborough 


15.70 


Halifax 


418.03 


Sterling 


7.15 


Hanover 


15.70 


Tewksbury . 


447.78 


Hanson 


237.48 


Townsend 


9.85 


Harvard 


182.50 


Truro 


99.74 


Harwich 


677.76 


Tyngsborough 


292.13 


Kingston 


211.35 


Wayland 


9.10 


Lakeville 


1,592.06 


Wellfleet 


297.06 


Lunenburg . 


11.14 


Wenham 


1.75 


Lynnfield 


363.66 


West Boylston 


61.22 


Mashpee 


499.55 


West Bridgewater 


454.88 


Middleton 


325.62 


West Newbury 


231.33 


Newbury 


13.60 


Westford 


8.88 


Norfolk 


247.82 


Westminster 


18.35 


North Reading 


37.26 


Wilmington 


479.11 


Norwell 


361.66 


Yarmouth 


356.47 


Orleans 


91.10 






Pembroke 


77.67 




$16,924.94 


Pepperell 


11.05 





Purchase and Development of State Forests .... $547.83 

Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands .... 30.94 

General Forestry and Nurseries ...... 305.78 

Maintenance of State Forests ...... 407.18 

Prevention of Forest Fires 1,062.35 

Special North Shore Fund 429.62 

Special Legislative Investigation of Prevention of Forest 

Fires in Barnstable County . 43.06 

Automobile repairs, etc. ....... 856.66 



$3,769.54 



Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1926 





1926 


1927 


Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
ture 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Abington 

Acton 

Acushnet 

Adams 

Agawam 

Alford . 

Amesbury 

Amherst . 

Andover . 

Arlington 

Ashburnham . 


$2,681 55 
1,269 39 
1,849 38 
5,000 00 
3,421 15 

138 59 
5,000 00 
4,262 74 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 

842 92 




/ 61 00 
\ *173 20 




$4 72 

92 35 




$2,681 55 
1,269 39 
1.849 38 
5,000 00 
3,421 15 
138 59 
5,000 00 
4,262 74 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
842 92 


Ashby 


556 30 


545 92 


} I 


410 02 


399 64 


556 30 


Ashfield . 


583 00 










583 00 



* Lead sold 



32 



P.D. 73 



Cities and Towns 


1926 


1927 


Required 
Expendi- 
ture 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Ashland . 


$ 1,274 


59 








*7 1 s 
94 lo 




$1,274 


59 


Ainoi 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Attleboro 


5 000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Auburn 


1 942 


35 












l)942 


35 


Avon 


1 039 


48 












1 ,039 


48 


Ayer 


1 570 


76 












1 570 


76 


Barnstable 


5 000 


00 












5 000 


00 


Barre 


2,438 


27 












2)438 


27 


DCCKct . • 


448 


73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


448 


73 


.t>euiorci . 


1 249 


82 


$1,434 65 


$778 98 


$174 50 


2 10 


$176 60 


1 249 


82 


Belch ertown . 


884 


87 












884 


87 


Bellingham 


1,065 


49 












1,065 


49 


Belmont . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Berkley . 


397 


43 


ooy / / 


J.OO OU 




OOO T A 


OlO 1U 


oy/ 


At 

4o 


Berlin 


431 


37 


461 37 


f 48 50 

1 *Q1 OS 
[ *OL lo 


} 


162 31 


162 31 


431 


37 


Bernardston . 


405 


66 






) 






405 


66 


Beverly . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Billerica . 


4^083 


21 












4,083 


21 


Blackstone 


1270 


90 












l)270 


90 


Blandford 


520 


09 


- 


- 




- 


- 


520 


09 


Bolton 


418 


54 


356 40 


361 00 




395 56 


333 42 


418 


54 


Boston 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Bourne . 


3)900 


66 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3!900 


66 


Boxborough . 


145 


00 


145 37 


♦420 50 




384 81 


384 81 


145 


00 


Boxford 


458 


91 


sco 7 1 
Ooo i 1 


1 91 fi*? 


129 80 


331 59 


461 39 


458 


91 


Boylston 


341 


05 


525 78 


( A 1 fit 
\ *60'± 04 


\ 

175 00 

) 


29 92 


204 92 


341 


05 


Braintree . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Brewster 


655 


35 


1,389 75 


( 7 ;n 
\ *71 68 


\ 725 57 


491 42 


1,216 99 


655 


35 


Bridgewater 


3,186 


79 












3,186 


79 


Brimfield 


606 


48 












606 


48 


Brockton 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Brookfield 


693 


70 












693 


70 


Brookline . • 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Buckland 


l)333 


28 












1,333 


28 


Burlington 


754 


54 


Oi 4 vo 


1 sc. ao 
loo bU 




1 Aft 
1 4U 




754 


54 


Cambridge 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Canton 


3941 


46 












3,941 


46 


Carlisle . 


270 


00 


A OA 7 K 

4yo / o 






14o Ol 


iOS 1A 
t^fO ill 


270 


00 


Carver 


1 291 


63 












1,291 


63 


Charlemont 


476 


76 












476 


76 


Charlton . 


1,012 


88 












1,012 


88 


Chatham . . 


l)865 


34 












1,865 


34 


Chelmsford 


4 394 


04 












4,394 


04 


Chelsea . 


5)000 


00 












5i00O 


00 


L/nesnire 


677 


02 












677 


02 


Chester . 


695 


59 












695 


59 


Cnesterneld 


231 


79 












231 


79 


Chicopee 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


UnilmarK 


210 


37 












210 


37 


Clarksburg 


587 


44 












587 


44 


Clinton 


5 000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Cohasset 


3835 


91 












3)835 


91 


Colrain . . . 


999 


85 












999 


85 


Concord . 


3 783 


74 












3,783 


74 


Conway . 


448 


08 












448 


08 


Cummington . 


243 


34 












243 


34 


Dalton 


3,387 


57 


- 


- 




- 


- 


3,387 


57 


Dana 


361 


68 


202 87 


35 80 


— 




— 


361 


68 


Danvers . ■ • 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Dartmouth 


4,856 


57 












4,856 


57 


Dedham . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 


00 


Deerfield 


2,267 


38 












2,267 


38 


Dennis 


890 


44 


1,312 80 


/ 403 15 
\ *35 68 


J 413 36 


393 78 


807 14 


890 


44 


Dighton . 


1,959 


46 


— 


— 


— 




— 


1,959 


46 




997 


02 












997 


02 


Dover 


1,491 


97 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1.491 


97 


Dracut . 


2,427 


04 








10 35 




2,427 


04 


Dudley . 


2,827 


39 












2,827 


39 


Dunstable 


279 


94 


279 73 


/ 135 48 
\ *57 96 


} | 


177 69 


177 48 


279 


94 


Duxbury 


2,202 


50 












2,202 


50 


East Bridgewater . 


2,227 


03 








3 10 




2,227 


03 



* Lead sold 



P.D. 73 



33 



Cities and Towns 


1926 


1927 


Required 
Expendi- 
ture 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


tast rsrookneld 


$503 08 


— 






— 






$0U3 Uo 


East Longmeadow 


1,427 42 


— 






— 


~ 




1,427 42 


Eastham 


376 42 


$533 88 






$157 46 


$249 50 


$406 96 


376 42 


Easthampton 


5,000 00 












— 


O.OUO UO 


Easton 


3,056 34 


— 










— 


3,056 34 


Edgartown 


1,223 10 


— 








— 


— 


1 OOO 1 A 

1,226 10 


Egremont 


391 66 


— 










— 


391 66 


Enfield 


347 74 














347 74 


Erving 


•1,689 07 


- 












1 con AT 

1,689 07 


Essex 


632 14 


— 












632 14 


Everett . 


c I w \i \ aa 
5,000 00 














r A11A AA 

O.UUU uo 


r airhaven 


5,000 00 


— 






~ 


- 




5,000 00 


r all Kiver 


0,000 00 












— 


r AAA AA 

o,UUU uu 


Falmouth 


5,000 00 


— 








— 


— 


— AAA AA 

O.UUU uu 


r itch burg 


5,000 00 














5.UU0 00 


Florida 


669 98 


_ 






- 


_ 


_ 


CCA AQ 


Foxborough . 


2,002 80 


- 






- 


- 


- 


O AAA OA 

2.UU2 80 


Framingham . 


5,000 00 


— 






— 






5.000 00 


Franklin 


4,184 79 


— 






— 




— 


4,184 79 


Freetown 


902 21 


1,005 01 




277 75 


100 00 


365 92 


465 92 


902 21 


Gardner . 


5,000 00 


— 








— 


— 


5,000 00 


Gay Head 


40 30 


— 








— 


— 


40 30 


Georgetown . 


873 57 


876 76 


{ 


All IK 
Oil 10 

♦26 40 




462 27 


462 27 


873 57 


Gill .... 


403 92 






— 


- 


— 




403 92 


Gloucester 


m a aa AA 

0,000 00 








— 




— 


— AAA AA 

o.UUU UO 


Goshen 


169 27 














169 27 


Gosnold . 


OlO 1 














513 31 


Grafton . 


3,208 53 


- 






- 


- 


_ 


3,208 53 


Granby . 


486 00 








- 


- 


- 


486 00 


Granville . . 


339 73 


OCA C\£\ 

3bU 00 




27 o0 










Great Barrington 


5,000 00 








_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Greenfield 


5,000 00 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Greenwich 


281 82 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


281 82 


Groton 


1,779 15 


— 








18 90 


- 


1,779 15 


Groveland 


798 44 


555 04 


\ 


31o 40 
*57 15 


} 


161 44 


_ 


798 44 


Hadley 


1,737 89 


— 








— 


— 


1,737 89 


Halifax . 


586 85 


703 25 


t 
I 


o72 20 
*49 84 


} 116 40 


418 03 


534 43 


586 85 


Hamilton 


2,183 02 


- 








- 


_ 


2,183 02 


Hampden 


272 13 


- 






- 


- 


- 


272 13 


Hancock 


276 08 








— 


— 


— 


276 08 


Hanover 


1,467 79 










15 70 


— 


1,467 79 


Hanson . 


1,116 18 


1,114 31 




QflQ fin 

otto UO 




237 48 


235 61 


1,116 18 


Hardwick 


2,351 58 


— 






— 


~ 


— 


2,351 58 


Harvard . 


927 84 


892 46 




*sl0 76 




182 50 


147 12 


927 84 


Harwich . 


1,400 07 


1,920 74 


J 
I 


l.oys 89 
*64 20 


} 514 00 


677 76 


1,191 76 


1,400 07 


xiatneld . 


1,858 07 


~ 






— 


— 


~ 


1,858 07 


Haverhill 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Haw ley . 


124 31 












— 


124 31 


Heath 


201 05 










— 




201 05 


Hingham 


c aaa aa 
o.OOO 00 






- 








5,000 00 


Hinsdale 


458 38 






- 


• ' 7" 






458 38 


Holbrook 


1,436 43 












— 


1,436 43 


Holden 


1,356 24 








— 




— 


1,356 24 


Holland . 


108 37 






— 


— 




— 


108 37 


Holliston. 


1,578 96 


— 




— 




— 




1,578 96 


Holyoke . 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Hopedale 


Q ;to Qfi 














3,552 96 


Hopkinton 


1,205 67 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 


1,205 67 


riubbardston 


551 42 


- 






- 


- 


- 


551 42 


Hudson 


3,702 91 


- 










- 


O 7 AO Q1 

o,/uz yi 


Hull ; 


5,000 00 


— 








— 


— 


5,000 00 


Huntington . 


702 89 


— 






— 


— 


— 


702 89 


Ipswich . 


3,899 02 


— 






- 


- 


— 


3,899 02 


Kingston . 


1,226 31 


963 18 




213 25 




211 35 




1,226 31 


Lakeville. 


700 31 


1,341 56 


/ 
\ 


208 25 
♦94 19 


} 569 00 


1.592 06 


2,161 06 


700 31 


Lancaster 


1,530 56 














1,530 56 


Lanesborough 


593 04 














593 04 


Lawrence 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Lee . . . . 


2,739 24 














2,739 24 


Leicester 


2,126 21 














2.126 21 


Lenox 


3.170 37 














3,170 37 



* Lead sold 



34 



P.D. 73 





1926 


1927 


Cities and Towns 


Required 


Total Net 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 


Required 




Expendi- 
ture 


Expendi- 
ture 


received 
lrom 
State 


Expendi- 
tures 


Leominster 


st^ ooo on 












%1 000 00 


Leverett . • • 


247 62 












247 62 


Lexington • . 


^ 000 00 












c nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 


T ,(*Vf\ ATI 


146 29 












146 29 


Lincoln , ■ . 


1 410 60 












1 410 60 


T.itt lotrm 


853 37 












853 37 


Longme&dow • • 














3 2fi4 2fi 




x nno on 

o,uuu uu 












s onn nn 

o,uuu uu 


T ,\w\ 1 r» w 

J;UUIUVV • • • 


A 4.QO 07 












4,432 07 


Lunenburg . . 


825 72 


5>l,IZO DO 


«q7n 70 


•917 AO 


*1 1 14. 
• XI 1* 


•99B R9 
C^^O DJ 


825 72 




k nnn on 












k nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 


ijynnneicl ■ . 


1 162 73 


1 4ft*; »7 


con in 

ooy iu 


978 e;^ 
J/ o OO 


OOo OO 


R49 1 Q 

iy 


1,162 73 


^MdH-K 11 • • • 


k nnn nn 

o,uuu uu 












000 OO 


Al&nchester • . 


^ 000 00 












k nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 


ii ns field . . 


4 542 62 












4 <i49 fi9 


]\Iurl)lehe3.cl . ■ 


=i'ooo 00 












^ OOO 00 

t/»vJV/\/ V/U 


\f o pi r\r\ 

i\±iXl lwii . • • 


1 940 36 












1,940 36 




el nnn nn 












"i'ooo 00 




2 0K8 10 












2 nfiS 1Q 


AXd'Shpee . . 


309 42 


i n^*? in 

l,UOO 1U 


7 o c ok 
1 AO Jo 


/ rtO Do 


499 55 


1 243 23 


309 42 


\Ifittft.poisett • • 


1 ^9fi 1Q 












1 326 19 


A I synsird 


4 230 12 












4^230 12 


^leunciu . . 


1 282 77 












1 282 77 


AXedford . . 


z. nnn oo 












5^000 00 


Aledw&y . a 


1 478 11 












1 478 11 


AXelrose » . « 


c nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 












fi OOO 00 


iMendon . • • 


502 73 












502 73 


Alerrim&c . . 


1,014 54 












1 014 54 


AXethuen . ■ 


r; nnn oo 

o,uuu UU 












000 00 
o,uuu w W 


\f i rl r\ 1<*l"\nT*rni trli 


i lis nn 

1,010 uu 












4,318 00 


\Tirlrllpfipld 


145 10 












145 10 


\Iiddleton • . 


681 49 


cn4. i a 

OU* lo 


197 50 




325 62 


148 31 


681 49 


-\xiiiorcx . • 


nnn oo 












5,000 00 


\Iillbury . 


3,086 71 












a'osfi 7i 


jAlllllS . 


1*4^8 02 












1 4S8 02 


iviiiivixxe • . 


1,035 71 








_ 


_ 


1,035 71 


ATi 1 1 f\vt 

ilXXXLUiX ■ • • 


~ 000 00 










_ 


5^000 00 


IVXtJXXXUG ■ • . 


419 10 












419 10 


IVlonson 


1 RQQ 7fi 

1 ,U*7t7 i U 












1,699 76 




c nnn nn 

o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


Monterey 


321 92 












321 92 


Alontgomery . 


1 n7 97 
1U/ 












107 27 


IVlount "Washington 


90 96 












90 96 


Nahant . . • 


9 **t,4 qq 












2,354 33 


Nantucket ■ 


% 8fi9 93 

OtOU^ £-0 












3^862 23 


j\aiicK . . 


k nnn nn 
o,uuu UU 












5,000 00 


Needham . . 


c nnn nn 

o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


in ew /isixiuru. ■ 


60 61 












60 61 


New Bedford . 


k nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


New Braintree 


265 92 












265 92 




711 54 












711 54 


New Salem ■ ■ 


Qiin 1 1 

o-±U 1 1 












340 11 


Newbury 


1 191 92 








13 60 




1,191 92 


Newburyport 


r. nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


Newton . 


k nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 




829 40 


QS0 RS 
you oo 


296 85 


151 48 


247 82 


399 30 


829 40 


North Adams. 


000 00 












5,000 00 


North Andover 


4 760 94 








_ 


_ 


4,760 94 


No. Attleborough . 


c nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 










_ 


5,000 00 


IN UX XXX X}X lhjxvxxcxu. ■ 


1,516 56 






_ 


_ 


_ 


1,516 56 


in ortii xt,e<iu.ixig • 


826 46 




- 


- 


37 26 


- 


826 46 


Northampton. 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Northborough 


yoo OO 












953 83 


Northbridge . 


r nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


Northfield 


1 111 QQ 
1,111 OO 












1,111 38 


Norton 


1 AO A 97 

l,4Z4 o< 












1,424 37 


Norwell . 


810 99 


1,160 05 


f Q^O 9fi 
\ *23 29 


} 

348 75 

> 


361 66 


710 41 


810 99 


XT J 

Norwood, 


- nnn nn 
o,uuu uu 












5,000 00 


uaK Jtsiuns 


1,762 41 


- 


- 


- 


: 




1,762 41 


Oakham . . 


217 70 










_ 


217 70 


Orange 


3,127 79 












3,127 79 


Orleans . 


1,572 13 








91 10 




1,572 13 


Otis 


236 88 












236 88 


Oxford . 


1,725 64 












1,725 64 


Palmer . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 



* Lead sold 



P.D. 73 



35 





1926 


1927 
















Total 




Cities and Towns 


Required 
Expendi- 
ture 


l ocai i\ el 
Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


x axton . • « 


$421 16 














$421 16 


re&ooay 


= non no 

0,UUU UU 














^ aaa on 
o,uuu uu 


Pelham . . 


291 95 








_ 






291 95 


Pembroke 


1 0fi8 =>Q 


*i 007 Ifi 
©l, uu/ ID 


$813 71 




_ 


$77 67 


$16 24 


1 ,UOO Off 


.repperell 


1,783 55 








_ 


11 05 




l,/oO OO 


Peru 


167 42 














167 42 


Petersham 


824 07 














824 07 


Phillipston . 


203 40 


233 65 


100 60 










203 40 


^ non on 














5 000 OO 


.r lainneia 


180 31 














180 31 


Plainville . 


807 11 


1,034 27 


64 50 




$227 16 


201 59 


428 75 


807 1 1 


Plymouth . . 


5,000 00 














= ooo oo 
o,uuu uu 


Plympton 


361 99 


736 60 


172 50 




373 15 


186 86 


560 01 


361 99 


Prescott • • • 


151 65 














151 65 


Princeton . 
















603 93 


Provincetown . 


2 0fi7 01 














9 ART OI 
4iUD/ Ul 


Quincy 


^ ooo nn 














c OOO OO 

o.uuu uu 


Randolph . 


i Sfin oi 














l,OOU Ul 


Raynham 


859 27 


837 68 


227 35 




_ 


43 33 


11 74 


OHO 07 

ooy ^/ 


Reading . . 


5,000 00 








_ 






e aaa AA 
o.uuu uu 


xvenoDoin . 


929 27 


- 


— 




- 


- 


- 


OOO 07 




5,000 00 














c OOO OO 
o,uuu UU 


Richmond 


381 30 














381 30 


Rochester 


640 19 










315 12 




640 19 


Rockland 


q Q7n on 

0,171 U UU 














3,970 00 


Rockport . . 


9 9S9 QQ 














O OOO OQ 

z,zaz y.j 


Rowe 


175 56 














175 56 


Rowley . 


586 03 


885 82 


/ 87 03 
\ *55 43 


) 


299 19 


393 91 


693 10 


586 03 


xvoyaiston . . 


645 44 






- 






fi4H 44 
OIO ** 


Russell 


2 48 














2,533 48 


Rutland . 


654 57 














654 57 


Salem 


^ 000 00 














5,000 00 


Salisbury 


1 222 22 










z oo 




1 OOO OO 


Sandis6eld 


OwU 017 














300 59 


Sandwich 


1,088 36 


1.601 37 


( Q1 4H 
1 ol to 

{ *92 55 


1 


500 00 


1,619 40 


2,119 40 


1,088 36 


oaugus . . . 


4.572 32 


- 




i 




- 


- 


-TO OO 

4,572 32 




131 07 














131 07 


Scituate 


4,401 05 














4 401 05 


Seekonk . 


1,775 15 














1J75 15 


Sharon . 


2 222 03 














2,222 03 


onemeiQ . . 


664 61 














664 61 


Shelburne ■ 


1 OR 






J 








1 OOQ OQ 
1,000 US 


Sherborn 


729 26 


549 52 


( *?^0 fi9 
1 OOU OZ 

\ *qq An 
^ c>y ou 


— 


1,189 47 


1,009 73 


729 26 


ooiney . . . 


1,244 44 




_ 






1,244 44 


Shrewsbury . ■ 


2 509 55 








- 






2,509 55 


Shutesbury . 


193 56 


56 50 


R7 ho 










193 56 


Somerset . . 


2,035 39 














o no= on 

z,\j6o o» 


Somerville 


5^000 00 














O.UvJU UU 


CUuLU naUJCj* • 


3,362 54 














o,oOZ o4 


Southampton 


403 02 














403 02 


Srn 1 1 Vi H nrni l atYi 


1 =«07 fifi 




_ 






1 H "7A 
10 i\i 




1,0U/ OO 


Southbridge • • 


5,000 00 














- AAA AO 

o,uuu uu 


Southwick • 


927 80 


- 


- 






- 


- 


927 80 


Spencer 


2,148 01 










— 


*" 


2,148 01 


Springfield 


5,000 00 














5 000 00 


Sterhng . 


712 88 










7 1 H 
< lO 




712 88 


Stockbridge . 


2 514 39 














2,514 39 


Stoneham ■ . 


4,372 54 








- 






4,372 54 


Stoughton 


3 4fiQ 4Q 
















Stow 


834 30 


1,303 56 


I OO OO 
1 1 fiO 


j 


415 12 


— 


415 12 


834 30 


oturoricige • • 


721 72 




[ Oil ou 










721 72 


Sudbury . 


983 40 














983 40 


Sunderland • • 


644 64 














644 64 


Snttnn 

OUllUIl . . • 


1,058 32 














1,058 32 


Swampscott > . 


5!000 00 


- 








- 


- 


K AAA AA 

o,vw UU 


Swansea . • • 


1,513 48 














1,513 48 


Taunton . a 


5,000 00 














C AAA AA 

o.UUU uo 


Templeton 


1,903 53 














1,903 53 


Tewksbury 


1,480 27 


1,625 31 


668 25 




145 04 


447 78 


592 82 


1,480 27 


Tisbury . 


1,824 75 














1,824 75 


Tolland . 


191 47 














191 47 


Topsfield. 


1,279 56 














1,279 56 



* Lead sold 



36 



P.D. 73 



Cities and Towns 


1926 


1927 


Required 
Expendi- 
ture 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Townsend 


$1,121 


61 


_ 


_ 


_ 




$9 85 


_ 


$1,121 61 


Truro 


410 


28 


$808 62 


$45 25 


$325 50 




99 74 


$425 24 


410 28 


Tyngsborough 


567 


81 


1,230 31 


47 40 


565 41 




292 13 


857 54 


567 81 


Tyringham 


223 


24 












223 24 


Upton 


669 


88 




_ 


_ 




_ 


669 88 


Uxbridge . 


3,965 


12 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


3,965 12 


Wakefield 


5,000 


00 


_ 




_ 






_ 


5,000 00 


Wales 


227 


00 


_ 


_ 


_ 






_ 


227 00 


Walpole . 


5,000 


00 


_ 


_ 


_ 








5,000 00 


Waltham 


5,000 


00 


_ 


_ 


_ 






5,000 00 


Ware 


4,741 


57 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


4,741 57 


Wareham 


4,904 


70 


_ 




_ 




_ 


4,904 70 


Warren . 


2,640 


13 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


2,640 13 


Warwick 


263 


43 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


263 43 


Washington . 


116 


88 


_ 


_ 






_ 


116 88 


Watertown 


5,000 


00 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


5,000 00 


Wayland 


1,958 


77 


- 


- 


- 


9 10 


- 


1,958 77 


Webster . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Wellesley 


5,000 


00 


_ 


_ 






_ 


5,000 00 


Wellfleet 


505 


77 


1,024 11 


163 78 


491 70 


297 06 


788 76 


505 77 


w enaen • . . 


512 


14 












512 14 


Wenham 


1,364 


56 


■ f _ 






1 75 


_ 


1,364 56 


West Boylston 


685 


16 


_ 


_ 




61 22 


_ 


685 16 


West Bridgewater 


1,140 


72 


1,791 07 


/ 521 00 
\ *48 86 


} 500 00 


454 88 


954 88 


1,140 72 


West Brookfield . 


681 


92 


_ 










_ 


681 92 


West Newbury 


485 


02 


663 49 


J 161 60 
t *129 75 


} 


178 47 


231 33 


409 80 


485 02 


TVest Springfield 


5,000 


00 


_ 










_ 


5.000 00 


West Stockbridge . 


594 


07 




_ 








_ 


594 07 


West Tisbury. 


366 


92 


_ 


_ 






_ 


366 92 


Westborough . 


1,762 


81 


_ 


_ 








1,762 81 


Westfield 


5,000 


00 


_ 


_ 










> V 


5.000 00 


Westford. 


2,442 


46 


_ 


_ 








8 88 


— 


2,442 46 


W^esthampton . 


172 


93 




_ 










_ 


172 93 


Westminster . 


584 


29 




_ 






18 35 


_ 


584 29 


"Weston . . . 


3,494 


66 


_ 


_ 








_ 


3,494 66 


WVstport 


2,712 


62 


f .1 


_ 








_ 


2,712 62 


Westwood 


1,671 


13 


j _ 


_ 








_ 


1,671 13 


Weymouth 


5,000 


00 


_ 


_ 








_ 


5,000 00 


Whateley 


638 


20 


_ 


_ 








_ 


638 20 


Whitman 


3,729 


78 


_ 


_ 










3,729. 78 


Wilbraham 


1,616 


38 


_ 


_ 








_ 


1,616 38 


Williamsburg 


841 


61 


_ 


_ 










_ 


841 61 


W^illiamstown . 


3,126 


96 


_ 


_ 












3,126 96 


Wilmington 


1,277 


65 


1,240 18 


624 06 








479 11 


441 64 


1,277 $5 


Winchendon . 


3.295 


34 




_ 










3,295 34 


Winchester 


5,000 


00 


- 


- 










— 


5,000 00 


Windsor . . . 


202 


69 
















202 69 


"Winthrop • • 


5,000 


00 
















5,000 00 


Woburn . 


5,000 


00 
















5,080 00 


Worcester 


5,000 


00 
















5,000 00 


Worthington . 


268 


48 
















268 48 


Wrentham 


1,276 


22 
















1,276 22 


Yarmouth 


1,291 


56 


1,131 50 


137 50 






356 47 


196 41 


1,291 56 



* Lead sold 



Public Document 



o f7r 
No. 



/?J2 7 

Commontoealtft of jfWaaaacfjuaetta ^ 
ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

Commissioner of Conservation 

AND 

State Forester 

FOR THE 

Year Ending November 30, 1927 
yVlAstAs', ; Department of Conservation 




Publication op this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Financi 
l,500-4-'28. No. 1872 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Forest Conservation y 3 

Conservation of Wild Life • 3 

Conservation of the Health of Domestic Animals 4 

Standish Monument Reservation 4 

State Forests — Purchases 4 

Division of Forestry Report 6 

Organization • 6 

Extension Forestry • 6 

Woodlot Examinations 6 

Exhibits 7 

Lectures 

Forest Survey 7 

Forest Plantations 8 

Q 

Nurseries 

White Pine Blister Rust 9 

State Forests— Development 10 

Report of Forester in Western Massachusetts 13 

Report of State Fire Warden 18 

Report of Superintendent of Moth Work 24 

Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts 26 

Appendix: Financial Statements 27 



OUTLINE OF REPORT 

This report is divided for convenience and economy into four parts:— 
Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of Con- 
servation. 

Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 

Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume as Public Document No. 73. 

Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 25. 

Part IT is printed in a separate volume as Public Document Xo. 98. 



tl&e Commontoealtf) of fWastfatfjusttW 

Part I 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CONSERVATION 

n,;7f^ an n Ua - rep t v, rt 0f * he Department of Conservation is herewith sub- 
SSrs^M 

^m^ot^cZ^Z The records of these « 

i ha ™ cooperated with the United States Department of Agriculture 
iorestry Service, m extension forestry work, nursery work, and forest fire 

S S re - C T« g ted6Tal &iA < on a11 these lines of ™ rk = ™& the United 
£ H f?}?? K n Surve y A m . enforcement of the game laws; and with the 

cJda^attle &1 Industr y in re e ard to elimination of tuber- 

H^ have / ls ° C0 -?Perated with the State Departments of Agriculture and 
HeaUh, and a special jomt report of the Department of ConL-vation and 
the Department of Health in regard to the feasibility of transplanting sheU- 

d£ ument No 252°) *° ***** ****** P ™ W ^ H »« 

Forest Conservation. 

„3^ importaut * hat we> as Americans, should realize fullv the debt nf 
gratitude we owe to our forefathers for their mighty labors and sacrifi™, faf 
developing this great and prosperous nation Our sratiful ^2 ^ 
demonstrated by our efforts to so conserve our natural resources t^e use or 

2se h d,Xtt ttr2 u o r f f^^^^w?^^ 

t i? f i he outstan <iing natural resources of our country is th« f™> e * 
I*wis E. Pearson, president of the Chamber of ConWerc7of thP TlTtl' 

He said: Forests cover a greater area than all the cultivated farms 
industries dependent on them rank fourth in the nat on Th JS wool ? u 
sustains many communities, stimulates all industry. Where ZfrAn Jnrtt 
still are harvested, business is active- where tW h fl v7ZnT g 1 f s 

It is pleasing to state that in Massachusetts from year to year thar* 

Conservation of Wild Life. 
The Division of Fisheries and Game was administered alone- mnoh 
-me hnes as m previous years with the exception of a change ™ r 6 

»f propagating and distributing stock. As ^^t ta^^Z^J 01107 
•ral years ago, trout are now planted in smaller"^ 



4 



P.D. 73 



Only a few fingerlings, culled-out stock, are distributed. Likewise progress 
has been made in carrying over all pheasants hatched in a given year, to be 
liberated the following year as adult birds. Public interest in the Division 
is on the increase, as evidenced by the substantial gifts of lands and waters 
to be wild life sanctuaries, and of moneys for the purchase of lands and the 
development of the game farms and fish hatcheries. 

The increasing demands for the assistance of the law-enforcement officers 
of the Division to protect the public health through excluding diggers from 
the contaminated shellfish areas, can only be met by increasing the number of 
wardens. The addition of a third deputy inspector of fish has enlarged our 
usefulness in protecting the public against the sale of fish unfit for food, and 
is of benefit to the industry by improving the quality of the product brought 
from the fishing grounds. 

In 1926, for the first time in the history of the State, the revenues from 
the sporting licenses and fines exceeded the total appropriation for all the 
work of the Division. Such income for the present year exceeded that of 
the previous year by $16,978.30. This denotes a larger participation in 
field sports and the willingness to contribute toward the maintenance and 
upbuilding of such sports. 

For the work in detail, reference is made to the report of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game. 

Conservation of the Health of Domestic Animals 

The prevention, suppression, and when possible the extirpation of con- 
tagious diseases of domestic animals is the function of the Division of Animal 
Industry, and is of tremendous economic value to the agricultural and dairy 
interests of the State as well as helping to safeguard the public health. 

The detailed report of the Division printed in separate form shows that 
the service without charge in prevention and cure of hog cholera has been 
extended to cover 18% more treatments than last year, a total of 114.019. 

In the eradication of bovine tuberculosis an increase of 33 1-3% in the 
number of animals voluntarily submitted to the test with an actual reduc- 
tion of 30% in reactors indicates the elimination of the "fake" or false 
owner test and a return of confidence in the test on the part of the honest 
cattle owners. 

An alarming increase in the positive cases of rabies reported in October 
and November justified drastic action in the infected area. Accordingly, 
after a conference November 29th attended by some fifty health and police 
officials in the Metropolitan District, this Division advised the proper 
authorities of seventy-one cities and towns that all dogs (the common carrier 
of this dread disease) be muzzled or restrained from running at large for a 
period of ninety days. This recommendation was promptly adopted by 
seventy cities and towns and the "restraint or muzzle" order is now being 
vigorously enforced in most communities. The difficulty in securing 100% 
co-operation warrants the recommendation that our dog laws be revised. 

Standish Monument Reservation. 

During the summer of 1927, 109,100 persons visited the Standish Monu- 
ment at Duxbury. There were visitors from every State in the Union and 
from more foreign countries than ever before. Of this number of visitors 
7,276 ascended the tower, paying to the State $727.60 for this privilege. 
This figure is somewhat less than last year, owing to the fog which shut off 
the view on an unusual number of days. 

State Forests. 

During the year 1927 only such land has been purchased as had been 
contracted for in 1926, or such lots included in the takings as we could secure 
titles on from time to time. A total of 3,707.6124 acres was purchased, 
distributed as follows: 



D. 73 

Name of Forest 
Barre 

Blandford . 
Brimfield . 
Conway 
Foxborough 
Hawley 
Leominster . 
Marthas Vineyard 
Mohawk Trail 
Monroe 
Pittsfield 
Sandisfield . 
Savoy Mountain . 
Shawme 
Spencer 
Sutton . 

Tolland-Granville 
Wendell 



Acres 
115.625 
315.3 
446.64 

74. 
280.8562 
608. 

60.0625 
173.7 
146. 

86. 

73.3 
212. 
505. 

36.6687 

25.4 

28.21 
105.25 
415.6 



Total 3,707.6124 

Recommendations. 

Recommendations for legislation regarding the Division of Animal In- 
dustry will be found in the annual report of that division, and for the Divi- 
sion of Fisheries and Game, in the annual report of the Division of Fisheries 
and Game. 



6 



P.D. 73 



Part II 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

The work of the Forestry Division has been carried on as usual, the work 
of advice and assistance to the public in tree planting and forest manage- 
ment progressing well. The forest extension work, partially financed by 
the Federal Government, has increased and is proving very helpful. 

Organization. 

William A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner and State Forester 
Charles O. Bailey, Secretary 
Harold O. Cook, Chief Forester 

D. C. A. Galarneau, Forester in Western Massachusetts 
Frank L. Haynes, Forester, Land Purchase 
James Morris, Forester, Nurseries 

Robert B. Parmenter, Assistant Forester, Mapping and Reforestation 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden 
George A. Smith, Chief Moth Suppressor 
John P. Crowe, Supervising Fire Warden 



District Fire Wardens 

1. James E. Moloy, Woburn 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River 

3. William Day, Wareham 

4. Charles L. Woodman, Manchaug 

5. Albert R. Ordway, WestfieJd 

6. Joseph L. Peabody, Winchendon 

7. Verne J. Fitzroy, Savoy 

8. Lincoln Crowell, Sandwich 



District Moth Suppressors 

1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly 

2. Charles E. Mace, Bolton 

3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill 

4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Foxboro 

5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay 

6. Harry B. Ramsey, Worcester 

7. Grover C. Twiss, Holyoke 



Extension Forestry. 

Work in extension forestry, which was started in 1925, has been carried 
on with gratifying results. Many of the small woodland owners who for- 
merly knew nothing of the value of their property, are now looking at it 
from a different point of view. They are considering it a crop woodlot 
instead of a mine woodlot. Two foresters of this department, Mr. Cook 
and Mr. Parmenter, act as the extension specialists in forestry. Mr. Par- 
menter gives most of his time to this type of work, meeting the county 
agents and arranging demonstration meetings, lectures and establishing 
boys' clubs, instructing them in forestry and also making a great many 
woodlot examinations. 

In connection with the work three demonstration areas were established 
in Middlesex County to show the small woodland owner what methods are 
best to be practised on his own land. Meetings were held at which groups 
of from six to twenty-five were present. It is necessary that these demon- 
strations be held, the plots laid out, and personal visits made in order to 
thoroughly arouse the public to the value of the farm woodlot. 

Woodlot Examinations. - 

A great deal of general information on the care of woodland can be spread 
through lectures, letters, bulletins and personal interviews at the office, but 
since every acre of woodland represents a separate problem it is practically 
necessary for the forester to meet the owner on his property and discuss 
the methods of improving his land. During the past year we have had 77 
such calls, examining 8,845 acres. The total number represents a varied 
program and also shows that interest in woodland by the owners is increas- 
ing. Work that is carried on from the office in Boston and also from the 
office in Springfield is charged for on the basis of traveling expenses, while 



P.D. 73 7 

for the work that is arranged for through the county agents and extension 
service, at which a demonstration is held and a club of friends and neighbors 
invited, there is no charge. 

Listed below are the examples and demonstrations made during the past 
year classified according to the problem involved. 



Problem 
Improvement Cutt 
Insects 
Disease 
Planting 
General 
Thinning 
Estimate 
Fire Damage 



ng 



Number 


Acres 


. 12 


942 


. 5 


1 


. 9 


71 


. 29 


4,479 


. 15 


832 


. 2 


185 


. 3 


330 


. 2 


2,005 


77 


8,845 



Exhibits. 

Last winter the Forestry Division had a large exhibit at the Sportsmen 
Show in Mechanics Building, Boston. This exhibit was arranged especially 
to show the destructive effects of forest fires on wild life, but other phases of 
forest conservation were shown. We had our usual large exhibit at the East- 
ern States Exposition at Springfield in September. In November there 
was another exhibit in Springfield at the time of the meeting of the New 
England Council. State Foresters from all New England supplied material, 
but this department shouldered the responsibility of putting it up and caring 
for it. Small exhibits were made at the Northampton Fair, Oxford Fair, 
at the fall meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and at an 
exhibition held under the auspices of the Rhode Island Hospital Trust, in 
Providence, Rhode Island. 

Lectures. 

Requests for lectures on the part of granges, women's clubs, luncheon 
clubs and kindred organizations were not as numerous as in some previous 
years, for which we are not altogether sorry, because it is not easy for men 
who are busy in the regular administrative duties of a department to find 
time for such activities. Forty-seven lectures were given by various mem- 
bers of the department. During American Forest Week nightly radio talks 
from Station WBZ were made by various members of this department and 
others prominent in conservation work in this state. 

The following meetings outside of the state were attended by representa- 
tives of the department: 

American Fish and Game Protective Association, New York. 

State Parks Conference, Bear Mt., New York. 

New England Foresters, Waterville, N. H. 

Association of State Foresters, Hartford, Conn. 

American Forestry Association, New Haven, Conn. 

Forest Survey. 

The land and timber survey which this department has been carrying on 
for the past few years was continued during the past summer by forestry 
students under the supervision of one of the assistant foresters. The 
eastern half of Middlesex County was finished and the entire county of 
Barnstable was completed. A great deal of valuable information about old 
plantations was gathered on Cape Cod. Also valuable data on the forest 
3onditions of Cape Cod were obtained and many natural growths of timber 
were found. 

The information compiled from these surveys is extremely valuable from 
ime to time in laying out forestry work in the various counties. The de- 
partment is also able to give information to the numerous inquirers who 



8 



P.D. 73 



come to this office, in regard to forest land, agricultural land, stands of 
timber, and other subjects of similar nature. 

Forest Plantations. 

No new reforestation lots were planted in 1927, since the Reforestation 
Act has seemed to have passed its experimental stage; but a number of the 
old lots had been either burned over or contained areas where trees had 
died, so that planting was done on five of these lots. During the spring 
45,000 trees were planted. So far the plantations are living and apparently 
flourishing. 

Liberation or release cutting has been done on five lots, ribes eradicated 
from nine lots, brush has been burned on a number of the lots, new roads 
have been opened up for use in fire protection, and on the Chestnut Hill lot 
in Spencer we have sold some 200 or 300 Christmas trees this past year. 
The eradication of ribes is absolutely necessary in order to protect the young 
pine which we have planted, and also to give the neighbors an incentive to 
eradicate the ribes on their own property. We thoroughly recommend to 
all purchasers of white pine that they look over their land very thoroughly 
before doing any planting and eradicate all the ribes that are found. If this 
work is done, we can promise success, but if it is neglected, the chances of 
success are diminished. The following list of lots shows the type of work 
that has been accomplished, the location of the lot, and in some cases the 



size of the lot. 

Release Cutting. 

Name of Lot Location No. of Acres 

Lynde Westminster 39 

Shapleigh-Peckens Ashburnham 32 

Baker Bridgewater 59 

Rockwood Ashburnham 130 

French North Lancaster 50 

Planting. 

Name of Lot Location Trees Planted 

Simpkins Yarmouth 2,000 

Perry Falmouth 9,000 

Leonard Raynham 10,000 

Town of Berkley Berkley 4,000 

Pierce Taunton 20,000 

Blister Rust Protection. 
Name of Lot Location Ribes Eradicated 

Coughlin Ashburnham 1,200 

Houston Brook Ashburnham 150,000 

French Hubbardston* 

Fiske Buckland 486 

Pond Leyden 98 

Baker Box Co Rutland and Barre* 

Chestnut Hill Spencer 949 

Rockwood Ashburnham 200,000 

Clark Holden* 

Miscellaneous Work. 

Name of Lot Location Kind of Work 

Blanchard Princeton Brush disposal 

Clark Paxton Road building 

Chestnut Hill .... Spencer Getting out Christmas trees 



* These three lots were covered, but the number of ribes eradicated i» 

unknown. 



P.D. 73 



9 



The results shown prove conclusively that all work of this nature is abso- 
lutely necessary in order to bring these reforestation lots to an early maturity 
and build up valuable timber rather than the scrub and second quality box 
lumber that is now being produced while letting nature take its course. 

Nurseries. 

During the shipping season of 1927 over three and one-half million young 
trees were shipped from the State nursery. These trees had been all trans- 
planted and consisted mainly of what is called our four year transplant stock. 
Distribution was as follows: 



Sale 1,538,612 

State Institutions 445,900 

Town Forests 308,250 

State Forests 1,152,750 

Reforestation Lots 70,125 



3,515,637 

Following our usual custom we have included in the above total the ship- 
ments made from nurseries during the preceding fall. 

The need for maintaining a nursery at Savoy has passed, and accordingly 
the Savoy nursery has been discontinued. 

The new Clinton nursery has been enlarged and now contains approxi- 
mately two and three-quarter million transplants, of which at least one and 
one-quarter million will be dug and shipped next spring. This will be the 
first shipping season at Clinton and this nursery will be enlarged until it 
has an annual production of well over three million trees. 

A new reservation nursery with an estimated annual production of 200,000 
transplants has been opened at Shawme State Forest in Sandwich. This 
nursery is located on the State road connecting Sandwich with Mashpee. 
The stock from this nursery for the present will be used exclusively on the 
reservation. 

The principal species produced in all nurseries are white pine, red pine, 
Norway spruce, white spruce and Scotch pine, and the total content of all 
nurseries is now approximately nineteen million. 

White Pine Blister Rust. 
By C. C. Perry, Department of Agriculture. 

During the fiscal year 1927, the Division of Plant Pest Control, of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture, continued with the campaign to 
prevent the further spread of the white pine blister rust. This project is 
being carried on as an educational and service campaign and is designed to 
secure the co-operation of all property owners in the prompt and efficient 
elimination of all currant and gooseberry bushes that may be a menace to 
valuable stands of white pine. Property owners are actively co-operating 
in this control work, and during the field season 1,973 individuals assisted 
in the examination of 293,369 acres of land. Upon the area examined, 
683,156 wild and 31,753 cultivated currant and gooseberry bushes were 
found and uprooted. 

On April 1, 1927, the Department of Agriculture issued an order, pro- 
hibiting the further cultivation of the so-called European Black Currant, 
on account of its unusual susceptibility to the blister rust. Persons in 
possession of such plants were urged to destroy them at once in order to 
prevent the possible development of new centers or sources of infection. 
Blister rust has been found on white pines in 236 townships in Massachusetts 
since 1909. In the spring of 1927 there was an unusual development of the 
disease on pines, and with the exceptionally moist conditions which pre- 
vailed during the summer, it is quite certain that there was a marked spread 
of the disease in areas where the currants and gooseberries have not as yet 
been eliminated. 



10 P.D. 73 

State Forests. 

The work of maintaining and developing the state forests was continued 
during the year as far as our funds permitted. The department is handi- 
capped by the fact that it is able only to maintain crews on the larger and 
more valuable forests, with the result that the smaller state forests are 
neglected. We need in each of the four western districts a mobile crew 
housed in portable camps which can be put to work on areas now being 
neglected. 

The increase in the number of gasoline pumping outfits for fighting forest 
fires now available for our district wardens has made it advisable to con- 
struct "water holes" at convenient places where these pumps can be set to 
work. A water hole may be an abandoned well, a hole dug in a swamp, or 
a natural pool in a running brook. These water holes are made accessible by 
forest roads or trails and their location designated by appropriate signs. 
They serve the same purpose as a fire hydrant on a city street. 

We were fortunate during the year in selling a considerable amount of 
timber and cordwood from the various forests. It is interesting to note 
some of the sources of income on state forest lands, for not only is there 
timber and cordwood, but blueberries, ferns, press brush, Christmas trees 
and other products, each of which adds its bit to the general income. 

Barre Forest. Much improvement cutting has been accomplished by 
allowing townspeople to go in and cut the poor trees, charging them at the 
rate of $1 per cord. Fifty-seven cords of trash wood and some dead chest- 
nut posts were taken out in this way. Ten thousand poplar cuttings were 
set in an old field on the Harding Hill Lot and this lot also had the ribes 
bushes cut out as a protection against white pine blister rust. 

Bash Bish Forest. The beautiful waterfall, Bash Bish Falls, is on state 
forest land in Massachusetts, but the approach to it is from New York 
State through land belonging to the Taconic Park Commission. This com- 
mission has closed up the old road leading to the falls, which was excessively 
narrow and unsafe for auto travel. They have constructed at considerable 
expense a parking space for sixty autos one-half mile below the falls and from 
this parking space have constructed a foot trail to the falls, not stopping 
when they reached the state line. This department is indebted to the 
Taconic State Park Commission for the great improvements which they 
have made and are making in the vicinity of Bash Bish Falls and which 
are of benefit both to the people of New York and Massachusetts. 

Beartown Forest. About 14,000 Norway spruce were planted on this 
forest. A foot trail four miles long was built from Swann Forest Lodge to 
the summit of Mt. Wilcox on the north side and down to the old South 
Lee road on the west. This trail is not only a boon to the people of Great 
Barrington and vicinity who wish to make a mountain hike, hut opens up 
a large area in the interior of this forest which heretofore has been inacces- 
sible even for foot travel. 

Campbell Falls Reservation. Our men have done some work in clearing 
out the trail leading to the foot of the falls and cut out some of the under- 
growth so that a better view of the falls can be obtained. The town of 
Norfolk (Conn.) has improved and widened the public road leading to the 
falls. 

Colrain Forest. Very little work was done on this forest during 1927. A 
few days' work was spent in mowing weeds and brush along the main forest 
roads. 

Conway Forest. About three miles of roads were repaired on this forest. 

Erving Forest. Thinning work was done in a mixed stand of hardwoods, 
pine and hemlock. All the poorer hardwoods, most of which were dead 
chestnut, were cut out, resulting in the cutting of seventy cords of wood. 
Ninety thousand trees were shipped from the nursery and 103,000 seedlings 
transplanted in their place. During the spring this crew fought fires in 
Enfield, Wendell, Northfield, Erving, Orange and Athol. Some repairs 
were made on the headquarters house, the roof shingled, and new sills and 
timbers placed in the barn. Repairs were made to Laurel Lake road. 



P.D. 73 



11 



During the fall the crew usually employed here worked on Mt. Grace forest 
and gathered pine cones. 

Foxborough Forest. About twenty acres which was burned over in 1925 
was cleared of dead trees and brush, with a resulting product of sixty cords 
of dead and half -burned wood. During the fall the Camp Fire Girls planted 
3,000 trees on a portion of this area so cleared. 

Harold Parker Forest. During the winter a tract of about twenty acres 
which had been severely burned was cleared of dead wood and brush and 
put into condition to plant. During the summer and fall roadsides and fire 
lines were cleared of brush and forest roads improved by the removal of rocks, 
and swampy stretches filled in with corduroy and gravel. Plantings of 
3,500 white pines were made. The state forest crew worked on six fires in 
nearby towns. 

Leominster Forest. A crew was employed on this forest for only a few 
weeks' time. They cleared out brush on both sides of an abandoned town 
road for about three miles. There are many forest roads on this reservation 
which need similar attention. 

Marthas Vineyard Forest. The fire hazard on this forest is extremely 
high and the plan is to cut up the entire area into blocks about one-half mile 
square by fire lines fifty feet wide. These fire lines are cleared of brush 
and on either side strips ten feet wide are plowed and harrowed. During 
the past year about two miles of such line have been constructed and com- 
pleted in part. Reforestation work included the planting of 150,000 Scotch 
and 10,000 Jack pines. The small cottage which has been used as a head- 
quarters has been reconstructed by the addition of two rooms and a water 
system operated by a gasoline pump installed. A telephone has also been 
put in. 

Mohawk Trail Forest. During the winter 70,000 feet of soft and hardwood 
logs and 36 cords of wood were cut. In the spring 20,000 spruce and red 
pine from Totem Nursery were set in the Botinelli flat and the Phelps pas- 
ture. We transplanted 43,000 seedlings in the Totem Nursery. A new 
lessee for the Trail Camp store has been found who promises to be better 
than the former lessee. In order to give him more room to store supplies, 
an addition was built to the camp store made from lumber salvaged from 
abandoned houses on the forest. On account of construction work on the 
Trail auto traffic was not so great as in previous years and not as many cars 
stopped to use the camp grounds. 

Monroe Forest. Ten thousand trees were planted on this forestf 

Mount Grace Forest. During the winter one man worked at release cut- 
ting in a mixed stand of natural pines and grey birch. The remaining dead 
chestnut on this forest was sold to an operator who cut about 200,000 feet 
in the form of lumber and ties, while about 60,000 feet of mature white birch, 
which had been severely injured by the ice storm of 1921, was sold to an- 
other operator. Our own crew salvaged 140 small telephone poles for our 
own use from chestnut not cut by the operator. 

Myles Standish Forest. Nearly five miles of new roads and fire lines were 
constructed in the northwest section of the forest which heretofore has 
been inadequately protected. On thirteen miles of fire lines and roads 
brush was mowed and burned and five miles of fire lines partially com- 
pleted the previous year were plowed and harrowed. A new road around 
Fearings Pond to accommodate campers was started. 

Plantings of 253,000 trees, Scotch, red and Austrian pines, were made 
and 283,000 seedlings transplanted into the nursery. The fence of barbed 
wire put around the nursery last year to keep out the deer proved inadequate 
and was replaced with woven wire. 

Weevil infested shoots in the older white pine plantations were removed 
and burned and two and one-half acres of twelve-year-old plantation were 
pruned as an experiment. A#new General Motors Company fire truck was 
installed on the forest and this necessitated some alterations in the barn. 
Minor repairs were made in the headquarters house. The crew served at 
two large fires in neighboring towns in the spring. 



12 



P.D. 73 



Oakham Forest. On the Butler and Potter lots grey birch and poplar 
growing among stands of young pines were cut to release the latter and to 
permit them to grow. These two lots were also protected from blister rust 
by the eradication of currant and gooseberry bushes. 

October ML Forest. Seventeen miles of forest roads were brushed out, 
five of which have not been brushed out before. Cinders and gravel were 
hauled to the main road up the mountain and to the Becket road and twelve 
steel culverts furnished by the towns of Washington and Lee were put in 
place. The flood of November 4 did serious damage to the main mountain 
road. It carried out three bridges and washed out the road badly in many 
places. The town of Lee is paying for the repair of this road in the section 
where most injury was done. 

About five acres of medium hardwoods were thinned, cutting out the 
cordwood and approximately 20,000 feet of ash logs were cut on the Scher- 
merhorn place, the tops being cut into cord wood, and some release cutting 
was done in a mixed stand of spruce. Planting was done during the fall 
with 60,000 four-year spruce and 5,000 white pine. The French house, so- 
called, was repaired and put in condition for occupancy and minor repairs 
made at headquarters. 

Otter River Forest. During the spring 210,000 trees were planted on the 
land burned over in the spring of 1926. From the nursery 367,000 trees 
were taken out and 495,000 seedlings put in. During the summer most of 
the time of the regular crew of three men was occupied in maintaining the 
nursery. In the fall forest roads were brushed out. some pieces gravelled, 
water holes cleaned and pine cones gathered. During the spring fire season 
this crew assisted in fighting fires in Winchendon, Templeton, Royalston, 
Gardner and Townsend. 

Savoy Mountain Forest. During the winter fifty cords of wood from trees 
which had been badly damaged by the ice storm of 1921 were cut. During 
the spring 150,000 spruce and 11,000 pine were set on open land. About 
forty old wells were located, opened up and fenced to use as a source of 
water in case of fires. The old Banas house was torn down and several old 
buildings burned. 

Shawme Forest. A large percentage of the work on this forest consists in 
the construction and maintenance of fire lines. About two miles of 50-foot 
fire lines were brushed out for the first time, while on two and one-half miles 
of such line 10-foot strips on either side were cleared of stumps, plowed and 
harrowed. About four miles of fire line previously plowed were harrowed 
for the first time. About twenty-three miles of forest roads were cleared 
of brush to make them passable by automobile. Twenty-eight thousand 
trees were planted. The nursery was enlarged by transplanting 390,000 
two-year seedlings and the grounds around it improved by seeding to grass 
and planting of shrubs. 

A ton and a half fire truck has been installed in this forest, fitted with a 
Fitzhenry-Guptill pump and 3,000 feet of hose. There were no fires on the 
forest, but the crew fought eight fires in surrounding Cape Cod towns. 

Spencer Forest. A mixed stand of hardwoods on the Young property was 
thinned by selling the poorer trees as marked, mostly birch, red maple and 
white oak, to local people who paid from fifty cents to one dollar per cord for 
the wood which they cut. The purchasers are required to pile the brush 
and not to injure the young pine reproduction. It is planned to set out 
openings not stocked with natural pine with nursery stock. A road was cut 
into the meadow pond on this lot so that the water will be accessible for fire 
protection. Ten thousand poplar cuttings were set in an old mowing lot. 

On the Chestnut Hill lot some 200 balsam firs planted about twelve years 
ago and which are being badly crowded by planted pines were cut out and 
sold for Christmas trees at from 35 to 75 cents each. More will be taken out 
this year. The road to Thompson Pond wa^ cleared out for fire protection 
purposes and all ribes on the lot eradicated as a protection against blister 
rust. Nineteen infected pines were found. 

Swann Forest. Plantings of 5,500 Norway spruce and 500 white ash were 



P.D. 73 



13 



made on this forest. Improvement cuttings and thinnings were made in 
about fifteen acres of hardwoods and three acres of large pine. A release 
cutting was made in a six-acre plantation of eleven-year-old pines. Leaders 
infested with pine weevil were cut and burned in 75 acres of plantations. 
About five miles of forest roads were mowed out as a part of the annual 
maintenance. The main road to the Lodge suffered severely from heavy 
rains in the summer and fall and required more than the usual amount of 
repairing. Minor building repairs were made and one unused barn on the 
Winters place was torn down. 

Tolland-Granville Forest. Release cutting was done on about thirty-five 
acres of grey birch and planted pines. Brush and poor trees along main 
road were trimmed and fourteen miles of forest road and four miles of tele- 
phone line were brushed out. The headquarters house was painted, the 
roof on the McGrannis place repaired and the old barn torn down. Twenty 
thousand trees were planted. 

Wendell Forest. The only work of consequence on this forest was the 
planting of 66,000 trees by the Erving crew on the Coolidge lot. 

Windsor Forest. The hemlock grove near the gorge was thinned out and 
trimmed up to make it more accessible and to enhance the view; four new 
fireplaces were built and twelve new tables and seats installed. A trail was 
cut and a bridge built leading to the spring so that visitors can have an 
ample supply of water. The road in to Windsor Jams was surfaced with 
gravel. 

Area of the State Forests, November 30, 1927. 



Name of Forest 


Acres 


Name of Forest 


Acres 


Arthur Warton Swann . 


986.75 


Oakham 


800.55 


Ashburnham . 


1,078.075 


October Mountain 


13,652.6 


Barre 


349.125 


Otis 


2,771.81 


Bash Bish 


390.08 


Otter River 


1,812.46 


Beartown 


7,399.93 


Oxford 


28.7 


Blandford 


1,734.8 


Peru . 


1,588. 


Brim field . 


910.14 


Petersham . 


248.15 


Clarksburg 


1,764. 


Pittsfield 


1,155.84 


Colrain 


1,206.194 


Sandisfield . 


4,210.76 


Conway 


1,563.12 


Savoy Mountain 


7,621.98 


Erving 


4,431.565 


Shawme 


*8,422.12 


Foxborough 


662.2412 


Shutesbury 


638.36 


Harold Parker. 


1,327.6 


Spencer 


650.525 


Hawley 


2,131. 


Sutton 


262.7715 


Hubbardston 


724.37 


Templeton . 


377.5 


Leominster 


1,636.2563 


Tolland-Granville 


4,682.25 


Marthas Vineyard . 


♦4,472.75 


Warwick 


960.45 


Mohawk Trail. 


5,419.6 


Wendell 


4,667.46 


Monroe . 


2,848.57 


Westminster 


335.12 


Mount Grace . 


. 1,065.825 


Windsor 


1,450.05 


Myles Standish 


. *8,869. 


Worthington 


225. 


Northfield 


235.4875 


Unassigned 


1,093.325 


Total 






108,863.2605 



Report of the Forester in Western Massachusetts. 
Mr. W. A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — The following is a detailed report of the forestry work conducted 
through the West Springfield office of the Forestry Division during the fiscal 
year ending November 30, 1927. 

The Forestry Division has had its western office in the Hampden County 
Improvement League Building at West Springfield. With the approval of 



♦Includes takings. 



14 



P.D. 73 



its president, Mr. H. A. Moses, the League continues to provide, without 

charge, office space, stenographic service, and telephone. 

The work conducted from this office is divided between forestry on state 
forests and extension forestry. The work on state forests has been cur- 
tailed, due to reduced appropriations, while the demand for extension co- 
operation has increased over previous years. 

The force connected with this office consists of myself in charge under 
instruction from the Chief Forester in Boston and one permanent man, 
R. M. Hick. Forest and Type Surveyor, working under my direction and 
supervision. Other help, as required, has been engaged for limited periods. 
In the fall of 1926. Mr. Hick was granted a leave of absence effective from 
October 1. 1926. to June 15. 1927. to take up advanced work in forestry at 
the Harvard Forest. His absence necessarily limited the amount of work 
accomplished here. 

WORK OX STATE FORESTS 

There are now 44 state forests, with a total area of 108.863.26 acres, of 
which 3.707.61 acres were purchased during the year. There were added 
2.987.09 acres of the newly acquired lands to the 1 1 forests in the western 
district. At present 76.167.59 acres, or 70.1°^ of the entire area of stats 
forests, are located in the four western counties, and this office is concerned 
with the silvicultural work on these state-owned lands. The small funds 
available restricted the usual work, and allowed for none of the contem- 
plated new developments. A detailed statement of the work accomplished 
on the individual forests in the western part of the state is given in another 
section of the Division of Forestry report under State Forests. 

The purpose for which the condition of forest growth within the stats 
forests is being surveyed and the method of gathering the necessary data 
has been fully described in the Annual Report for 1926. In the past season, 
because of lack of funds, it was possible to maintain a party of two men in 
the field for only two months, during which time data was secured on 6.043.4 
acres located within the Weldell. Erving. and Blandford Forests. Field work 
has now been completed on 39,987.4 acres, including all or parts of the Bland- 
ford. Erving, Mohawk Trail, October Mountain. Otis. Peru. SandisfieJd, 
Savoy, Tolland-Granville, Wendell, and Windsor Forests. Already Mile s* 
colored maps showing conditions on 21.627 acres have been placed on file. 
This year, six new maps, representing 9.145.8 acres, have been added to As 
state forest atlas, making a total of twenty-two maps covering 30.7725 
acres which have been submitted. There remain 9.214.6 acres of completed 
field work on which office work is now in progress. 

It is interesting to note that the superintendent and men in charge of 
state forests have asked for the maps of their respective lands from which 
to locate planting areas and to assist them in other lines of work. The aeos> 
racy of the maps has been tested by Chief Forester H. O. Cook and the mass 
have been successfully used in locating certain species or classes of timber 
in making timber sales. 

It is essential to the proper management and development of the J tits 
forest to have a knowledge of the conditions within the separate arses. 
Since the method of survey devised for gathering and compiling the neces- 
sary data is fast and cheap, it is hoped that more money may be aQottsi 
to this work in the future, and that the surveys may be extended to indsds 
all state forest lands. 

Only 265,000 trees were planted on the state forests in the western 4H 
trict. This is about one-third the amount planted last year and is equisa 
lent to what has been planted annually in the past on the October MoastBSB 

A small amount of thinning was done in some hardwoods on the Oetsssr 
Mountain Forest. The trees cut were made into cordwood which was ssli. 

On the October Mountain Forest about 20.000 feet of oak and ash 
been cut and sold. The cutting and hauling was done by our met h 



P.D. 73 



15 



the supervision of the Forest Superintendemt. Also, an arrangement has 
been made to sell about 3,000 hardwood tie logs. The cutting and hauling 
to the main road is to be done by our men. 

A hardwood tie sale has been made on the Sandisfield Forest, Tiffany- 
Lots. Here the purchaser does the operating and pays in accordance with 
the number of pieces obtained. 

These later sales are important, since the ties are to be cut from inferior 
hardwoods of which many have been damaged by the ice storm of 1921 and 
are now deteriorating quite rapidly. Should these sales prove satisfactory 
to those concerned they will be extended to other areas. For at least five 
or six years this offers an opportunity to salvage a large amount of inferior 
material which is now an encumbrance to young growth. 

Blister Rust Eradication. 

In co-operation with the Blister Rust Agents in Hampden and Franklin 
Counties, who also cover Hampshire County, several reforestation lots have 
been examined, ribes eradicated where necessary, and reported upon. In 
Hampshire County the eradication work on reforestation lots was extended 
to a section of the Conway Forest. Two men from this department were 
assigned to this work for about six weeks. The work on the Conway Forest 
should be continued next year. 

Blister rust was found within the Mohawk Trail and Savoy Forests. 
Further examination should be made of these areas and eradication crews 
should be placed on these forests as soon as funds can be secured. 

Insect Attacks. 

The tamarack in the western part of the state is suffering from an insect 
attack. How serious the results may be cannot be ascertained for some 
time. Tamarack is of little commercial importance owing to its small size, 
its scarcity and its widely scattered distribution. 

The Federal Gypsy Moth Laboratory at Melrose Highlands has definitely 
established sample plots within the Erving Forest to be # used in connection 
with gypsy moth control. 

Land Purchase. 

Several areas of desirable lands for state forest purposes have been offered 
to the state for purchase, but due to present financial circumstances only 
the 2,987.07 acres purchased could be given consideration. 

Mohawk Trail and Jacob's Ladder Investigations. 

In accordance with a request from the Berkshire Conference and the 
Western Massachusetts Chambers of Commerce, made through the Massa- 
chusetts Forestry Association, this department conducted investigations 
to determine the possibilities of purchasing lands bordering the Mohawk 
Trail and a portion of the Jacob's Ladder route. 

On the Mohawk Trail, the purpose of the proposed purchase was the same 
as set forth in the Report Relative to Establishing a State Forest Along 
the Mohawk Trail dated January, 1916, viz.: to protect the natural scenic 
beauty along the Trail by eliminating or controlling the erection of buildings 
and signs which tend to obstruct and deface this unsurpassed beauty. Such 
|an investigation was to start at the present Mohawk Trail Forest and to 
extend westward to include the upper and lower slopes of the Hairpin Turn 
|jin North Adams, or the same sections as covered in the above-mentioned 
-eport of January, 1916. While in 1916 the desired lands could have been 
secured for approximately $75,000, today hardly any of the owners wish to 
-ell unless forced to do so by the state, or they will sell at such excessive 
!>rices as will require an appropriation of nearly $1,000,000. The results of 
: he investigation would tend to show that such a purchase would be entirely 
mpracticable. Some similar investigation was made along the Jacob's 
^adder route from Greenwater Pond to Chester Center with practically the 
i ame results as along the Mohawk Trail. 



16 



P.D. 73 



Other Work. 

An examination of the monthly Extension Forestry reports shows that in 
the western district the number of requests for service and educational work 
along forestry lines has steadily increased over those of previous years. 
Requests for information and service have come from Hampden. Hampshire, 
Franklin, Berkshire, Worcester. Suffolk, and Plymouth Counties. Some of 
the subjects covered include: Co-operative meetings. Boy Scouts, examina- 
tions, exhibits, field trips, planting, talks, town forests, schools, organiza- 
tions, cities and towns, and miscellaneous. 

There have been many calls to attend meetings pertaining to forestry or 
allied subjects. The principal meetings attended during the year were: 
the joint monthly meetings of the forestry committees of the Chamber of 
Commerce and the Hampden County Improvement League at Springfield, as 
a member of both committees ; at the request of the Springfield Chamber of 
Commerce, the annual meeting of the American Forestry Association at 
New Haven, Connecticut, in January, was attended. — (this was probably 
the first time that a forester represented a Chamber of Commerce at such an 
occasion); represented forestry at the annual "Round-up" of Boy Scouts at 
Springfield, in February, at which 1.500 boys took part and 2,000 adults 
were present; attended several meetings of the Hampden County Improve- 
ment League; arranged in co-operation with Mr. S. T. Dana for a meeting 
place at the Hampden County Improvement League Building for the annual 
meeting of the Northeastern Forest Research Council, in February; and 
represented this department at the annual meeting of the Connecticut 
Forestry Association at the Rainbow Plantation, Connecticut, in May, 
and at the New England Conference at Springfield, in November. 

The interest in Forestry continues to grow among the Boy Scout organ- 
izations, and it has been possible to follow the progress while acting as a 
member of the Hampden Council, forestry advisor, merit badge examiner in 
Forestry and Conservation, and as a member of the Camp John Robinson 
committee. The Hampden Council owns two camps: Camp Sherman, at 
Brimfield. consisting of 60 acres, and Camp John Robinson, in Westfield, 
containing 65 acres. There has been a steady improvement in slash disposal 
on these properties. Last spring 2,000 trees were planted, making a total 
of over 10,000 trees planted. All camps will soon be supplied with the mini- 
mum fire equipment as outlined by the Chief Fire Warden of this department. 

At the Boy Scout ''Round-up" during American Forest Week, at which 
1,000 boys and adults were present, a talk was given on forestry and two 
reels of forest movies were shown. 

At the school session of the Boy Scout executives of western Massachusetts 
at Amherst, the entire day was devoted to forestry, including fire protection 
and minimum fire equipment, planting, forestry instruction in camps and 
general forestry. 

In North Adams the Boy Scouts have acquired a camp site. A definite 
plan of development has been instituted, and this spring 2,000 trees were 
planted. 

There has been the usual demand for advice to private owners regarding 
timber, thinnings, woodlot management, and planting. This has been given 
through personal examination of conditions on the ground. The number of 
requests for advice concerning shade trees and ornamental trees has increased. 
It has been possible in conjunction with forestry work to render assistance 
in fruit tree pruning and spraying. The number of examinations made is 
included elsewhere in the report of the Division of Forestry. 

During the year this office was responsible for planning and setting up an 
extensive exhibit in the Division of Forestry wing of the Massachusetts 
Building at the Eastern States Exposition. One side was devoted to nursery 
stock as supplied by this department. Beds of one and two-year seedlings 
and three and four-year transplants were arranged to show the development 
of white pine from the seed until ready for field planting. On this side also 
were short logs of sixteen commercial species of forest trees of Massachusetts. 
In the central space was a relief map of Massachusetts, 10 x 16 feet in size 



P.D. 73 



17 



on which was shown the location of the 42 fire observation towers, 44 state 
forests, and 77 town forests. The wall space was hung with pictures and 
panels loaned by the U. S. Forest Service. The side opposite the nursery 
stock, a space 12 x 32 feet, was given over to the main feature of the exhibit 
consisting of two contrasting miniature scenes: one, showing forest conser- 
vation and the other forest devastation. On the right, the cut-over and 
burned-over mountain slopes with a briskly burning fire claiming the re- 
maining green timber resulted in erosion, a dried-up river and lake, and an 
abandoned district; while on the left, the green forest-covered hills with a 
clear running stream bring industry to the sawmill and railroad and pros- 
perity to the settlement and farming community ; a story told to all and lost 
by few. (Mr. Joshua L. Brooks, President of the Eastern States Exposition, 
stated that this was the second best educational feature ever put on at the 
Eastern States Exposition.) It was estimated that 150,000 people saw this 
exhibit. A small exhibit was put in at the Tri-County Fair in Northampton. 
This consisted of boxes of 1, 2, 3 and 4-year white pine, a scene-in-action fire 
display, and some framed pictures. 

In accordance with your instructions, an exhibit of pictures, maps, and a 
stereomotograph with colored slides secured from Maine, New Hampshire, 
Connecticut and Massachusetts was set up for the New England Council 
meetings at Springfield to represent the work of the New England State 
Foresters. 

Field Trips. 

A field trip to the Rainbow Plantation in Connecticut was arranged for 
the members of the forestry committees of the Chamber of Commerce and 
Hampden County Improvement League. This indicates the interest taken 
in forestry by these men. Two days were spent with Mr. F. W. Besley, 
State Forester of Maryland, inspecting the forestry work of this department 
in the western district. Acting as leader on a forestry field trip with twenty- 
five members of the South Shore Nature Club, a section of country in Scit- 
uate was visited. The work of this department was explained; a demonstra- 
tion of planting was given; and the treatment of cut-over lands, pure pine, 
and hardwoods was explained with examples in the field. The town forest 
was also inspected. A two-day trip to the October Mountain Forest and to 
private lands in Dalton was arranged for Mr. H. F. Matzahn, a German 
forester, visiting this country, who was interested in seeing oak and pine 
timber. 

In this district during the past year, many of the examinations made for 
private individuals pertained to planting. The records show that in the 
four western counties there were eighty-one new purchases of trees, while 
forty-four old purchasers placed orders. In this district there was a total 
of 595,395 trees sold for planting, an increase of 118,295 over the year 1926. 
An additional 184,000 trees were secured from the state and planted by state 
departments on other than state forest lands, on town forests, and by Boy 
Scouts. It is quite probable that the total of trees planted would be aug- 
mented by planting stock purchased by others from private firms of which 
we have no record. While the above numbers represent coniferous species, 
a small planting of 50 Japanese chestnuts has been made in the town of 
Cummington on private land. The trees were secured from the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture. This planting will be watched with considerable 
interest, since the Japanese chestnut may be the one tree to replace our 
native chestnut which has been completely destroyed by the blight. In the 
past ten years many thousands of trees have been planted and it is quite 
probable that some plantations may have suffered through lack of proper 
care. In such cases, this may be due to a lack of knowledge rather than a 
loss of interest on the part of the owners. A "follow .up" system to reach 
the owners of at least the larger plantations is to be inaugurated. 

During the year eleven talks, of which five were illustrated by lantern 
slides, were given to Boy Scouts, service clubs, and women's clubs. The 
largest attendance was at talks given to the Hampden Women's Clubs at 



18 P.D. 73 

Holyoke with 200 women present: the Boy Scout "Round-up" during 
American Forest Week at Springfield before 1,000 boys and adults; and to 
500 women at a meeting of the Hampden Women's Clubs at Springfield. 

This office has continued to render assistance in the town forest move- 
ment. Committee meetings have been attended, examinations made, and 
advice given relative to the development work on the town forest areas. 
While some committees are constantly seeking information, others are 
seemingly carrying on their work without asking for help. At present, plant- 
ing is the principal work being undertaken, and in 1927 this department 
supplied 129,500 trees to Granville, Ludlow. Russell, South Hadley, Conway, 
Warwick. Dalton. North Adams, and Pittsfield for planting on town forest 
lands. In the four western counties there are now twenty-one town forests 
having a total area of 5.627 acres. This is over one-half the acreage con- 
tained in the 77 town forests within the state. 

Through the Nature Study Supervisor, the schools of Springfield, espe- 
cially the Junior High Schools, have taken an active interest in forestry. 
Besides the distribution of Forest Primers issued by the American Tree 
Association, five nursery sites were established in April during American 
Forest Week. About 200 pupils from seven Junior High Schools took part 
in the work. Each pupil actually planted a number of seeds and a number 
of 2. 3, and 4 year trees. A pound of white pine seed and 4,000 trees were 
used. This is to be made an annual event, and eventually the trees from 
these nurseries are to be planted around schools and in the parks by the 
pupils. 

Besides the work with the Chamber of Commerce, Hampden County 
Improvement League, and Boy Scouts, it has been possible to assist the 
directors of the 14th and 15th districts of the Federation of Women's Clubs 
with their District Forest. In the spring, 11,000 trees were planted. As a 
direct result of the forestry work started by the women here, the Federation 
of Women's Clubs in Worcester County is to undertake a forestry project 
as an objective. 

It is natural that some co-operative work should have been done with the 
forester of the Park Department of Springfield. Plantations have been ex- 
amined : assistance has been given in securing nursery stock for field plant- 
ing and in selecting both wild and nursery stock for street and ornamental 
planting; shade trees have been examined; assistance rendered in moving 
large trees; and advice given in the development of the new Stanhope E. 
Blunt Park. 

In Palmer a group of street trees was examined, and a proper treatment 
was suggested. Recommendations were also made for the development of 
a park for an American Legion memorial. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. C. A. Galarxeau, 
Forester in Western Massachusetts. 

Report of the State Fire Warden. 
Mr. William A. L. Bazeley, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with the provisions of section 26, chapter 48 of the 
General Laws. I submit herewith a report of the work accomplished by this 
branch of the division during the year just ended. 

The spring of 1927 will doubtlessly be remembered by many, especially 
by those in the fire service, as one of the worst spring fire seasons Massachu- 
setts has experienced in many years: in fact, records show that it was one 
of the most protracted and serious spring droughts experienced in fifty years. 
Although the drought started March 21, when there was a rainfall of one- 
half inch, the dry weather really extended much further back, as the precipi- 
tation for the entire month was only 1.19 inches, or nearly three inches below 
normal for the month. From March 21 to April 22 there was practically no 
rainfall. This, together with the high winds and low humidity, made fire 



P. D. 73 



19 



conditions very serious. One of the important factors in the control of 
forest fires is the humidity. Normal humidity in Massachusetts is around 
70%, and when this drops to below 45%, we must look for bad forest fire 
weather. During the last thirty years the lowest humidity recorded during 
the month of April was 23% in 1925 and 24% in 1926. Compared with 
these figures we find that during the period from April 11 to 16 inclusive the 
average percentage of humidity was less than 18%, and that on April 12 it 
reached 10%, the lowest reading ever recorded in the State. To the ordinary 
observer there may not seem to be a very close relationship between a low 
percentage of humidity and the spread of fires, but in reality the lack of 
moisture in the atmosphere has a great deal to do with the control of fires. 

During the period from April 10 to 22, inclusive, the observation towers 
reported 1,251 fires, or an average of over 100 fires daily. Of this number 
over 95% were extinguished with very little area burned and only slight 
damage. 

It was no easy task for our field force and their helpers to meet a situation 
of this kind. It was necessary for them to be in the field fighting fires con- 
tinually during the drought. While town forest wardens in nearly all cases 
did exceptionally fine work, when fires assumed such proportions that they 
were unable to cope with them, our men were called on to assist. This, of 
course, placed them at a distinct disadvantage as the fires had reached such 
proportions then that the work of extinguishing them was extremely difficult. 
This made it necessary that such fires had to be fought in the late afternoon 
and night during this entire period and the men could only get such rest 
and sleep as it was possible to get from four to ten a. m., many times sleeping 
in an automobile or an old building. 

As no provision was made in our budget for an emergency of this kind, 
the General Court made an additional appropriation of $5,000 to meet the 
increased cost of labor and equipment during this period. 

Our power pumps certainly proved their value and many thousands of 
dollars' worth of valuable forest lands and buildings were saved by their 
use. These pumps can be set up on any small stream and will supply a good 
stream of water through a mile of hose if necessary. Several towns through- 
out eastern Massachusetts have already purchased power pumps and I feel 
quite confident that this coming spring we will find many additional towns 
providing themselves with such pumps and suitable trucks for the transpor- 
tation of them and also men to the fires. 

We received the best of co-operation from the State Police during this 
drought. They practically discontinued all other work and devoted their 
entire time to rendering us very valuable assistance in the prevention and 
extinguishment of fires. Our reports show that they extinguished many 
fires themselves as well as assisting in the extinguishment of many of our 
large fires. 

Conditions were so serious during this period that on April 14 it became 
necessary for the Governor to close all woodlands to the public and suspend 
the opening of the fishing season. The following proclamation was issued: 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
By His Excellency Alvan T. Fuller, Governor. 

A PROCLAMATION 

Because of the long continued dry period, which has greatly increased 
the fire hazards to the forests and woodlands of Massachusetts, and because 
of the fact that the record of forest fires for this spring indicated that we 
have had over 900 fires with 22,000 acres burned over at a loss of $85,000 
in damage, and that at the present time there are reported on an average 
of a hundred fires daily; and furthermore, because there is every indication 
that this dry period will continue with high winds; I hereby proclaim that, 
under chapter 249 of the Acts of 1925, any open season on fish, established 



20 



P.D. 73 



by chapters 130 and 131 of the General Laws of Massachusetts, shall be 
suspended through the continuance of the present menace to the woodlands 
of this Commonwealth by fire and until a proclamation shall be made for 
the purpose of reopening the fishing season. 

I hereby further proclaim that, commencing at sunset today during the 
continuance of the present menace to the woodlands of this Commonwealth 
by fire and until proclamation shall be made for the purpose of reopening the 
fishing seasons, all sections of the woodlands in the Commonwealth shall 
be closed to fishermen and all other persons, except the owners or tenants 
of such woodlands and their agents and employees, or persons holding writ- 
ten permission from any such owner or tenant to enter thereon for any 
lawful purpose other than fishing. 

Given at the Executive Chamber in Boston, this fourteenth day of April 
in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty-seven, and 
of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and 
fifty-first. 

ALVAN T. FULLER. 

By His Excellency the Governor. 

Frederic W. Cook, 
Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

Under date of April 23 the woodlands were reopened and the following 

proclamation issued: 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
By His Excellency Alvan T. Fuller, Governor. 

A PROCLAMATION 

Whereas, as provided by law, it became my duty as Governor to suspend 
the fishing season and to close the woodlands to all persons: and whereas, 
the Commissioner of Conservation now advises me that sufficient rain has 
fallen to remove the danger of forest fires, it therefore equally becomes my 
duty to proclaim hereby that the open season on fishing is again in force 
and that the woods are opened as of April 23, 1927. 

In proclaiming again the open season, it is a great satisfaction to make 
record of the splendid spirit with which the people of our Commonwealth 
responded to the requirements of the critical situation through which we 
have just passed, caused by the fire menace in our woodland areas. 

The open season on trout is hereby extended from July 31, 1927, to August 
8, 1927. 

Given at the Executive Chamber in Boston, this twenty-third day of 
April, in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty-seven, 
and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred 

and fiftv-first. 

ALVAN T. FULLER. 

By His Excellency the Governor. 

Frederic W. Cook, 
Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

There has always been a doubt in the minds of many people whether the 
closing of the woods to the public would actually reduce the number of 
fires. The closing of the woods at this time has given us an exceptionally 
good opportunity to determine the actual results and our records show that 
the number of fires were reduced 36^. 

The two forestry organizations in Plymouth and Barnstable counties 
have been very active during the year. These organizations are made up 
of forest wardens and deputies, selectmen and men interested in the pres- 
ervation of our forests and each organization has over 150 members. The 



P.D. 73 



21 



co-operative work carried on by them in the prevention and extinguishment 
of fires is very creditable. Two new organizations have been started during 
the year, one in eastern Barnstable county and one in southern Norfolk 
county. These two organizations are comparatively new and will probably 
become very active by the time our next spring season for fires is here. 

The annual outdoor meeting of our entire field force, made up of about 
fifty men, was held at Plymouth on October 26 and 27. Inspection trips 
were made to the Myles Standish and Shawme Forests, with an evening 
meeting at Plymouth, when various topics relative to the work were dis- 
cussed. These meetings have proved very instructive, giving the men from 
various parts of the State an opportunity to study and comment on the 
work carried on within the different State Forests. 

A large amount of field work has been accomplished by the men who come 
under my supervision. Mr. John P. Crowe, Supervising Fire Warden for 
central and eastern Massachusetts, with four assistants and Mr. Albert R. 
Ordway, District Forest Warden in charge of this work in western Massa- 
chusetts, with tevo assistants, have had an exceptionally busy season. 

In the construction of the telephone lines leading to our various towers, it 
is necessary, of course, to run them through many miles of forested area, 
thereby making it necessary to repair and reconstruct many of these lines 
from time to time. This season extensive repairs have been made on these 
lines covering about forty-five miles. In addition to this, sixteen miles 
have been entirely rebuilt and in many instances it has been necessary to 
replace the old tree lines with pole lines. 

Fourteen towers have been repainted and the buildings at the top have 
been painted and refinished inside. Old buildings on the State Forests have 
either been taken down or put in condition for use and new buildings have 
been constructed. 

Over 500 wooden signs for use on the forests have been made and a number 
of the present large signs have been repainted and lettered. 

A new 68-foot steel tower was erected in the town of Wellfleet which gives 
protection to a large area of forest lands on the lower Cape. This tower 
will complete our observation system on Cape Cod and should prove a very 
valuable asset. 

An effort has been made in the purchase of our forests to distribute them 
throughout the State. By so doing each district forest warden has one or 
more sizable State Forests in his district and the maintenance of the build- 
ings, roads, equipment and forest fire protection are under his general super- 
vision. This policy has worked out to the advantage of this department. 

The Cape Cod Forest Fire Prevention Experiment, which was very suc- 
cessful last year, has demonstrated again this year the value of education and 
patrol in holding the fire losses down to a minimum. This experiment is 
carried on through the joint efforts of the United States Forest Service, the 
Massachusetts Forestry Association and the Department of Conservation. 
It has a three-year program planned, this year completing the second year. 
It is confined to the towns of Bourne, Barnstable, Falmouth, Mashpee, 
Sandwich and Yarmouth, and in this work we have the hearty co-operation 
of the forest wardens, selectmen and residents of these towns. We have 
had two forest rangers patrolling the roads in these towns during the entire 
summer. These rangers were equipped with automobile trucks and forest 
fire fighting equipment and traveled over 29,000 miles, interviewing 10,540 
persons and personally attending 38 fires. The expense of this patrol was 
$2,916.23 and was made possible by an appropriation of $3,000 contributed 
equally by the U. S. Forest Service and the Department of Conservation. 
There were 90 fires, which burned over an area ef 1,082 acres, and causing 
a damage of $6,527.75, with an expense of $2,541.38. Our records show that 
the number of fires have not been materially reduced in this area, which is 
partially due to the fact that more complete reports of all fires have been 
submitted to this office during this experiment than ever before. Our rec- 
ords also show that notwithstanding the fact that the past two years have 
been exceptionally bad fire seasons on the Cape, we have expended 7% less 



22 



P.D. 73 



money in the total cost of education, patrol and suppression than was ex- 
pended during a like period before the experiment was started for extinguish- 
ment alone, and the loss in acreage burned over has been reduced 74%. 
The results of this experiment have been so encouraging that the Cape Cod 
Chamber of Commerce and the Massachusetts Forestry Association ap- 
pointed a Joint Committee to study the problem of reforestation on the 
Cape. The Committee was made up of business men and expert foresters, 
and after making a thorough study of conditions, they submitted a very 
extensive ten-year reforestation program which applies to the entire Cape. 
I look forward to the adoption of this program by practically every town at 
their coming spring town meetings. 

During the months of January and February we held several forest fire 
meetings throughout the State, taking in our town forest wardens and some 
selectmen. These meetings were well attended and proved very interesting 
and instructive. 

Through the efforts of the U. S. Weather Bureau and the U. S. Forest 
Service a member of the service conferred with us in regard toigiving us better 
co-operation in weather forecasting. As a result of this, four weather sta- 
tions were established in different parts of the State, and using reports from 
these, the service at the Post Office building was able to issue to us forecasts 
of the weather of great value. The reports included wind velocity and 
humidity, knowledge of which is most valuable in seasons of great fire risks. 
Over the radio, such reports and also reports on proper weather for issuing 
fire permits, were most valuable. We wish to acknowledge our debt to 
this service for its helpfulness and co-operation. 

Our co-operative work with the United States Forest Service under the 
Clarke-McXary Act has been very satisfactory. Mr. C. R. Tillotson, in 
charge of the Federal work in this section, has been very courteous and 
obliging. He is very much interested in the work and has given some very 
instructive talks at the various meetings and he attended many of our 
serious fires and received some first-hand information on our method of 
fighting them. 

The following tables show the comparative damages, costs, etc., for the 
past three years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden. 



Forest Fires for the Past three Years. 



Year 
1925 
1926 
1927 



Number 
of fires 
. 3,310 
. 2,860 
. 2,029 



Acreage 
burned 
43,876 
34,675 
35,400 



Cost to 
extinguish 
$66,855.00 
61,030.00 
61,362.00 



Damage 
$194,741.00 
163,668.00 
286,673.00 



Average Average 
acreage damage 



per fire 
13.25 
12.12 
17.45 



per fire 
58.83 
57.22 
141.28 



Types of Classified Damages. 

1926 



Standing trees 

Logs, lumber, cordwood 

Buildings 

Bridges, fences 

Sproutland 

Miscellaneous . 



$83,998.00 
25,027.00 
35,981.00 
1,427.00 
16,550.00 
685.00 



1927 
$183,203.00 
34,897.00 
52,427.00 
1,114.00 
15,032.00 



Total 



$163,668.00 



$286,673.00 



P.D. 73 



Timber 

Second growth 
Second growth, 
Brush land . 
Grass land . 

Total . 



Types of Land Burned Over 



not merchantable 



(Acres). 

1926 
1,153 
5,528 
7,223 
16,550 
4,221 



34,675 



23 



1927 
3,818 
6,325 
6,207 
15,032 
4,018 

35,400 



Forest Fires of 1927. 



Months 

1926 
December 

1927 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May . 
June . 
July • 
August 
September 
October 
November 

Total 







Cost to 




Number 


Acres 


Extinguish 


Damage 


3 


•27 


$40.00 


$10.00 


3 


2 


15.00 




32 


43 


138.00 


40.00 


516 


3,178 


5,667.00 


17,631.00 


1,194 


29,995 


48,904.00 


259,972.00 


193 


1,848 


5,281.00 


7,035.00 


41 


183 


791.00 


1,520.00 


13 


44 


247.00 


386.00 


6 


15 


33.00 




14 


40 


144.00 


27.00 


14 


25 


102.00 


52.00 


2,029 


35,400 


$61,362.00 


$286,673.00 



Classified Causes of Forest Fires, 1926-1927. 





1926 


1927 


Number Per Cent 


Number Per Cent 


Railroad .... 

Lumbering .... 

Brush burning 

Campers . 

Incendiary .... 

Unknown . . . . 

Miscellaneous 

Total . 


625 21.85 
2 .07 
481 16.82 
10 .35 
107 3.74 
633 22.13 
1,002 35.04 


450 22.18 

3 .15 
315 15.53 

4 .20 
149 7.34 
462 22.77 
646 31.83 


2,860 100.00 


2,029 100.00 



Railroad Fires of 1927. 



Railroad 

New York, New Haven 

& Hartford . 
Boston & Albany 
Boston & Maine 
entral Vermont 

Total . 



Number Number 



Mileage 


of loco- 


of 


Acreage 


Cost to 


of track 


motives 


fires 


burned 


extinguish 


1,931 


1,007 


322 


3,330 


$5,178.00 


969 


331 


53 


922 


1,184.00 


1,917 


934 


65 


7,563 


7,270.00 


73 


23 


10 


65 


310.00 


4,890 


2,295 


450 


11,880 


$13,942.00 



Damage 

$14,365.00 
8,883.00 
123,932.00 
18.00 

$147,198.00 



24 



P.D. 73 

Report of the Superintendent of Moth Work. 



Hon. Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner. 

Sir: — In my last year's report I called to your attention the steady in- 
crease in the numbers of the gypsy moth throughout the eastern and central 
parts of Massachusetts and the region of Cape Cod. There was a great 
increase in the number of egg clusters noted, and in spite of careful creo- 
soting in many towns there were still many areas where we were unable to 
do this, owing to insufficient funds, and therefore an unusually large number 
of caterpillars were hatched and much woodland was stripped in the summer 
season. Because of the reduced appropriations made by the State, we were 
unable to render the assistance to the towns which we have made in former 
years, and I am convinced that many towns by their inactivity, and in some 
cases apparent indifference, have failed completely to realize the very grave 
danger which threatens them at the present time. 

I sincerely hope that the object lesson given this year by the acres of 
stripped woodland in the State will stimulate the apathetic towns to appro- 
priate this spring the full amount which the law can require them to expend, 
and that this money will be available for early operations. During my 
twenty-five years of connection with the gypsy moth work I do not recall a 
time when conditions seemed to me as critical as at the present time. 

The total number of acres reported stripped in the State is 133,000. The 
towns where stripping occurred are as follows: 



Acton 


Groton 


Norwell 


Acushnet 


Groveland 


Orleans 


Attleboro 


Halifax 


Pembroke 


Ayer 


Hanover 


Pepperell 


Barnstable 


Harvard 


Plymouth 


Berkley 


Harwich 


Ply mp ton 


Berlin 


Haverhill 


Princeton 


Billerica 


Hingham 


Randolph 


Bolton 


Holbrook 


Rehoboth 


Bourne 


Holden 


Rochester 


Boxborough 


Holliston 


Rockland 


B oxford 


Hopkinton 


Rowley 


Boylston 


Ipswich 


Rultand 


Braintree 


Kingston 


Sandwich 


Brewster 


Lakeville 


Saugus 


Bridgewater 


Lancaster 


Seekonk 


Burlington 


Lincoln 


Sharon 


Canton 


Lunenburg 


Sherborn 


Carlisle 


Lynn 


Shirley 


Carver 


Lynnfield 


Southborough 


Chatham 


Mansfield 


Stoughton 


Concord 


Marlborough 


Stowe 


Dan vers 


Marshfield 


Sudbury 


Dartmouth 


Mashpee 


Taunton 


Dennis 


Mattapoisett 


Topsfield 


Dighton 


Maynard 


Townsend 


Dover 


Medfield 


Tyngsborough 


Dunstable 


Merrimac 


Upton 


Duxbury 


Middleborough 


Walpole 


East Bridgewater 


Middleton 


Wareham 


Eastham 


Milford 


Wenham 


Easton 


Milton 


West Newbury 


Fairhaven 


Newbury 


Westborough 


Fall River 


Newburyport 


Westford 


Falmouth 


Norfolk 


Westport 


Franklin 


North Andover 


Westwood 


Freetown 


North Attleborough 


Wrentham 


Georgetown 


Northborough 


Yarmouth 


Grafton 


Norton 





P.D. 73 



25 



The brown-tail moth situation, while not alarming, has been sufficiently 
grave to cause considerable activity. In spots where thorough, careful 
work was not done, a marked increase was seen; but if these localities are 
carefully treated, no danger from this insect need be anticipated. 

The co-operative work on the North Shore was carried on until the bal- 
ance in the fund which remained on December 1, 1926, was expended. On 
account of the small State appropriation for 1927 we could not continue 
our donation to this work, but Col. Wm. D. Sohier, Agent for the summer 
residents, the town of Manchester, and the city of Beverly continued this 
work, this office acting in a supervisory capacity and dispensing the fund. 

A financial statement is here given of our transactions in this fund : — 

Financial Statement. 
November 30, 1927. 
North Shore Gypsy Moth Suppression. 



Receip ts 

Balance from 1926 ....... $1,782.05 

Nov. 20 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent .... 175.49 

July 30 Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Forester . . . 206.17 

$2,163.71 

Expenditures. 

Salaries $1,583.89 

Travel 8.44 

Telephone 17.50 

Freight and teaming (Gasoline, etc.) . . . 118.62 

Supplies (hose, gas and tools) 190.19 

Rent of storehouse 245.00 

2,163.64 



Balance not used $ .07 



Special Fund Deposited by Col. Wm. D. Sohier, Agent. 

jq27 Receipts. 

May 6 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent $500.00 

June 3 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 500.00 

June 8 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 1,000.00 

June 14 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent (Beverly and Manchester) . 2,000.00 

June 15 Supt. of Buildings 10.90 

October Interest on deposit 14.83 



v $4,025.73 
Expenditures. 

Services $2,125.48 

Travel 24.86 

Telephone 17.64 

Rent 140.00 

Supplies (gasoline, etc.) 57.25 

Teaming 30.83 

2,396.06 



Balance carried to 1928 $1,629.67 



The report of the United States Department of Agriculture, in charge of 
the parasite work, follows. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Smith, Superintendent of Moth Work. 



26 



P.D. 73 



Federal Gypsy Moth Work in Massachusetts. 

By A. F. Burgess. 

During the past year intensive scouting and clean-up work has been con- 
tinued by the Federal Government in Berkshire County, which embraces 
that portion of the barrier zone which lies in the State of Massachusetts. 
The number of infestations have been reduced during the year and the 
territory is in better condition than at any time since the barrier zone was 
established. 

The work of introducing and disseminating parasites and natural enemies 
has been continued throughout the year, the foreign station of the Bureau 
of Entomology located at Budapest, Hungary, having shipped large consign- 
ments of parasites to be liberated in this country. The continuance of 
intensive work of this kind appeared very urgent on account of the fact that 
during the past few years the actual percentage of field parasitism of the 
gypsy moth has been very low and this has been accompanied by a rapid 
increase in the abundance of the insect and the reappearance of large de- 
foliated areas in the eastern part of the State. 

In 1925 and 1926 the greater part of this defoliation was confined to the 
Cape Cod section of the State, although in the latter year more than a 
hundred acres were defoliated in each of 24 towns southeast of Boston and 
west of the Cape Cod Canal. In several of these towns more than a thou- 
sand acres were involved. Small defoliated areas also occurred in a number 
of towns north and west of Boston and isolated areas in Greenfield and 
Deerfield in the Connecticut Valley were reported. In 1927 the area defo- 
liated nearly doubled, aggregating more than 130,000 acres. This was 
accompanied by a general increase in the insect over most of the territory 
in the State, although it was not sufficiently abundant in many towns to 
cause actual defoliation. In the territory between the Connecticut River 
and the Berkshire County line the increase amounted to approximately 
215% above that of the previous year, and as the past season indicates that 
the percentage of parasitism is still low, conditions are favorable for further 
increase and greater defoliation by this pest. 

In the summer of 1927 the Bureau of Entomology was able to do a small 
amount of spraying in some of the worst infested places west of the Con- 
necticut River and assisted the State and the towns by doing this work so 
far as available funds would permit. The maintenance of the barrier zone 
is threatened whenever heavy infestations exist in the territory directly 
adjoining it to the eastward and unless more intensive work is done between 
the Connecticut River and Berkshire County, the latter County will become 
reinfested. During the fall of 1927 a limited amount of scouting work has 
been done by the Federal force in this territory east of the zone and a greater 
infestation has been found than during the previous year. 

Conditions are serious in this section and if more scouting and treatment 
work is not done the insect will increase and the opportunity for curtailing 
its spread will be greatly reduced. 

The increase of the different species of parasites in the field is effected by 
so many different factors that it is impossible to determine whether or how 
soon temporary relief from heavy defoliation will result. If control by nat- 
ural enemies does not develop very rapidly so that the present high rate of 
increase by the gypsy moth is Curtailed, the acreage of heavy defoliation by 
this insect will increase unless more intensive field control measures are 
employed. 

At the present time the gypsy moth situation in Massachusetts is more 
serious and threatening than it has been at any time for a considerable 
period of years. 



P.D. 73 27 

APPENDIX. 

Financial Statement. 



Receipts and Expenditures for Year ending November 30, 1927. 







Refunds, 








x urpose oi Appropriation 


Amount 


Balances 


Expendi- 


Balance to 


Balance to 


and 


tures 


1928 


Treasury 






Transfers 






Salary of Commissioner .... 


$6,000 


— 


$6,000 00 


— 


— 


Personal Services 


11,600 


— 


11,530 00 


- 


$70 00 


Expenses of Commissioner 


250 


— 


154 45 


— 


95 55 


Office Incidentals 


4,000 


$11 25 


3,238 46 




772 79 


General Forestry and Nurseries . 


12,000 


' 20 32 


12,018 63 




1 69 


Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands . 


7,000 


7 50 


7,007 03 


— 


47 


Prevention of Forest Fires .... 


64,955 


2 20 


64,956 95 


— 


25 


Federal Forestry Fund .... 


— 


18,540 26 


17,940 43 


$599 83 




Protection against Forest Fires . 


2,000 


- 


1,744 48 


- 


255 52 


Reimbursement for Fighting Fires . 


1,500 




500 00 




1,000 00 


Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-tail 












50,000 


5,500 66 


55,498 82 


1 84 




Maintenance of State Forests . 


25,000 


1 00 


25,000 01 




99 


T^i i roVi Ajap nnrJ T^Av^lr^nmPiTt" nf Staff* TTr\i"— 








ests 


90,000 


14,663 56 


104,661 97 


1 59 




Maintenance of Mount Grace . 


500 




499 29 




71 


Maintenance of Standish Monument 


2,000 


41 50 


1,887 88 




153 62 


Repair of Standish Monument . 




3,811 09 


1.593 75 


2,217 34 




Prevention of Forest Fires in Barnstable 










1,500 




1,498 93 




1 07 


Construction of Road to Standish Monu- 
















850 95 




349 05 


Legislative Investigation, Prevention of 
Forest Fires in Barnstable County 














16 93 


8 96 




7 97 


Totals 


$279,505 


$42,616 27 


$316,590 99 


$2,820 60 


$2,709 68 



Receipts, 1927 

For ferns sold $500.00 

44 cordwood 1,591.10 

4 4 hay, etc 260.80 

44 blueberries 125.00 

44 lumber, poles, etc 2,741.82 

44 press brush, Christmas trees, etc 787.14 

44 rent and camp sites 1,278.00 

44 sale of buildings, wagons, etc 202.00 

44 miscellaneous 50.00 

44 receipts at Standish monument 727.70 

44 books, maps, etc 36.15 

44 redemption of lots 2,722.79 

44 examinations 119.00 

44 trees sold 15,680.84 

44 highway work (use of sprayers) v 660.00 

44 supplies for gypsy moth work 2,309.06 

44 contributions to fire towers 150.00 

44 supplies for fire fighting 2,632.99 

44 interest on bank deposit 98.78 



Total $32,673.17 



28 



P.D. 73 



Statement of Expenditures and Receipts on State Forests for the 
Year ending November 30, 1927. 



oia ie r ores i 


x lanting 
and 


General Up- 
keep, Fire 
Lines and 


Surveying 
Titles 


T J 

Land 


Totals 


Receipts 




Nurseries 


Roads 
















Arthur Warton Swann 


$221 27 


$1,208 


97 






— 


$1,430 


24 


$75 


00 


Ashburnham 


- 


768 


76 






- 


768 


76 


88 


30 


Barre 


181 48 


438 


03 


$60 


04 


$532 00 


1,211 


55 


76 


03 


Bash Bish .... 


— 










— 










Beartown .... 


108 75 


37 


00 






— 


145 


75 


108 


00 


Blandford .... 


— 


69 


48 


253 


51 


1,576 50 


1 899 


49 






Brimfield .... 








460 


94 


1,627 90 


2088 


84 






Clarksburg .... 












— 






30 


00 


Colrain 


— 


113 


03 


588 


70 


— 


701 


73 






Conway .... 


— 


89 


06 


2 


75 


839 41 


931 


22 






Erving 


1,478 08 


2,901 


31 


45 


20 


— 


4,424 


59 


127 


00 


Foxborough .... 


10 00 


1,480 


35 


93 


42 


2,231 63 


3^805 


40 






Harold Parker 


56 00 


3,220 


54 






— 


3^276 


54 


286 


75 


Hawley .... 


— 


37 


50 


242 


78 


3,040 00 


3^320 


28 


430 


00 


Hubbardston 


— 


34 


26 


207 


12 


— 


241 


38 






Leominster .... 


— 


735 


62 


18 


74 


300 50 


1 054 


86 






Marthas Vineyard 


2,043 07 


5,757 


78 


44 


70 


502 60 


8^348 


15 






Mohawk Trail 


328 99 


1,919 


62 


552 


10 


1,600 00 


4^400 


71 


903 


15 


Monroe .... 


56 66 






269 


53 


430 00 


756 


19 


332 


83 


Mount Grace 


— 


603 


97 






— 


603 


97 


814 


05 


Myles Stand ish . 


2,700 45 


6,462 


31 


30 


00 


— 


9,192 


76 


1,040 


50 


North field .... 


— 










— 










Oakham .... 


— 


604 


39 






— 


604 


39 


7 


00 


October Mountain 


742 75 


8,907 


95 


35 


70 


* '*" -i 


9,686 


40 


1,154 


50 


Otis 


— 






109 


80 


— 


109 


80 






Otter River .... 


4,282 25 


1,574 


00 


20 


00 


— 


5,876 


25 


45 


80 


Oxford 












— 










Peru 








3 


15 


— 


3 


15 




Petersham .... 


— 










— 










Pittsfield .... 






141 


42 


556 50 


697 


92 


125 


00 


Sandisfield .... 


— 


16 


66 


1 


00 


1,060 00 


1,077 


66 


115 


00 


Savoy Mountain 


839 15 


1,223 


20 


14 


07 


2,525 00 


4,601 


42 


1,237 


75 


Shawme .... 


1,453 50 


5,063 


33 


4 


59 


163 34 


6,684 


76 


23 


25 


Shutesbury .... 


— 






1 


40 


— 


1 


40 






Spencer .... 


99 25 


419 


90 


1 


14 


127 00 


647 


29 


144 


86 


Sutton ..... 








13 


31 


141 05 


154 


36 






Templeton .... 






















Tolland-Granville 


140 00 


2,614 


64 


776 


16 


636 50 


4,167 


30 


125 


00 


Warwick .... 




219 


95 








219 


95 


15 


00 


Wendell .... 




137 


46 


175 


31 


1,938 00 


2,250 


77 


5 


00 


Westminster. 








174 


00 




174 


00 






Windsor .... 




146 


82 


82 


40 




229 


22 


206 


09 


Worthington 






















Totals .... 


$14,741 65 


$46,805 


89 


$4,422 


98 


$19,827 93 


$85,798 


45 


$7,515 


86 



The Distribution of Supplies. 

Supplies have been furnished to towns and cities for gypsy moth work 
as far as our limited appropriation warranted. 

The amounts given below do not correspond with the amount of aid given 
to the municipalities, as some towns make payment to the state for all or a 
part of the bill for supplies, according to the amount of their net expendi- 
tures and their class, under the provisions of section 4, chapter 132 of the 
General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement, and for expendi- 
tures, see table on page 29. 



List of Towns and Amounts of Supplies Furnished for 1927. 



Ashby 

Berkley 

Berlin 

Bolton 

Boxborough 

Boxford . 

Boylston . 



$488.22 
317.78 
376.14 
561.21 
576.11 
16.71 
307.09 



Brewster . 

Carlisle 

Dennis 

Dunstable 

Eastham . 

Freetown . 

Georgetown 



P.D. 73 



Halifax 


658.92 


Raynham . 


TTfl.rmnn 


78.35 


T?,owl pv 


Harwich 


! 792!61 


Sandwich . 


TCine r ston 


362.62 


Stow 


Lakeville . 


521.28 


Truro . 


TjiinfiTi bure^ 

JJUilVilMUXg • « 


426.05 


T vti P'shoron e'h 


Mashpee 


694.63 


Wellfleet 


Norwfill 


475.64 


W T,ride r fiwatftr 


Pembroke 


! 692.72 


W. Newbury . 


Pepperell . 


11.52 


Wilmington 


Plainville . 


216.20 


Yarmouth 


Plympton 


337.51 





29 

280.40 
487.68 
522.89 
744.52 
124.95 
300.72 
204.37 
504.28 
268.58 
.59 
31.19 



$13,600.70 



Purchases for other than town supplies made through storehouse : 

Purchase and Development of State Forests $537.19 

Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands 77.31 

General Forestry and Nurseries 158.62 

Maintenance of State Forests 199.05 

Prevention of Forest Fires 875.54 

Special North Shore Work 96.82 

Automobile repairs, etc. (Gypsy Moth) 754.09 

Total ....... $2,698.62 

Table showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and 
Cities for the Year 1927. 





1927 


1928 


Cities and Towns 


Required 


Total Net 








Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 


Required 




Expendi- 
ture 


Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


received 
from 


Expendi- 
tures 


















State 




Abington 


$2,681 


55 














$2,681 55 


Acton 


1,269 


39 














1,269 39 


Acushnet 


1,849 


38 














1,849 38 


Adams 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Agawam 
Alford 


3,421 


15 














3,421 15 


138 


59 














138 59 


Amesbury 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Amherst . 


4,262 


74 














4,262 74 


Andover . 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Arlington 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Ashburnham . 


842 


92 






\ 
J 








842 92 


Ashby 


556 


30 


$557 72 


/ $71 75 
\ *114 17 




$488 22 


$488 22 


556 30 


Aahfield . 


583 


00 












583 00 


Ashland . 


1,274 


59 














1,274 59 


Athol 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Attleboro 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Auburn . 


1,942 


35 














1,942 35 


Avon 


1,039 


48 














1,039 48 


Ayer 


1,570 


76 














1,570 76 


Barnstable 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Barre 


2,438 


27 














2,438 27 


Becket 


448 


73 














448 73 


Bedford . 


1,249 


82 














1,249 82 


Belchertown . 


884 


87 














884 87 


Bellingham 


1,065 


49 














1,065 49 


Belmont . 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Berkley . 


397 


43 


985 84 


129 50 




487 05 


317 78 


804 83 


397 43 


Berlin . 


431 


37 


431 37 


/ 40 75 
\ *49 30 


} 




376 14 


376 14 


431 37 


Bernardston . 


405 


66 














405 66 


Beverly . 


5,000 


00 














5,000 00 


Billerica . 


4,083 


21 














4,083 21 


Blackstone 


1,270 


90 














1,270 90 


Blandford 


520 


09 














520 09 



* Lead sold 



30 



P.D. 73 





1927 


' 1928 


Cities and Towns 


Required 


Total Net 






Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 


Required 




Expendi- 
ture 


Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


received 


Expendi- 
tures 
















State 




Bolton 


$418 


54 


$418 38 


1 3FI oU 

\ *330 00 


} - 


$561 21 


$561 05 


$418 54 


Boston . . 


5,000 


00 


- 






- 


- 


5,000 00 


Bourne . 


3,900 


66 












o.yuu 00 


Boxborough . 


145 


00 


145 13 


*356 70 




576 11 


576 11 


145 00 


Boxford . 


458 


91 


1 054 34 


274 38 




16 71 


601 17 


458 91 


Boylston 


341 


05 


556 38 


/ 212 88 
\ *36 16 


} 194 00 

) 


307 09 


501 09 


341 05 


Tiro i rtfrpp 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Brewster 


655 


35 


906 81 


f 872 25 
| *81 60 


\ 250 00 


629 60 


879 60 


655 35 


JL>I lU^CWdlCl • • 


3,186 


79 












3,186 79 


Ttri m fiplH 

JJIIUIIICIU • • 


606 


48 












606 48 


Brockton 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Brookfield 


693 


70 












693 70 


"Rfr»r*k li tip 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 




1,333 


28 












1,333 28 


Tt 1 1 r 1 i n a t r\ n 

JJ ui xiug ton • • 


754 


54 












754 54 


fi m "Ki*i rl dtp 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


^yalltUll • • • 


3,941 


46 












3,941 46 


{""'a T*l 1 Q 1 P 

v^al HolC » • • 


270 


00 


8=i3 so 




583 80 


124 54 


708 34 


270 00 




1,291 


63. 












1,291 63 


V^IIdl UTIIUJH V • . 


476 


76 












476 76 


Charlton 


1,012 


88 












1,012 88 


Ch atham 


1,865 


34 












1,865 34 


C^.Yi pi m sf nrfi 


4,394 


04 






_ 






4,394 04 


Chelsea 


5,000 


00 




_ 


_ 






5,000 00 


Cheshire 


677 


02 












677 02 


Chester ■ . 


695 


59 












695 59 


Chesterfield 


231 


79 












231 79 


Chicopee • • 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


V_y LHHilC*! IV a • 


210 


37 












210 37 


Clarksburg . . 


08/ 


AA 












587 44 


Clinton 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Cohasset 


3,835 


91 












3,835 91 


Colrain 


999 


85 












999 85 


Concord . • ■ 


3,783 


74 












3,783 74 




448 


08 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




448 08 


Cummington • . 


243 


34 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


243 34 


.L/tilLLHl • • • 


3 387 


57 












3,387 57 


Dana 


361 


68 












361 68 


Danvers . 


5,000 


00 






_ 




_ 


5,000 00 


Dartmouth 


4,856 


57 






_ 




_ 


A fi«ifl <V7 
l ±,ODO Ot 


Dedham 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Deerfield 


2,267 


38 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,267 38 


Dennis . 


890 


44 


1,179 61 


f 331 72 


1 250 00 
J 


495 14 


745 14 


890 44 


Dighton „ 


1,959 


46 












1,959 46 


Douglas . 


997 


02 












997 02 


Dover 


1,491 


97 










_ 


1 491 97 


T^ra out 


2,427 


04 












2^27 04 


Dudley . , 


2,827 


39 












2,827 39 


Dunstable 


279 


94 


568 74 


( 161 84 
( *24 70 


268 31 

i 


16 05 


284 36 


279 94 


j-^uxDury • , 


2,202 


50 












2,202 50 


Fjwf TlriHtrAwfitpr 


2,227 


03 




_ 




_ 


_ 


2,227 03 


Ea<*t TVrnnkfiplH 


503 


08 




_ 








503 08 


TT,o a f T.nncrmPfirlriw 


1,427 


42 












1,427 42 


Eastham 


376 


42 


ATK 71 
tit) 1 I 


14 50 


99 00 


154 65 


253 fi5 


376 42 


ijaoiuauiptuij • 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Easton 


3,056 


34 












3,056 34 


Edgartown . . 


1,223 


10 












1,223 10 


Egremont ■ ■ 


391 


66 












391 66 


Hiiineici . . 


347 


74 








_ 


_ 


347 74 


Erving . , , 


1 689 


07 










_ 


1,689 07 




632 


14 










_ 


632 14 


Everett 


5,000 


00 










_ 


5,000 00 


Fairhaven , . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Fall T?ivpr 

X till in V u • • 


5,000 


00 




- 


- 


- 


: 


5,000 00 


Fft 1 mmif )"i 

JL tllliH-JUUll m • 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Fitchburg 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Florida . 


669 


98 












669 98 


Foxborough . 


2,002 


80 












2.002 80 


Framingham . 


5,000 


00 












5,000 00 


Franklin 


4,184 


79 












4,184 79 


Freetown 


902 


21 


1,170 92 


259 25 


268 71 


311 82 


580 53 


902 21 



* Lead sold 



P.D. 73 



31 



1 

Cities and Towns 


1927 


1928 


Required 
Expendi- 
ture 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 
received 
from 
State 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 


Gardner . . 


$5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


$5,000 00 


Gay Head 


40 30 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


40 30 


Georgetown . . 


873 57 


$1,013 48 


$674 35 


$136 00 


$487 42 


$623 42 


873 57 


Gill 


403 92 












403 92 


Gloucester • • 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Goshen . • 


169 27 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


169 27 


Gosnold . • 


513 31 




_ 


_ 


_ 




513 31 


Grafton . . . 


3,208 53 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,208 53 


Granby . 


486 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


486 00 


Granville • • 


339 73 


- 


- 


- 






339 73 


Great Barrington . 














5,000 00 


Greenfield 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Greenwich 


281 82 






_ 


_ 


_ 


281 82 


Groton 


1,779 15 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 779 15 


Groveland 


798 44 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


798 44 


Hadley . 


1,737 89 


_ 


_ 




_ 




1,737 89 


Halifax . 


586 85 


675 98 


/ 360 88 
\ *49 20 


\ 

} - 


658 92 


658 92 


586 85 


Hamilton . . 


2,183 02 


- 


- 




- 


- 


2,183 02 


Hampden 


272 13 












272 13 


Hancock 


276 08 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


276 08 


Hanover 


1,467 79 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




1,467 79 


Hanson . . • 


1,116 18 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


1 116 18 


Hardwick . . 


2,351 58 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2!351 58 


Harvard . 


927 84 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


927 84 


Harwich . 


1,400 07 


1,223 44 


/ 1419 49 
\ *123 44 




792 61 


616 08 


1,400 07 


Hatfield . 


1,858 07 


_ 






_ 


_ 


1,858 07 


Haverhill 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Hawley . . . 


124 31 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


124 31 


Heath 


201 05 


_ 






_ 




201 05 


Hingham 


5,000 00 


_ 






_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Hinsdale 


458 38 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


458 38 


Holbrook 


1,436 43 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,436 43 


Holden . 


1,356 24 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


1,356 24 


Holland . 


108 37 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


108 37 


Holliston. 


1,578 96 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


f • _ 


1,578 96 


Holyoke . 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Hopedale . • 


3,552 96 


_ 


_ 





_ 


_ 


3,552 96 


Hopkinton 


1,205 67 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,205 67 


Hubbardston 


551 42 












551 42 


Hudson . 


3,702 91 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,702 91 


Hull ... 


5,000 00 


_ 




_ 


_ 




5,000 00 


Huntington • . 


702 89 




_ 


_ 




_ 


702 89 


Ipswich . . . 


3,899 02 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,899 02 


Kingston. . . 


1,226 31 


1,233 89 


63 79 




362 62 


362 62 


1,226 31 


Lakeville . 


700 31 


700 31 


/ 169 70 
\ *171 84 


1 
J 


521 28 


521 28 


700 31 


Lancaster 


1,530 56 


_ 











1,530 56 


Lanesborough 


593 04 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




593 04 


Lawrence • • 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


5,000 00 


Lee .... 


2,739 24 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,739 24 


Leicester 


2,126 21 




_ 


_ 






2,126 21 


Lenox . . . 


3,170 37 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,170 37 


Leominster . . 


5,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


• _ 


5,000 00 


Leverett . 


247 62 




- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


247 62 


Lexington 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Leyden 


146 29 












146 29 


Lincoln . 


1,410 60 


_ 


_ 






z 


1,410 60 


Littleton 


853 37 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


853 37 


ljOIiglllcaClU W . • 


3,264 26 




— ■ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 2fi4 2fi 


Lowell . . 


5,000 00 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,000 00 


Ludlow . . . 


4,432 07 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


4,432 07 


Lunenberg 


825 72 


939 37 


/ 624 06 
\ *213 71 


\ 113,65 
i 


426 05 


539 70 


825 72 


Lynn 


5,000 00 











_ 


5,000 00 


Lynnfield . 


1,162 73 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,162 73 


Maiden . . . 


5^000 00 




_ 








5,000 00 


Manchester . 


5,000 00 






- 






5,000 00 


Mansfield . . 


4,542 62 


: 


_ 




: 


: 


4,542 62 


Marblehead 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Marion . 


1,940 36 












1,940 36 


Marlborough . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Marshfield 


2,068 19 












2,068 19 


Mash pee 


309 42 


1,030 91 


263 00 


687 47 


694 63 


1,382 10 


309 42 


Mattapoisett . 


1,326 19 












1,326 19 



* Lead sold 



32 



P.D. 73 





1927 


1928 


Cities and Towns 


ReQuired 


Tntol Mat 
A O Lai I> et 






Tools 
supplied 


Total 
Amount 


Required 




Expendi- 
ture 


Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


received 
from 


Expendi- 
tures 














State 




Maynard 














?4,230 12 


Medfield 


1 282 77 












1,282 77 


Medford 


c nnn nn 

O.UUU UU 












5,000 00 


Med way 


1 ATQ 1 1 

1,4/0 n 












1,478 11 


Melrose . 


n non nn 

0,UUU UU 












C AAA AA 

o.uuu 00 


Mendon . 


502 73 












502 73 


Merrimac 


1 014 54 












1,014 54 


Methuen 


k aaa nn 

O.UUU uu 












5,000 00 


Midaleborougn 


d *?i r nn 

7,01a UU 












A OIO AA 

4,oiO 00 


Middlenela 


145 10 












145 10 


Middleton 


681 49 












681 49 


Milford . 


^ nnn nn 












5,000 00 


■» * • 1 1 i 

Millbury 














3,086 71 


Millis 


1 438 02 












1,438 02 


AllllVllle . 


i vi 

l.UOO / 1 












1,035 71 


Milton 


C AAA no 
OfUUU UU 












e AAA AA 

5,000 00 


Monroe . 


419 10 












419 10 


Monson . 


1 RQQ 7R 

i ,oyy / o 












1,699 76 


Montague 


c AAA nn 

OfUUU UU 












5,000 00 


Monterey 


OOI AO 

Oil 34 












321 92 


Montgomery . 


in7 97 
1U< z/ 












107 27 


Mount Washington 


on or 
yu yo 












90 96 


Nahant . 


ijOiJi OO 












2,354 33 


Nantucket 


o«9 90 












3,862 23 


Natick 


nnn nn 

OfUUU UU 












5,000 00 


eeanam 


^ nnn 00 












C AAA AA 

5,000 00 


New Ashford 


AH fil 

ou 01 












60 61 


JNew rjealora 


C AAA AA 
O.UUU UU 












C AAA AA 

5,000 00 


New Braintree 


9fi= Q9 
ZOO 












265 92 


New Marlborough 


#11 Orl 












711 54 


New Salem 


340 1 1 












340 11 


Newbury 


1,191 92 












1,191 92 


Newburyport 


5,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


Newton . 


5,000 00 












C AAA AA 

5,000 00 


rN on oik • • 


829 40 












829 40 


North Adams. 


nnn nn 












5,000 00 


North Andover 


4 760 94 












4,760 94 


No. Attleborough . 


AAA AA 

o,uuu UU 












C AAA AA 

5,000 00 


JNortn rJrooKnela . 


1,516 56 




z 


z 


z 




1,516 56 


North Reading 


826 46 


$1,222 25 


1 $645 85 
\ *4 50 


} $130 00 


_ 


$130 00 


826 46 




C AAA AA 
O.UUU UU 












^ onn no 


Northborough 


A CO OO 

yoo 00 












953 83 


Northbridge . 


C AAA AA 
O.UUU UU 












5,000 00 


Northneld 


1 111 38 












1,111 38 


Norton . 


1 424 37 












1,424 37 


Norwell . 


810 99 


1,187 38 


f 757 20 

1 +9nn nn 
y 1 zuu uu 


346 50 


475 64 


822 14 


810 99 


Norwood . 


C AAA AA 

o,uuu UU 






) 






r AAA AA 

5,000 00 


Oak Bluffs 


1 7RO 4.1 
1,/OZ 41 












1,762 41 


Oakham . 


217 70 












217 70 


Orange . 


Q 1 97 7Q 

o,izs <y 












3,127 79 


Orleans . 


1 (V7 9 19 

1,0/ Z IO 












1,572 13 


Otis 


90c Cfi 

zoo 00 












zoo 00 


Oxford . 


1 TOC 
1,/ZO 0* 












1,725 64 


Palmer . 


K. AAA AA 
D,UUu UU 












5,000 00 


Paxton 


AOt 1 ft 
4Z 1 IO 












421 16 


Peabody 


z. AAA AA 

o,uuu UU 












5,000 00 


Pelham . 


901 Q=. 
Z.I 1 JO 












291 95 


Pembroke 


1 ,uoo oy 


1 7=.Q R$i 

i,< oy OO 


643 00 


OCT AA 
OOf UU 


RQ9 79 
oyz / z 


1 ako to 
1 , Uoy / z 


1,068 59 


Pepperell 


1 7S1 ^ 
1 , / 80 OO 












1,783 55 


Peru 


1 RT AO 

10/ 4Z 












167 42 


Petersham 


fiO/1 AT 
OZ4 U/ 












824 07 


Phillipston 


9AQ /1A 
ZUo IV 












203 40 


Pittsfield 


K AAA AA 

o,uuu UU 












r- f\f\(\ AA 

5,000 00 


Plainfield 


180 31 












180 31 


Plainville 


OA? 1 1 
OU/ 11 


1 1 sn 1 =. 

l,loU IO 


52 60 


97fi nn 
z< uu 


91 R 9n 
ZIO ZU 


aqo on 
%yz zu 


807 11 


Plymouth 


5.000 00 












C AAA AA 

5,000 00 


Plympton 


361 99 


616 40 


178 40 


254 41 


337 51 


591 92 


361 99 


Prescott . 


151 65 












151 65 


Princeton 


603 93 












603 93 


Provincetown. . 


2,067 01 












2,067 01 


Quincy . 


5.000 00 












5,000 00 


Randolph 


1,860 01 












1,860 01 


Raynham 


859 27 


841 18 


223 65 




280 40 


262 31 


859 27 



* Lead sold 
t Elm beetle work 



P.D. 73 



33 





1927 


1928 


Cities and Towns 


T-? pn ii i rpH 

Expendi- 
ture 


Total Npt 
XL* A pencil" 

ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Total 

A mminf 

received 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 
















State 




Heading . 


$5,000 00 


_ 


_ 




- 


_ 


_ 


$5,000 00 


KBDOOOWl . . 


929 27 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


929 27 


Revere 


O f UUU uu 








— 






5 000 00 


Richmond • 


381 30 














381 30 


Rochester 


640 19 








_ 






640 19 


Rockland 


3 Q70 00 








- 






o,y<u uu 


Rockport 


2 282 93 














2,282 93 


Rowe • 


*175 56 














175 56 


Rowley . 


586 03 


$5r$6 08 


/ $339 24 
\ *225 23 


1 
/ 




$487 68 


$487 68 


586 03 


•a l 

xvoyaiston • • 


645 44 














645 44 


Russell 


2 133 48 














2,533 48 


Rutland . 


654 57 








— . 






654 57 


Salem 


r. nnn no 








— 






O.UUU uu 


Salisbury 


1 222 22 








- 






1,222 22 


Qanrliafiolrl 


300 "iQ 








— ■ 






300 59 


Sandwich 


1,088 36 


1,410 84 


r 84 70 
\ *78 00 


\ 
/ 


$314 00 


522 89 


836 89 


1,088 36 


a 

fcaugus 


4 572 32 














4 W2 32 


Savoy . 


131 07 








— 






131 07 


Scituate • ■ 


4,401 05 








— 






4,401 06 




1/775 15 














1^775 15 


Sharon • • 


2 222 03 








— 






2)222 03 


OUCUlClU • • • 


664 61 








- 






664 61 


SKpI Wi 1 rn p 

UUCIUU1 11C • • 


1 338 08 








— 






1,388 08 


Slier born ■ * 


729 26 








— 






729 26 


oQiney . • • 


1,244 44 














1,244 44 


Sh ronrflhi l rv 

OtlXc WO U 111 j « • 


2,509 55 








— 






2!509 55 


SVi ii tAaKi irv 


193 56 














193 56 


Somerset > 


2,035 39 














2,035 39 


Soinerville • • 


5 000 00 








_ 






5 000 00 


Smith TTqHipv 


3 3R2 14 








- 






3 3fi2 14 




403 02 








- 






403 02 


Qai i f H VirtTni i & n 


1 107 fifi 








— 






1,507 66 


Sou.th.brid.ge • . 


r. OOO OO 








— 






^ 000 00 

XJf\JK/\J \J\J 


Sni 1 1 h wi p L" 


927 80 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


927 80 


Spencer • 


2,148 01 








— 






2,148 01 


Sr^pinofiplH 


1 000 00 








- 






i'ooo on 


Sterling . 


712 88 








— 






712 88 


btock bridge . 


2 514 39 








— 






2,514 39 


StrtnpVi am 

U b\JLl\Z Lick III . • 


4 372 54 








— 






4 372 54 


St nuffh tnn 

ULU Ll^ll Lv_/il • • 


Q 4fiQ 4Q 








— 






3!469 49 


Stow 


834 30 


975 45 


/ 42 05 
\ *214 48 


) 
J 


_ 


744 52 


744 52 


834 30 


Sf" 1 1 rHri n cfp 


721 72 








— 






721 72 


Sudbury . , 


983 40 








— 






983 40 


Sn nripr lanrl 


644 64 








— 






644 64 


Sutton 


1 OIS 39 








— 






1 018 32 


uwaiiipatutb • 


1 000 00 

(J , \J\J\J \J\J 








— 






1 000 00 

tJ t \J\J\J \J\J 


Swan<apa 


1,010 to 








— 






1 513 48 


Taunton . . 


c OOO OO 
0,UUU UU 








— 






c 000 00 

Q t KJ\J\J UU 


Templeton . 


1 003 13 








— 






1 Q03 13 


Tewksbury « • 


1 480 27 














1 480 27 


Tisbury . . • 


1 824 75 








— 






1 824 75 


TnllanH 


191 47 








— 






191 47 




1 9TQ 1ft 
1,41 i) OO 








— 






1 27 Q 1ft 


1"* A w n « p n H 


1 121 61 








— 






1 121 61 


Truro 


410 28 


515 28 


64 25 




105 00 


124 95 


OOO ft; 


410 28 


Tyngsborough , 


567 81 


1 017 91 


201 75 




450 00 


ooo 72 

OUU / 6 


I OU / £• 


567 81 


Tynngham . . 


OOQ Oil 








— 






223 24 




ooy oo 








— 






ouy 00 


TTt-KHH cfp 


o.yoo iz 














3 Qfil 1 9 


WaU-pfiplH 


c ooo oo 
o,uuu uu 








- 






c OOO OO 
o,uuu UU 


Wales 


227 00 














227 00 


Walrtrtlp 


o,uuu uu 








- % 






1 OOO 00 
o,uuu uu 


Waltham 


o,uuu uu 














1 000 00 
OiUuU uu 


Ware 


ft, /II 0/ 














4 741 57 


are ha m . . 


4,904 70 




- 






- 


- 


4 904 70 


Warren . 


2,640 13 














9 R40 1 3 

10 


Warwiplr 

v* al nllh a . 


263 43 














263 43 


Washington . 


116 88 














116 88 


Watertown 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


Wayland 
Webster . 


1,958 77 














1,958 77 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 


WeUesley 


5,000 00 














5,000 00 



* Lead sold 



34 



P.D. 37 





1927 


1928 


Cities and Towns 












Total 




Required 
Expendi- 
ture 


Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 


Private 
Work 


Reimburse- 
ment 


Tools 
supplied 


Amount 
received 
from 


Required 
Expendi- 
tures 














State 




Wellfleet 


S^ft 1 . 77 




/ $164 16 
\ *7 14 


J $97 40 


$204 37 


$301 77 


$505 77 


YV CUUcll a • a 


512 14 












512 14 


Wenham 


1,364 56 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,364 56 


West Boylston 


685 16 


_ 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


685 16 


West Bridgewater 


1,140 72 


1 1 0A AQ 
l,luO 4o 


/ 1090 00 
\ *142 40 


J 




OU4 Zo 


1,140 72 


West Brookfield . 


681 92 




— 






mm .< 


681 92 


West Newbury 


485 02 


484 65 


J 134 70 
\ *113 70 


I 

J ~ 


268 58 


268 21 


485 02 


West Springfield . 


5,000 00 




— 




— 


— 


5,000 00 


West Stockbridge . 


594 07 




— 


mm 


_ 


_ 


594 07 


West Tisbury 


366 92 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


366 92 


Westborough 


1,762 81 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


1,762 81 


Westfield 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Westford. 


2,442 46 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,442 46 


Westhampton 


172 93 




— 


— 


— 


— 


172 93 


Westminster . 


584 29 






— 




— 


584 29 


Weston . 


3,494 66 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,494 66 


Westport 


2,712 62 


— 




- 


— J >, 1 


— 


2,712 62 


Westwood 


1,671 13 






— 


'■«-£ 


— 


1,671 13 


Weymouth 


5,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000 00 


Whateley 


638 20 


■ • ' ■' 




— 


— 


— 


638 20 


Whitman 


3,729 78 




* ^JWw 


— 


— 


— 


3,729 78 


Wilbraham 


1,616 38 






— 


— 


— 


1,616 38 


Williamsburg 


841 61 


— 


S- 


— 


— 


— 


841 61 


WiUiamstown . 


3,126 96 






_ 


— 


— 


3,126 96 


Wilmington 


1,277 65 






— 


— 


- 


1,277 65 


Winchendon . . 


3,295 34 


— 




— 


mm . 


— 


3,295 34 


Winchester 


5,000 00 


— 






m 


— 


5,000 00 


Windsor . 


202 69 




- 








202 69 


Winthrop 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Woburn . 


5,000 00 












5,000 00 


Worcester 


5.000 00 












5,000 00 


Worthington . 


268 48 












268 48 


Wrentham 


1,276 22 












1,276 22 


Yarmouth 


1,291 56 












1,291 56 



* Lead sold 



Public Document 



No. 73 



Cnmmmuuf alth at iBaaaarliuactts 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Commissioner of Conservation 

AND 

State Forester 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1928 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 



Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration 

and Finance 

1300-5-'29. No. 5519 



OUTLINE OF REPORT 

This report is divided for convenience and economy into four parts : — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of Con* 
servation. 

Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 

Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume as Public Document No. 73. 
Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 25. 
Part IV is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 98. 



Stye QhimmnmittaitlHjf Ha5Harl|itB^tts 

ParfT. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CONSERVATION 

The annual report of the Department of Conservation is herewith submitted. 
During the past year meetings of the Commissioner and Directors were held as 
usual at which policies of the department and matters connected with the divisions 
were discussed. The records of these meetings are on file in the office. 

In early May Mr. Frank B. Cummings, Director of the Division of Animal In- 
dustry, resigned, his resignation to take effect on June 1, and the governor ap- 
pointed Mr. Evan F. Richardson of Millis to fill the vacancy. Mr. Richardson 
is well qualified to hold this position by practical knowledge and by experience. 

The department has done much cooperative work with the Federal Government, 
and also with the state departments of Agriculture, Health and Public Works. 

A special committee to consider and report on the shellfish situation was ap- 
pointed in accordance with Chapter 44 of the Acts of 1928, of which Senator 
Donald W. Nicholson was chairman. 

The chief forester and the forester in western Massachusetts have spent con- 
siderable time in locating land and advising the chairman of the Department of 
Conservation of the Daughters of the American Revolution in regard to acquiring 
a D. A. R. Forest. The project includes the acquisition of this land and the turn- 
ing of it over to the state for management. 

Forest Conservation. 

It is the duty of the state forester to promote the perpetuation, extension and 
proper management of the public and private lands of the commonwealth. In 
the pursuance of this duty, the state forester and his assistants interview land 
owners, give advice in planting, sell trees for reforestation, acquire lands for state 
forests and plant and care for these forests, and protect the woodlands from 
forest fires. There is also a large amount of educational work done, in lecturing, 
organizing and teaching young people, encouraging granges, women's clubs and 
other like organizations to take an interest in forestry. 

Special seasons set apart by the President and the Governor for intensive for- 
estry work or forest fire prevention help in this wise propaganda, and the teachers 
in the public schools cooperate at such times. 

Anything that calls attention to the need for increasing our forest growth is 
welcomed. For with the passing of years, our timber supply in Massachusetts 
has been so depleted that we can no longer supply our wood-using industries, and 
timber for building is imported, or else another form of construction used. A 
heavy growth of trees is advisable for other reasons than timber supply, also. We 
must remember our brooks, rivers and ponds, which the surrounding forest growth 
helps to fill. For water supply, power and drainage we must keep the water 
sheds well covered with forest trees. 

And neither should we neglect the aesthetic side of the forest situation. Bare 
pasture lands and old fields can be made to grow forests, where in a few years 
will be sport, recreation and solitude. Berries will grow, birds will sing and hikers 
and campers will have an abundance of country suited to their purpose. In these 
days of large, congested communities, the space and freedom of these wooded 
areas has become a necessity for health and efficiency. 

Insect Depredations. 

Although the only insects with which this department is legally concerned are 
the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, the prevalence of other insects is of interest 
to all who have to do with trees, forest, orchard and shade. 

The gypsy moth, particularly, has given us great concern during the past four 
years. Though we have called attention in our reports each year to the increasing 
numbers of this insect, in fact in our report of the year 1924, we advised against 
a feeling of false security in regard to it, yet conditions have rapidly grown worse. 

In Governor Fuller's budget recommendations for the year 1925, he said, "May 
I also call your attention to the gypsy and brown-tail moth laws. These 



4 



P.D. 73 



were passed at a time when this pest was rapidly spreading and constituted a 
menace of state-wide concern. Now, owing to parasites and other causes, the 
special emergency to meet which these laws were framed, no longer exists. The 
problem has become one which each community can handle according to its needs." 
This statement had a state-wide effect on communities; many felt that they no 
longer needed to appropriate any money for suppressing the gypsy moth if the 
attitude of the state was to be that expressed by the Governor. Much pressure 
had to be put into the work of urging towns to appropriate the necessary money 
and the demonstration given by the rapid increase of moths during the following 
seasons has at last resulted in making the problem again resume its proper place 
in the towns' budgets. 

The appropriations cut down at that time, and the continuing feeling that it 
was unnecessary to spend much money on this work, the readiness of the munici- 
palities to follow the example of the state, have all contributed to the present con- 
dition of affairs. 

The satin moth has been very destructive to poplar and willow, and the oriental 
hag moth has again made its appearance in large numbers in Boston and vicinity. 
In the last two years, the last named insect has spread from Boston to a number 
of cities and towns within a radius of ten miles. 

Last summer the white pine weevil was very noticeable on white pine through- 
out the state, it being particularly bad in eastern and southern Massachusetts. 
Information regarding methods of combating these insects was given by this 
department, whenever requested. 

Conservation of the Health of Domestic Animals. 

The Division of Animal Industry has charge of the control, prevention and sup- 
pression of contagious diseases in domestic animals. 

Over three thousand dogs were reported during the year, because of having ' 
bitten persons, because they show symptoms of rabies, or because they had been in 1 
contact with rabid animals. The number of positive cases of rabies has increased 
from 797 in 1927 to 862 in 1928. Much of the danger of this dread disease could , 
be eliminated if the local authorities would enforce the present laws in handling ; 
the stray and unlicensed dog. 

The prevention of hog cholera demands an expenditure of upwards of $30,000 
and nearly one hundred thousand treatments are given yearly. 

The live stock market at Brighton is the only market of its kind in the United , 
States dealing with dairy cattle. Considerable time and attention has been given 
to this branch of our service, resulting in improved conditions. 

The increased indemnity paid to farmers for cattle reacting to the tuberculin j 
test is to commence December 1st, and this increase, with the awakened interest 1 
all over the State in reference to this work, has persuaded many farmers to file 
requests to place their herds under State and Federal supervision. The regula- 
tions to the sale of milk have also been a strong factor in this movement, and j 
before another year expires, Massachusetts will have made a rapid stride forward 
in this work. 

Conservation of "Wild Life. 
Any plan for the adequate protection of wild life must cover a period of years. 
The objectives of the Division of Fisheries and Game were laid down some years j 
ago and are being approached as rapidly as appropriations will permit. These' i 
consist largely in developing existing game farms and fish hatcheries to their \ 
maximum production before the establishment of additional plants. This in- : 
volves putting all buildings, pens and pools into first-class plrysical condition; a \ 
development of onr facilities for the production of pond fish (as distinguished 
from those species which we can artificially propagate) on a financial scale com- 5 
parable to the cost of operating our fish hatcheries; the enlargement of our units j 
to carry on salvage operations to meet all of the requirements of a given yearjj 
increasing attention to the breeding of our native game birds as distinguished 
from foreign species (particularly our native Bob- White quail) ; the produc- J 
tion of our native fish instead of the introduction of foreign species ; the importa- 



P.D. 73 



5 



tion of such animals as are native to our own covers (as, for example, the white 
hare) ; and research and study into diseases of all species of wild animal life. 

The protection to the wild life stock is first to be supplied by the maintenance 
of an adequate force of wardens, suitably uniformed and equipped. The primary 
work of law enforcement is to be supplemented by a more systematic reduction 
to a harmless minimum of predatory species; the establishment of permanent wild 
life sanctuaries owned and operated by the state ; persistent education of the pub- 
lic to an interest and appreciation of the wild life, and restrained, conservative 
exploitation of the same. 

The foregoing program cannot be realized in one year, or a decade; but so 
long as the major objectives are kept always in view and the annual advancement 
based on sound business practices, we will come nearer to passing along to future 
generations an adequate stock of desirable wild life than can ever result from 
changing of policies and constant shifting of .objectives. 

The Division of Fisheries and Game, during the past year, has functioned 
along the above lines. Much has been done in the consolidation of gains of past 
years to make them permanent. Some additions have been made to the game 
farms and fish hatcheries; our pond cultural and salvage operations have broad- 
ened out ; and there have been permanent additions made to both the inland and 
coastal warden service. While the enlargement of permanent wild life sanctuaries 
has been extremely slow, nevertheless some progress was made during the year. 

Standish Monument Reservation. 

During the summer of 1928, 108,585 persons visited the reservation. These 
visitors came from every state and territory in the union, and more foreign coun- 
tries were represented than ever before especially the number of visitors from 
Mexico and South America was unusually large. The number of persons ascend- 
ing the tower was 7,271. 

In the spring of 1928, the legislature made provision for the erection of a com- 
fort station on the grounds near the tower, appropriating the sum of $3,000. for 
this much needed improvement. This building has been built at a cost of $2,983.51. 
The construction is of concrete blocks, stuccoed inside and outside. All the work, 
including the plumbing, has been done by our own employees. This comfort 
station was much needed on account of the very large number of visitors to this 
historic spot. 

The repairs on the statue of Myles Standish, which was injured in the electric 
storm of August 26, 1922, have not yet been completed owing to lack of funds. 
It is hoped that the legislature of 1929 will make available the sum necessary to 
rebuild the lower part of the statue and restore the completed statue to its place. 

State Forests. 

During the year 1928 only four lots of land were paid for by this department. 
These lots were all part of forests of which takings have been made, so that no 
increase to the total holdings was made by these transactions. 

The list of lots is as follows : 

Name of Forest Acres 

Marthas Vineyard 338. 

Shawme ..." 16.52 

Total . . 354.52 

Recommendations.. 
Recommendations for legislation regarding the Division of Fisheries and Game 
will be found in the annual report of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 



6 



P.D. 73 



PART II 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

The work of the Forestry 7 Division has been carried on as usual, the work of 
advice and assistance to the public in tree planting and forest management pro- 
gressing well. The forest extension work, partially financed by the Federal Gov- 
ernment, is broadening its scope and is helping to promote forestry interest, 
especially among the young generation. 

Organization. 

William A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner and State Forester 
Charles 0. Bailey, Secretary 
Harold 0. Cook, Chief Forester 

D. C. A. GalarneaU, Forester in. Western Massachusetts 
Frank L. Haynes, Forester, Land Purchase and Surveys 
James Morris, Forester, Nurseries 

Robert B. Parmenter, Assistant Forester, Reforestation and Extension Work 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden 
George A. Smith, Chief Moth Suppressor 
John P. Crowe, Supervising Fire Warden 

District Fire Wardens District Moth Suppressors 

1. James E. Moloy, Woburn 1. Michael H. Donovan, Beverly 

2. John H. Montle, Fall River 2. Charles E. Mace, Bolton 

3. William Day, Wareham 3. John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill 

4. Charles L. Woodman, Manchaug 4. Clarence W. Parkhurst, Foxboro 

5. Albert R. Ordway, Westfield 5. Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay 

6. Joseph L. Peabody, Winchendon 6. Harry B. Ramsay, Worcester 

7. Verne J. Fitzroy, Shelburne Falls 7. Grover C. Twiss, Holyoke 

8. Lincoln Crowell, Sandwich 

Woodlot Examinations. 
We have always found that the system of meeting the woodland owners oh their 
land and advising them as to the proper treatment of their woodlots is a very 
satisfactory procedure both for the department and for the owner. We average 
from sixty to seventy-five such requests each year. The number this year consti- 
tutes a record. It is interesting to note the number of people who have requested 
examinations on account of insects or diseases threatening their stands of timber. 
In fact most of the examinations of single, ornamental trees were brought about 
by the same sort of interest. As is usual, those who seek advice on forest plant- 
ing head the list. 

Problem No. No. Acres 

Improvement Cutting 18 1,185 

Insects and Diseases 13 345 

Planting .29 3,050 

Marketing 10 1,385 

Fire Damage 1 30 

Ornamental Trees 17 

Taxation 2 280 



90 6,255 

Exhibits. 

The department had its usual large exhibit at the Eastern States Exposition at 
Springfield and placed small exhibits at the New Ocean House, Swampscott, for 
the State Federation of Women's Clubs ; at the Underwood School in Newton and 
Newton High School. 

The stereomotograph picture machine was loaned to several organizations, and 
the Children's Museums of Boston and Cambridge reported that it had great 
educational value. 



P.D. 73 



7 



Lectures. 

Such requests as have come to us for speakers from granges, women's clubs, 
luncheon clubs, and kindred organizations have been honored by the department 
and during the past year various members of our staff lectured before sixty-five 
organizations in all. 

The following meetings outside of the state were attended by representatives of 
the department: American Fish and Game Protective Association, New York 
City; Association of State Foresters, Wooster, Ohio; New England Section of 
Foresters, Keene, New Hampshire. 

Forest Survey. 

The forest survey which this department has been making over a period of 
years was continued this summer by the mapping of Bristol County. Only Dukes 
and Nantucket Counties remain to be mapped. The survey this year was in charge 
of R. Milton Hick, one of our surveyors, who had two temporary assistants. 

State Plantations. 
The policy of taking over private lands, planting them, and then allowing the 
owners to redeem them within ten years according to the terms of the reforesta- 
tion law, has been given up because when such lots were not taken back by the 
owners, they became the property of the Commonwealth, and as a result, the 
department was coming into possession of a lot of scattered small plantations, 
difficult to care for. Where these state-owned plantations are near existing state 
forests, they have been combined with them for convenience of administration. 
Where they cannot be so combined, they are called state plantations. The work 
done on the first class of lots is included under state forests. 

Hardy — Ashburnham Planted 10,000 trees. 

Brewster-Plymouth Planted 30,000 trees. 

Harrington — Ashburnham Release cut 25 acres 

Robertson — Barre Release cut 20 acres. 

Civic League — Nantucket Plowed fire line. 

Flint— Andover Planted 1,000 pines. 

Peckens — Ashburnham Release cut 20 acres. 

Nurseries. 

The outstanding feature of our nursery work during 1928 was the breaking 
and clearing of an additional six acres of land at the new Clinton Nursery. As a 
result, beginning next spring, we hope to produce even better stock because for 
the first time in several years we have sufficient land to properly fertilize and 
revitalize areas from which stock has been removed. For several years past, we 
have been obliged to reset stock immediately in soil from which trees for current 
shipment had been taken. We shall continue to break land at Clinton until we 
have approximately twenty acres available for tree production. 

The state forest nurseries at Savoy and October Mountain have served their 
purpose and have been discontinued. 

We now have sales nurseries at Amherst, Winchendon, Clinton, Bridgewater, 
and Barnstable. Our state forest nurseries are located at Swann Forest, near 
Great Barrington; Erving Forest, at Erving; Myles Standish Forest, at South 
Carver; and Shawme Forest, on the Sandwich-Mashpee Road. 

During the spring we shipped over three million trees from the combined 
nurseries. This stock was distributed as follows: 



Sale 1,499,000 

State Forests 819,000 

Town Forests 242,000 

State Institutions . 576,000 

Reforestation Lots 40,000 



3,176,000 

Because of difficulty in classifying the age of various stocks we have not in- 
cluded our fall shipments in the above total. Such shipments will be listed in 
next spring's totals. 



8 



P.D. 73 



White pine weevil, hitherto considered, more or less of a periodic pest, has been 
prevalent in great quantities over Massachusetts for the past five years. The life 
habits of this pest are being studied closely with a view towards determining the 
best economic methods of extermination. 

Red pine is not attacked seriously by this weevil and since we have a fairly 
large quantity of this stock both in three and four year classes, we recommend 
that prospective purchasers take advantage of this opportunity to secure this 
species for planting in either pure or mixed stands. 

Experiments are being conducted at Amherst Nursery to determine the effect 
of different fertilizers on nursery stock. 

The total content of all nurseries is at present about 17,000,000 trees embracing 
white pine, red pine, Scotch pine, Norway spruce and white spruce. These species 
are variously suited to conditions in Massachusetts. 

White Pine Blister Rust. 
The Massachusetts Department of Agriculture in co-operation with the 
United States Department of Agriculture is conducting an intensive campaign to 
prevent the spread of the white pine blister rust in the state. During the fiscal 
year 1928, control work was performed on 239,033 acres of land. In this work 
521,360 wild and 31,815 cultivated currant and gooseberry bushes were uprooted 
as a protection to nearby white pines. The disease was very much in evidence on 
the leaves of currant and gooseberry bushes during the summer, due undoubtedly 
to the prevalence of unusually moist conditions. To date (November 30, 1928) 
the disease has been reported on white pine in 279 of the 355 cities and towns in 
the Commonwealth. 

Extension Forestry. 

During the past year extension forestry in this state has progressed very favor- 
ably and more progress has been shown than in the past two years. A great many 
lectures have been given, demonstrations held and three or four tours have been 
carried out, all of which have shown results. During 1928 the extension forester 
with the county agents, established many demonstration plots at which meetings 
have been held. A great deal of profitable discussion was started and the result 
has been that more work on woodlots has been done than ever before, both thin- 
ning and liberation cutting. Our policy is to encourage the making of Christmas 
tree plantations and new ones are being started. Scout organizations and camp 
carried out, all of which have shown results. During 1928 the extension forester, 
has laid out a definite plan of work for the counties with a goal towards which 
to strive and in each case the goal has been approached but not reached. 

The work is divided naturally into three classes : 

1. Thinning of young and immature stands to increase and speed up their 
growth and at the same time pruning some of the better trees for good quality 
lumber. 

2. Liberation or release cutting. 

3. Planting. 

Three counties were chosen in which to start the work rather than to try to 
spread the work too thin over the entire state. The thinning problem was under- 
taken in Worcester County with the following practices recommended : 

(a) Cut poor trees such as: 

1. Crooked trees. 

2. Knotty trees. 

3. Forked trees. 

4. Dead or dying trees. 

5. Decayed trees. 

6. Slow-growing trees. 

7. Trees, even good ones where they are too thick. 

(b) Leave good trees such as: 

1. Tall, straight trees. 

2. Well shaped trees. 

3. Good timber trees. 



PX>. 73 



9 



4. Fast-growing trees. 

5. Leave enough trees per acre. 

6. Sound trees, 
(c) Then you will have: 

X. Plenty of firewood. 

2. Good quality lumber. 

3. Fence posts, ties and poles. 

4. Lumber for use on the farm. 

The methods used to teach the thinning problem were as follows : 

1. News articles informing people what the project will accomplish. 

2. Visit the county agent, securing a list of prospects. 

3. Make personal visits to the prospects with the county agent. 

4. Meet with local leaders and community leaders, discussing the situation, 
need of work and what means we are to employ to accomplish the desired results. 

5. Send circular letters to the prospects, giving information and helpful 
direction. 

6. Visit the county agent to line up demonstrations. 

7. New notes on demonstrations as to time and place. 

8. Send circular letters to prospect list, giving schedule of demonstrations. 

9. Enroll members at the demonstrations. 

10. Follow up leads obtained at the demonstrations. 

11. News items on lectures before communities. 

12. Lectures before communities. 

13. Set up window displays and exhibits, etc. 

14. Check up the results. 

In Middlesex County the project was liberation or release cutting. Although 
this liberation or release cutting problem was the major one undertaken in Mid- 
dlesex County, nevertheless, pruning, tninning and planting were not overlooked 
and if, as it turned out to be the case, the project was thinning, the methods of 
teaching were to : — 

1. Meet with county agent and obtain a list of prospects. 

2. Write pertinent news articles regarding the project for publication in 
the county farm paper and local newspaper. 

3. Make personal visits with the agent to influential prospects in a com- 
munity. 

4. Establish demonstration plots on land owned by these influential pros- 
pects. 

5. Send out news notes regarding demonstration trip to be held in the near 
future. 

6. Hold demonstration trip with follow-up cards to enroll members. 

7. News notes on the result of the trip. 

8. Give lectures to granges, community meetings and other organizations. 

9. Set up window displays, exhibits, etc. 

10. Send circular letters to prospects and co-operators, giving them new 
methods of farm woodlot improvement. 

11. Make farm visits either with or without the agent. 

12. Check up on the results. 

Barnstable County was chosen as a likely field for establishing the planting 
project, but after the project had been submitted to the *trustees of the county 
and voted down, the extension forester spread the work over the two counties 
already mentioned. The directors felt that unless there was an explicit call for 
this line of work, it would be better for them to expend their time and money on 
projects that were called for. 

In support of the thinning project the extension forester sent out a series of 
six letters giving methods of woodlot improvement, kinds of trees to take out, 
information in regard to a demonstration woodlot that was thinned in Ashby, 
with the results obtained, and also a letter in regard to the timber tax. 

In support of the liberation cutting project, a series of four letters were sent 



* Trustees for County Aid in Agriculture. 



10 



P.D. 73 



out telling the reader just how it would be possible for him to improve the 
sprout woodlot which he owns. 

In the outline showing methods of teaching the thinning project, mention was 
made of establishing demonstration plots on woodland owned by influential 
members of a community. With this idea in mind the county agent and the 
extension forester established three in Middlesex County and one in Plymouth 
County. The first one was established in Ashby. The owner was willing to 
cooperate with us and we marked the trees to be taken out on one-quarter acre. 
He had them cut and piled and kept the figures of the cost. Within a few weeks 
following this, we held a meeting and discussed the possibilities and probabil- 
ities of others obtaining the same result if they put into practice the methods 
which they learned at this meeting. 

The next plot was established in Pepperell where a five-acre place of 17- 
year-old white pine was located and with the owner's permission we thinned and 
pruned one-quarter acre which later was increased to one-half acre. Two meet- 
ings were held demonstrating the advisability of thinning and how to improve 
the looks of the lot. At the same time we pruned a few of the outstanding trees 
for better quality lumber. The result in this case has been that the owner has 
gone over practically the entire *five acres, taken out about seven cords of wood 
and knocked the limbs oft' the remaining trees. He is intending to go in again 
to do further thinning, and the cost of this has been only $40. The third dem- 
onstration plot was established in Tyngsborough. Here one-quarter acre was 
laid off, some birch, dead pine, crooked, deformed trees and others showing poor 
growth, were removed, and some of the remaining ones pruned to a height of 
16 feet. One-quarter acre adjoining was laid off as a check plot and measure- 
ments on both plots taken for further study. Two demonstrations have been 
held on this plot and these have already led to other individuals doing much the 
same on their own woodlots. 

On the plot in Hanover the county agent, the blister rust agent and the ex- 
tension forester removed all of the trees that were dead, dying and of poor shape, 
leaving those that were best at the time. We then pruned a few to a height of 
16 feet and placed a sign at either approach, calling the attention of the passers- 
by to the work. A great many favorable comments have been the result. (With 
the list of prospective woodland co-operators at hand, together with requests 
from other sources, work has already been done in the following counties, carry- 
ing on work as specified: 

Plymouth County. 

Farm Lecture Scout AH 



Town Visit Tour Attendance Camps Club Demonstration 

Norwell ... 2 . . 35 . . 4 Thinning 

Hanover ... 1 1 . . . . . . Thinning 

Middleboro . ... . . . . . . . . Thinning 

Bridgewater .... 1 

Rochester .... 1 

Lakeville 1 . . 6 

Plymouth ... 1 
So. Duxbury 1 
Kingston ... 1 

Hanover . . . . . . . . Pruning 

Hingham ... 1 

Middlesex County. 

Carlisle ... 1 

Pepperell ... 2 .. .. .. .. 12 

Chelmsford 2 

Dracut ... 1 .. .. .. 3 15 

Ashby ... 2 .. .. .. 1 

Lincoln ... 1 
Wilmington 2 

Tyngsboro 1 .. 15 .. .. 12 



P.D. 73 11 

Farm Lecture Scout 4H 

Town Visit Tour Attendance Camps Club Demonstration 

Ashby ... 1 

Marlboro ... 1 

Acton ... 2 

Townsend ... 6 . . 60 

Natick ... 1 

Hopkinton .... . . . . . . 1 

Concord ... 2 
Sherborn ... 2 
Groton 3 

Waltham .. .. .. .. 20 

Dunstable 2 

Billerica .. 40 ' . . 1 

Sudbury 

Essex County. 
Middleton 1 .. 1 

Georgetown .... . . . . 5 

Newburyport .... . . . . 5 

Newbury . . . . 4 

Boxford ... 1 .. .. 1 

Haverhill 1 
Amesbury 1 

Methuen . . . . 4 

Andover ... 2 . . . . 3 

Norfolk County. 
Walpole . . . 1 .. .. .. .... 

Wellesley . . 65 

Millis .. 35G.S. .. 

Medfield ... 1 

East "Weymouth ... . . . . . . 1 

Needham . . . . . . a 

Cohasset ... 1 

Bristol County. 
Segreganset 1 . . 60 

Raynham 1 
Dighton ... 1 

Hampshire County. 
Northampton Called on countv agent 

Plainfield .. . 20 

Enfield .. .. .. 1 Camp 

Worcester County. 
Bolton ... 2 .. .. .. .. 15 

Harvard ... 1 
Boylston ... 1 
Westboro ... 1 

Holden . . llo (2) . . 

Barre ... 1 
Westminster 1 
Athol ... 1 

Southbridge . . 1 . . . . . . ' . . 

Phillipston . . 1 .. .. .. 

Dudlev ... 1 
Charlton ... 1 
Leominster 1 
Sturbridge .... . . 50 

Hudson . . 25 .... 

Sterling ... 1 .. .. .. .. 2 

Lunenburg 1 

Baldwinville .... . . 100 

Sutton . > . . 1 



12 



P.D. 73 



The extension forester spoke over the radio on January 9, discussing phases of 
forestry in question and answer form, met county agents of Barnstable County 
and Berkshire County, explained work that he wished to carry on in those coun- 
ties, spoke at the Y, M. C. A. here in Boston to the boy scouts, with 25 present. 
He attended a conference in New Haven where the forestry program of Con- 
necticut was discussed, set up window displays in Worcester and Marlboro, set 
up an exhibit in Swampscott at the annual meeting of the Federation of Women's 
Clubs, attended a saw mill demonstration at Suncook, N. EL, spending three days 
at a private boys' camp on Mashpee Island, Buzzards Bay ; met the club agents 
in Great Barrington on a woodlot, explaining the forestry project which they 
could carry out in their own counties. This woodlot on which the meeting was 
held had been properly thinned and pruned so it was a very good plot on which 
to demonstrate his work. He made a trip to Brunswick, Maine, with Austin Cary 
in order to see pruning on his woodland and obtain from him figures which 
might be used to further our own work. He arranged an exhibit for Ashby and 
Acton fairs and set up a 4H exhibit at the Brockton Fair which consisted of a 
Christmas tree plantation, a panel from Washington, illustrating five rules for 
campers and all of the sample boards which had been made by the forestry clubs 
in Essex County, and set up a forestry exhibit in Newton. 

During December two saw mill meetings were held, one at H. E. Buck's mill in 
West Sterling and the other at Sherburne Brother mill in Tyngsboro. At each 
mill the extension forester had five small logs ranging from five to six inches in 
diameter, five medium logs, ranging from eight to ten, and five larger logs ranging 
from thirteen to eighteen inches in diameter, run through the saw. The time it 
took to saw each log was noted, although the five small logs were kept as one. The 
lumber was sealed by a representative mill-man and graded at the same time, so 
that the quality of lumber cut could be ascertained. By keeping track of the time 
it took to saw the logs and the quality of lumber and the money obtained for the 
same, we were able to get a result which showed very conclusively that it took 
three or four times as long to cut 1,000 feet of small logs as it would to cut a 
thousand feet of large logs and also that the amount of money obtained for the 
lumber cut was of insufficient amount to make it worth while for a man to cut 
small logs from his own woodlot and haul them to the mill. It was also shown 
that the mill men could not afford to cut the small 'logs. The quality, cubical con- 
tent and value of the lumber cut is increased three or four times if the tree is 
allowed to grow to double its size on the lot before cutting. Knowing this the 
owner of a woodlot must surely consider that cutting his stumpage on a rotation 
basis is the only proper way to handle it. 

The extension forestry project seems to have taken a good foothold and wood- 
land owners are beginning to feel that they have something which should be given 
more attention than it has been in the past. In the past the woodlots were con- 
sidered a mine which could be visited whenever the need for forest products 
arose, but no consideration was given to the future. They have been satisfied in 
the past to allow nature to give them whatever crop she desired, but they are now 
fully awake to the fact that they can improve the quality just the same as they 
can that of any other product which they are raising. This awakening of the 
owners of woodland to their prospective value, is one of the most promising fac- 
tors in our forestry work. 

State Forests. 

Our preliminary statement must be a repetition of that of the past three years. 
The department has been handicapped by the fact that owing to limited funds no 
fire protective or development work whatever was done on twenty-five out of 
forty-five state forests, and even among the remaining twenty several forests 
received very slight attention. We were fortunate in selling considerable timber, 
cordwood and other forest products. When the policy of purchasing state forests 
was first inaugurated, it was prophecied that because of the policy of purchasing 
cheap land, cut-over timber land and abandoned farms, no returns could be ex- 
pected for many years. There have, however, been sales of forest products of 
from five to ten thousand dollars every year. 



P.D. 73 16 

ishburnham Forest. In the spring there were planted 22,000 pines on the 
Willard Lot and during the fall 15,000 spruce on the Corey Lot. The summer 
months were spent largely in ribes eradication. It was a poor year for this sort 
of work as frequent rains interrupted it. The crew on this forest gathered about 
seven tons of moss which was sent to the forest nurseries, where it is used in 
packing stock for shipment. A fire caused by the railroad burned over about 
fifteen acres of land on the Crocker tract. 

Bash Bish Forest. The Taconic State Park Commission of New York, which 
controls the land on the New York side of the state line, has proceeded energct- 
icallv with improvements to their property, building parking spaces, picnic 
grounds, comfort stations and now have commenced to widen and grade the road 
from Copake Falls to the Massachusetts line. In view of the thousands of dollars 
which New York state is spending, it might seem that Massachusetts could spend 
a few hundred dollars in improvements around the falls, such as fireplaces, picnic 
tables and water supply. 

Beartown Forest. During the spring 39,000 spruce were set out on the Stevens 
Lot and during the fall considerable time was devoted to brushing out the 
boundarv lines. 

Bri infield Forest. About 95,000 trees (90,000 white and 5,000 red pine) were set 
on this forest. Owing to the fact that the land is well-stocked with sprout hard- 
woods, the pines were widely spaced and 150 acres of land covered. The main 
forest road through the Bramble Lot was cleared of brush. 

Erving Forest. During the winter the crew of two men carried on release cutting 
on about 100 acres of planted and natural pine land. The spring months were 
occupied chiefly in the nursery in digging, shipping and transplanting 100,000 
two year seedlings. During the season the crew assisted at several forest fires in 
the vicinity, the largest being in Wendell which burned over 100 acres or more of 
our state forest land in that town. Only 4,400 trees were set out in the forest, but 
during the summer repairs were made to the Laurel Lake road and a few miles of 
forest roads were brushed out. 

Foxborough Forest. Work on this forest was confined to planting 35,000 trees 
on the burned over area which was cleared the year before. 

Granville -Tolland Forest. We cleared out brush and inferior trees along both 
sides of the main road for about three miles of forest roads. We planted 25,000 
red pine in the spring and 15,000 white during the fall. Grey birch and other 
inferior hardwoods were cut on 10 acres of land which had been planted. Con- 
siderable work was done on the McGrannis house in interior repairs. 
Harold Parker Forest. Planting on this forest consisted in the use of 10,000 red 
pine and 10,000 white pine, mostly to fill in blanks in plantations established in 
previous years. Some two miles of forest road were made passable for autos by 
removal of rocks and filling in muddy spots with gravel and stones, and about 
fifty miles of fire lanes were mowed and the heavy brush burned. A serious prob- 
lem is presented on this forest by a heavy infestation of gypsy moths. Conditions 
were bad last summer and will be worse this coming one. Lightly infested areas 
should be creosoted during the winter and heavily infested colonies sprayed in 
June. Conditions are complicated by the fact that this forest has many interior 
parcels owned by non-residents who, of course, will do nothing to protect their 
property; hence it becomes necessary for the department to do moth work on this 
land for our own protection. 

Hubbardston Forest. In the fall the Otter River crew were transferred to the 
Hubbardston Forest where they planted 20,000 trees and released 20 acres of 
planted and young natural pine. 

Leominster Forest. Operations on this forest were confined to the planting of 
25,000 trees on a section from which cordwood had been taken under a previous 
cutting right. 

Marthas Vineyard Forest. Brush was cut, piled and burned on four miles of fire 
line and one mile was plowed. About two miles of forest roads were cleared of 
brush. During the spring planting season 75,000- four year white and 6,000 three 
year red pines were set out. Minor repairs were made to the house and a garage 
and woodshed constructed. 



14 



P.D. 73 



Mohawk Trail Forest. Five thousand Norway spruce and 1,000 red pine were 
planted and a release cutting was made on 20 acres of natural reproduction. 
About 60 cords of spool wood and a few thousand feet of hardwood logs were 
sold to a local operator. A garage was built at the Brown place to house the ear 
belonging to the patrolman. Brush was cut and burned on about two miles of 
forest road. Eighteen thousand seedlings were transplanted into the Totem nur- 
sery. There were 4,700 parties who spent the night at the camp ground on the 
state highway, and it is estimated that 10,000 persons stopped there for luncheon 
Monroe Forest. Work on this forest was confined to planting of 16,000 red pint 
and 1,000 spruce taken from the Totem Nursery on Mohawk Trail Forest. 
Mount Grace Forest. During the fall months the Erving crew worked on this 
forest clearing out trails and graveling the entrance road from Warwick Village. 
Myles Standish Forest. About two miles of new fire lines were cleared of brush, 
stumps and plowed; five or six miles of old fire lines re-mowed, and thirty-five 
harrowed. Planting work consisted of the setting of 170,000 white pine trans- 
plants in the Mast Road section. About 190,000 trees were shipped from the 
nursery and 120,000 set back in the nursery. A severe infestation of gypsy moths 
in the northwest part of the forest required attention and the woods were sprayed 
using a spraying outfit constructed by our own men. About two acres of pine 
plantation were pruned and branches burned. During the summer white pines 
infested with weevil were treated by cutting and burning infested tips. There 
were the usual repairs to the headquarters house and barn and telephone lines. 
Oakham Forest. The plantations on the French Lot were released by cutting out 
birch and scrub pine and the brush near the state highway burned. A fire burned 
over a portion of the Robertson and Larkin Lot, destroying about 30 acres of 
planted land set out 15 years ago. 

October Mountain Forest. Owing to the flood of November, 1927, the main road 
to the headquarters house was almost ruined, and two bridges completely washed 
away and others weakened. As a result a large share of the work done on this 
forest during the year was the repairing of this road and the replacing of the 
bridges. The town of Lee aided in this work by supplying a number of men and 
several teams and the town of Washington also gave some assistance. During the 
winter when road work was not practicable about 150,000 feet of hardwood logs 
were cut by our own men, and the logs sold to a local operator, to be sawed into 
ties and lumber, together with about 100 cords of fuel wood. An excellent profit 
resulted from this operation. Forest roads to the extent of 20 miles were cleared 
of brush and weeds. The only planting was the setting out of 5,000 trees used in 
filling in older plantations. 

Otter Hirer Forest. Releasing of plantation areas was carried on during the 
winter months. Spring and early summer was given over to work in the nursery 
and to field planting; 378,000 trees were taken out of the nursery, 150,000 red 
pine were put in, and 41,000 trees were planted in the area burned over tliree 
years ago. During the summer forest roads were brushed, the railroad fire lines 
plowed and a new and stronger bridge put across Otter River, giving access to 
the south side of the forest, which with the old bridge was always uncertain. 
Changes were made in the barn to house the fire truck which proved itself of 
great value at several fires during the spring. We continued the policy of allowing 
the poorer people of Baldwinville to cut trash wood under restrictions at the 
forest and during the past winter twenty-five persons cut about one hundred 
cords of wood which resulted in the releasing of 75 acres of pine plantations at 
no cost to the state. We wish that conditions were such that this sort of work 
could be performed in other forests. 

Oxford Forest. The boundary lines of the lot on which the fire tower stands were 
brushed out to a width of ten feet. 

Sandisfield Forest. The mature hardwood growth on the Tiffany Lot from which 
pine and hemlock had been culled before we purchased the lot, was sold to a local 
operator, who cut about 10,000 ties from the remains of the former operation. 
During the fall 15,000 Norway spruce were planted in an old field. 
Shawme Forest. Brush was cleared and burned on three miles of new fire lines, 
two miles of which was plowed and harrowed. Seven miles of old line was har- 



P.D. 73 



15 



rowed. The power company harrowed the four miles of transmission line which 
was cleared and plowed the previous year, cleared three miles of forest roads of 
brush and constructed two miles of new road leading to water holes for fire pro- 
tection. We planted 30,000 white, 30,000 red pine, and 10,000 spruce. One hun- 
dred acres of planted land was given a release cutting and the nursery was 
weeded and cared for. 

Savoy Mountain Forest. Repaired about four miles of forest road which, was 
badly washed by the flood of last fall, and cleared brush on fourteen miles of 
forest road ; also released 50 acres of forest plantation. A small amount of stand- 
ing cordwood was sold. Owing to a slump in the fern market no purchaser could 
be found for the fern rights on Savoy Mountain and Mohawk Trail forests. In 
co-operation with the Department of Agriculture who supplied a foreman, our 
crew carried on ribes eradication work in order to protect our pine plantations 
from blister rust. The crew covered about 1,000 acres, found twenty-one infected 
pines, and pulled 12,000 currant bushes. 

Spencer Forest. The department continued a system inaugurated the previous 
year, of allowing persons from Spencer to go in and to cut inferior hardwoods 
such as grey birch and soft maple, for which they paid stumpage fees at the rate 
of fifty cents to one dollar per cord. In this way we were enabled to get rid of 
undesirable growth, at the same time bringing in a little income from the forest. 
In the fall the area so cleared was planted by the use of 50,000 white pine and 
14,000 red pine. On the Chestnut Hill lot we continued the policy of thinning out 
the balsam fir plantation and selling the product as Christmas trees. Some 400 
trees were cut which brought in about $200. 

Swann Forest. The regular forest roads and trails were cleared of brush. All 
white pine plantations were treated for weevil. The headquarters house was 
painted and 3,000 spruce were planted in the field. 

Templet on Forest. Work on this forest was limited to the planting of 60,000 
four-year red pine transplants on what is called the Hadley Tract. 
Windsor Forest. Enlarged the parking space, and did some light thinning in the 
hemlock grove to improve the view of the gorge at Windsor Jams. Planted 70,000 
spruce and 5,000 white pine in old fields. 

Area of the State Forests, November 30, 1928. 
Name of Forest 
Arthur Warton Swann 
Ashburnham 
Barre . 
Bash Bish . 
Beartown 
Blandford . 
Brimfield 
Clarksburg . 
Colrain 
Conway 
Erving 
Foxborough 
Harold Parker 
Hawley 
Hubbardston 
Leominster 
Marthas Vineyard 
Mohawk Trail 
Monroe 
Mount Grace 
Mvles Standish 
Northfield . 

Total 



Acres 


Name of Forest 


Acres 


986.75 


Oakham 


800.55 


1,078.075 


October Mountain 


. 13,652.6 


349.125 


Otis . 


. 2,772.81 


390.08 


Otter River 


. 1,812.46 


7,399.93 


Oxford 


28.7 


1,734.8 


Peru .... 


. 1,588. 


910.14 


Petersham . 


248.15 


1,764. 


Pittsfield . 


. 1,155.84 


1,206.194 


Sandisfield . 


. 4,210.76 


1,563.12 


Savoy Mountain 


. 7,621.98 


4,431.565 


Shawme 


. *8,422.12 


662.2412 


Shutesbury 


638.36 


1,327.6 


Spencer 


650.525 


2,131. 


Sutton 


262.7715 


724.37 


Templeton . 


377.5 


1,636.2563 


Tolland-Granville 


. 4,682.25 


*4,472.75 


Warwick . 


960.45 


5,419.6 


Wendell 


. 4,667.46 


2,848.57 


Westminster 


335.12 


1,065.825 


Windsor 


. 1,450.05 


*8,869. 


Worthington 


225. 


235.4875 


Unassigned 


. 1,093.325 






108,863.2605 



Includes takings. 



16 



P.D. 73 



Report of the State Fire Warden 
Mr. William A. L. Bazelt, State Forester. 

Sir: — In compliance with the provisions of section 26, chapter 48 of the 
General Laws, I submit herewith a report of the work accomplished by this 
branch of the division during the year just ended. 

The year 1928 has been a favorable forest fire year and our wardens' reports 
show the least number of fires in many years. A large number of these fires, 
however, would have been very serious if we had not had an experienced body of 
men supplied with suitable equipment ready to give immediate assistance. 

The control of these fires is largely due to the extensive use of our small portable 
power pumps which are especially constructed for forest fire work. These pumps 
weigh but 300 pounds and can be carried very easily to any small stream or pond, 
placed in operation in a few minutes and are capable of forcing water through 
4,000 to 5,000 feet of one-inch hose and delivering a stream of water sufficient to 
extinguish a forest fire. The department now owns twenty-two of these pumps 
with a sufficient number of trucks for the transportation of them and other 
equipment. A large number of towns are providing their forest wardens with 
this type of equipment, thus showing an interest in reducing the fire losses in 
their towns. 

Three new forest fire trucks were purchased and equipped with power pumps 
and hose together with a supply of smaller equipment and were assigned to 
district forest wardens Albert R. Ordway, Westfield; Joseph L. Peabody, Win- 
chendon; and Charles L. Woodman, Douglas. Each outfit complete costs about 
$3,000 and is used exclusively for forest fire work. 

A new 68-ft. steel observation tower was erected on Prospect Mountain on 
the town line between Petersham and Phillipston. This station covers a large 
forested area including Harvard Forest and will be one of our most valuable 
towers. The towns of Athol, Barre, Dana, New Salem, Petersham, Phillipston 
and Templeton contributed $100 each toward the cost of this tower. About one 
mile of telephone line was run through the woods to give us a direct line into 
the Athol exchange. 

A new 68-ft. tower was also erected on the highest point in the Lynn Woods 
Reservation. This tower was purchased by the city of Lynn and we assisted in 
the construction of it with the understanding that it would be used by us during 
extremely dry periods as a sub-station. 

Our men have done a large amount of maintenance work such as replacing 
telephone lines, painting towers and cleaning out trails. 

A determined effort to stop the building of fires without first procuring a permit 
from the forest warden authorizing such fires was made with the result that over 
100 parties who violated the law have either paid the cost of extinguishment or 
have been taken into court and made to pay a substantial fine. These fines ranged 
from five to fifty dollars in each case. Under date of April 7 it was necessary to 
request all forest wardens to discontinue the issuance of permits excepting for 
use on rainy days. This request met with the approval of all forest wardens and 
a general reduction of forest fires was noted. 

Many of the towns throughout the eastern part of the State have adopted a 
forest fire patrol system by employing two or more patrolmen equipped with 
automobiles and fire fighting equipment to patrol various sections of the towns 
during Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and times of extreme drought. These patrol- 
men inspect public camping places, ponds and various points where people con- 
gregate and warn the public of the dangers of leaving campfires without being 
thoroughly extinguished and of dropping matches and cigarettes by the roadside. 
The reports received from these towns are very encouraging, many of them 
claiming that the patrol has lessened the number of fires in their towns and thereby 
reduced" the expense of extinguishing. 

The weather reports received through the United States Weather Bureau co- 
operating with the United States Forest Service have been received each morning 
by telephone at 10 A.M. These reports have given us very reliable information 
relative to wind velocity, humidity and general weather conditions twenty-four 
hours in advance. This has given us an opportunity to take advantage of bad fire 
conditions and plan our work accordingly. 



P.D. 73 17 

We held two forest fire conferences during the year, one in Barnstable County 
and one at Boston which included the counties of the eastern part of the state. 
These meetings were attended by forest wardens, deputies and selectmen and 
topics relating to forestry and forest fires were discussed with a great deal of 
interest. 

The annual meeting of our field men was held in Berkshire County on October 
16 and 17. Inspection trips were made to our various state forests in that vicinity 
and evening meetings were held in Pittsfield and North Adams. 

The Cape Cod forest fire prevention experiment, which was a three year experi- 
ment to determine the value of education and patrol in the prevention of forest 
fires, has been completed and the results are very satisfactory. A final report 
covering the entire three years has been published and copies of the same may be 
had upon request. 

Seven forest fire organizations are now in operation throughout eastern Massa- 
chusetts and three in Worcester county have been added this year. These various 
organizations are made up of wardens and their deputies together with people 
interested in forestry and fire prevention. Meetings are held monthly during the 
year and they are very instructive and interesting. The total membership in these 
organizations is approximately 700 and it is expected that at least three more 
organizations will be established this year. 

The State Police and Fish and Game wardens have again rendered very valuable 
assistance in the apprehension of parties burning brush without first procuring 
a permit and in assisting in the extinguishing of forest fires. This co-operation 
during our spring fire season when our men were extremely busy is much 
appreciated. 

The continued co-operation of the United States Forest Service has proved very 
satisfactory. Our Federal allotment has been increased slightly and the satisfac- 
tory way in which Mr. C. R. Tillotson, who has charge of the Federal work in 
the New England states, has handled the situation has been very pleasing. 

I desire to take this opportunity to express to my associates in this branch of 
the department and to all forest wardens and deputies my appreciation for their 
loyal support in this work. It is only through such co-operation that the best 
results can be accomplished. 

The following tables show the comparative damages, costs, etc. for the past 
three years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. C. Hutching 

StateiFire Warden. 

Forest Fires for the Past Three Years 

Average Average 

Number Acreage Cost to acreage damage 

Year of fires burned extinguish Damage per fire per fire 

1926 . 2,860 34,675 $61,030.00 $163,668.00 12.12 57.22 

1927 . 2,029 35,400 61,362.00 286,673.00 17.45 141.28 

1928 . 930 12,516 20,402.00 58,824.00 13.46 63.25 

Types of Classified Damages 

1927 1928 

Standing trees $183,203.00 $28,166.00 

Logs, lumber, cordwood 34,897.00 17,283.00 

Buildings 52,427.00 7,865.00 

Bridges, fences 1,114.00 2,553.00 

Sproutland 15,032.00 2,957.00 



Total 



$286,673.00 



$58,824.00 



18 



P.D. 73 



Types of Land Burned Over (Acres). 

1927 

Timber 3,818 

Second growth 6,325 

Second growth, not merchantable 6,207 

Brush land 15,032 

Grass land 4,018 

Total 35,400 12,516 

Forest Fires of 1928 

Cost to 

Months Number Acres extinguish Damage 
1927 

December 16 39 $ 80.00 — 

1928 

January . - 36 127 184.00 

February 16 31 113.00 

March 160 1,151 1,780.00 

April 393 3,820 6,960.00 

May 236 5,909 8,327.00 

June 12 1,112 2,194.00 

July 5 9 149.00 

August 8 205 198.00 

September 1 1 6.00 

October 17 34 143.00 

November 30 78 268.00 



Total 


930 


12,516 


$20,402.00 


$58,824.00 




Classified Causes of Forest Fires, 


1927 - 1928. 






1927 




1928 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Railroad 


. . . . 450 


22.18 


198 


21.29 


Lumbering 


. . . . 3 


.15 






Brush burning 


. . . . 315 


15.53 


111 


11.94 


Campers 


. . . . 4 


.20 


2 


.21 


Incendiary . 


. . . . 149 


7.34 


85 


9.14 


L'nknown 


. . . . 462 


22.77 


144 


15.48 


Miscellaneous 


. . . . 646 


31.83 


390 


41.94 



Total . . 




2,029 


100. 


)0 


930 


100.00 




Railroad Fires of 


1928. 










Number 


Number 










Mileage 


of loco- 


of 


Acreage 


Cost to 




Railroad 


of track 


motives 


fires 


burned 


extinguish 


Damage 


New York, New Hav 
& Hartford 


en 












. 1,931 


1,042 


107 


612 


$1,267.00 


$2,851.00 


Boston & Albany . 


969 


334 


21 


287 


319.00 


2,031.00 


Boston & Maine . 


. 1,936 


846 


68 


416 


666.00 


1,176.00 


Central Vermont 


73 


23 


2 


7 


24.00 


250.00 


Total . . . 


4,909 


2,245 


198 


1,322 


$2,276.00 


$6,308.00 



Report of the Superintendent of Moth Work. 
Hon. Wm. A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner. 

Sir: — In my reports to you of 1925, 1926 and 1927 I called attention to the 
critical state of the gypsy moth infestation in Massachusetts. It is almost impos- 
sible to predict exactly in what part of the state the infestation will be heaviest, 
and contrary to expectations the district of Cape Cod did not show the greatest 
amount of stripping in the summer. The central and northeastern parts of the 
state were badly infested, particularly Boxford, Georgetown, Rowley and New- 



P.D. 73 



19 



bury, in Essex County, Northborough and Westborough in Worcester County and 
Dunstable, Groton, Littleton and Marlborough in Middlesex County. The state 
as a whole, however, shows that conditions are worse than they have been for 
many years. 

In order to control the gypsy moth effectively, there must be perfect co-operation 
between the state and the town, and the law, to be enforced properly, must be 
made a popular one, that is, one that individuals, communities and state recognize 
as just and one, the enforcement of which is conducive to safety, protection of 
property and enhancement of values. This is the general condition which we aim 
to bring about if possible. 

To achieve this much desired state of affairs, this branch of the work of this 
division should have sufficient appropriations to be able to aid materially such 
towns as have a small liability not adequate for the amount of work to be done 
in the town. A town of this class, where only a small amount of money is 
appropriated, may adjoin one with a large liability. In order to protect the 
richer town, the state should assist by reimbursement the poorer town, so that 
equable conditions shall prevail. 

These are the ideal conditions and I should like to see these established as 
far as possible. 

During the spraying season last year the weather was very unfavorable. It 
rained practically every day, making it almost impossible to spray so that the 
poison would stay on the leaves. This, of course, added to the expense of spraying, 
causing considerable waste of both poison and labor. Consequently, later in the 
summer there was a heavy egg-laying, in all regions except the areas stripped. 
In these badly infested areas, the wilt disease disposes of large numbers of the 
insect, but there is always a migration of healthy ones to outside areas, where the 
egg-laying is sufficient to mean a large hatching in the spring. This, of course, 
is in the woodland where creosoting cannot be done, on account of the expense. 

Probably this coming year it will be necessary to assist certain towns in the 
western part of the state, whose liability is small, which are generally infested. 

The brown-tail moth situation remains about the same, the only really bad 
infestation being in Plum Island near Newburyport. 

Co-operative work has been carried on on the North Shore under a private fund 
deposited by Colonel William D. Sohier, Agent. A financial statement showing 
the transactions of this fund is given here. 

Financial Statement, 

November 30, 1928. 
North Shore Gypsy Moth Suppression Special Fund. 



Receipts 

Balance from 1927 $1,629.67 

1928 

Apr. 20 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 1,000.00 

Apr. 27 Department of Public Works .... 33.87 

Apr. 30 Interest on Bank Deposit 8.12 

May 18 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 2,000.00 

July 31 Department of Public Works .... 122.97 

Sept. 7 Superintendent of Buildings 5.03 

Sept. 21 Superintendent of Buildings 8.33 

Oct. 25 Wm. D. Sohier, Agent 857.27 

Oct. 31 Ernest Gruening 19.12 

Oct. 31 Interest on Bank Deposit 23.35 

$5,707.73 

Expenditures 

Pay roll $2,356.63 

Rent 315.00 

Travel and Teaming 43.08 

Supplies, etc 94.35 

2,809.06 



Balance carried to 1929 $2,898.67 



20 



P.D. 73 



A report of the United States Department of Agriculture in charge of the 
parasite work follows. 

Respectfully submitted, 
G. A. Smith, 

Superintendent of Moth Work. 
Federal Gypsy Moth AYork in Massachusetts. 
By A. F. Burgess. 

During the year 1928 the gypsy moth has continued to increase in Massachu- 
setts, the acreage defoliated being somewhat greater than that of the previous 
year. Large areas of woodland are now heavily infested in Worcester County 
and smaller areas of severe infestation occur as far west as Berkshire County. 
In the latter county where the field work is handled by the Federal Government 
as a part of the barrier zone project, the number of infestations found in the 
Fall of 1928 exceeded those of the previous year. As a result of the increase in 
infestation that has been reported west of the Connecticut River, 13 towns which 
were formerly classified as slightly infested, have been added to the generally 
infested area for the purpose of enforcing the gypsy moth quarantine. It is 
apparent that very strenuous work will be required to prevent the insect from 
increasing in the territory west of the Connecticut River to a point where heavy 
defoliation will result and conditions will become favorable for rapid spread. 

During the last few years parasitism has been very low and climatic conditions 
have not been favorable for reducing the abundance of this pest. A slight increase 
in parasitism has been noted during the past year but it does not seem to be 
sufficient to bring about a reduction of the insect. Importations of parasites from 
Europe have been continued and colonies have been liberated in sections that 
seemed to be most favorable for their increase and development. 

Quarantine and inspection work designed to prevent the spread of the insect 
from the territory where it now occurs has been continued during the past year 
and has safeguarded the uninfested portions of Massachusetts and other states 
from becoming infested with this insect. 

There has been no unusual increase of the brown-tail moth and although the 
winter webs are more abundant than usual in a limited number of localities, the 
insect can usually be satisfactorily controlled if the webs are destroyed during 
the winter. 

APPENDIX. 

Financial Statement 
Receipts and Expenditures for the Year Ending November 30, 1928. 



Purpose of Appropriation 


Amount 


1 

Refunds, 
etc. 


Expendi- 
tures 


Balance 
to 1929 


Balance 

to 

Treasury 


Salary of Commissioner 


$6,000.00 




$6.00(1.11(1 






Personal Services , . . . 


12,500.00 




12,470.00 




$30.00 


Expenses of Commissioner . 


260.00 




196.07 




53.93 


Office Incidentals .... 


4,000.00 




3,952.16 




47.84 


General Forestry and Nurseries 


12.500.00 


$23.53 


12.519.01 




4.52 


Purchase and Planting of 












Forest Lands .... 


5,000.00 




4.228.83 




771.17 


Prevention of Forest Fires . 


63,000.00 


807.50 


63.807.50 






Federal Forestry Fund . 


24.192.95 


599.83 


24,532.30 


$260.48 




Protection against Forest Fires 


2,000.00 




1,005.27 




994.73 


Reimbursement for Fighting 












Forest Fires .... 


2,500.00 




593.50 




1,906.5« 


SuDpression of Gypsy and 












Brown-Tail Moths . 


55,000.00 


2,654.60 


57,600.78 


53.82 




Maintenance of State Forests . 


25,000.00 


76.34 


25,071.43 




4.91 


Purchase and Development of 












State Forests .... 


100,000.00 


29.71 


98,315.39 


1,714.32 




Maintenance of Mount Grace . 


500.00 




497.90 




2.10 


Maintenance of Standish Monu- 












ment 


2,000.00 




1,982.76 




17.24 


Repair of Standish Monument . 




2,217.34 


51.10 


2.166.24 








to Mar. 21 






Prevention of Forest Fires in 










.30 


Barnstable County 


1,500.00 




1.499.70 




Construction of Road to Stan- 












dish Monument 




349.05 


40.00 


309.05to Mar. 31 


Comfort Station at Standish 










16.49 


Monument 


3,000.00 




2,983.51 




Patrol, Lower Cape 


1,350.00 




1,145. S7 




204.13 


Totals 


§320.292.95 


$6,757.90 


$318,493.08 


$4,503.91 


$4,053.86 



P.D. 73 21 

Receipts, 1928. 

For ferns sold $ 210.00 

" cord wood 1,250.06 

" hay and pasturage 100.00 

" blueberries and fruit 153.50 

" lumber, posts, etc 5,869.49 

" press brush and Christmas trees 463.41 

" rent and camp sites 1,593.00 

" sale of buildings, etc 25.00 

" miscellaneous 259.50 

" receipts at Standish monument 728.10 

" books, maps, etc. 42.50 

" redemption of lots 1,367.24 

" examinations 135.20 

" trees sold ( 15,998.80 

" highway work (use of sprayers) 400.00 

" supplies for gypsy moth work 277.25 

" contributions to fire towers 900.00 

" supplies for fire fighting . . 2.394.90 

" interest on bank deposits 82.12 



Total $32,250.07 



Statement of Expeditures and Receipts on State Forests for the 
Year Ending November 30. 1928. 



State Forest 


Planting 

and 
Nurseries 


General Up* 
keep,Fire 
Lines and 
Roads 


Surveying 
Titles 


Land 


Totals 


Receipts 


Arthur Warton Swann 


$33.76 


$1,713.55 


— 


— 


$1,747.31 


— 


Ashburnham 


537.15 


1.191.20 


— 


— 


1,728.35 


$207.40 


Barre .... 


— 


11.62 


$30S.91 


— 


320.53 


10.00 


Basil Bish 














Beat-town 


303.76 


67.50 


102.00 




473.26 


60.00 


Blandford 




83.5S 




— 


83.5S 




Tiri in fi <*1 rl 

X > I 1 1 li ill. 1 ' l • , . 


1 704.^5 


155 00 


240 35 




2 100 20 




Clarksburg 






609.24 




'609.24 




Colrain .... 




257.00 


102.30 




359.30 




Conway .... 




4.00 


233.38 




237.3S 




Erving 


1)46.15 


1,877.75 






2.823.90 


200.50 


Foxborough 


297.00 


92.44 






3S9.44 


42.00 


Harold Parker 


303.70 


2,714.34 






3,018.04 


19S.75 


Hawley .... 






41.35 




41.35 


25S.78 


Hubbardston 


164.70 


31.65 






196.35 




Leominster 


297.25 


16.00 


176.25 




489.50 


227.25 


Marthas Vineyard 


822.36 


5,143.58 


1.16 


$1,000.00 


6.967.10 




Mohawk" Trail 


194.00 


1,255.98 






1,449.98 


779.43 


Monroo 


93.03 


48.69 


559.46 




701. IS 


50.00 


Mount Grace 




541.65 






541.65 


328.96 


Ifyles Standish . 


1,967.17 


7,366.04 


25.20 




9,35S.41 


1,275.58 


Northfield 














Oakham 




213.39 


460.25 




673.64 


12.00 


October Mountain 


56.00 


10,800.:, 4 






10,856.54 


3,877.82 


Otis .... 






17S.00 




178.00 


50.00 


Otter River . 


2,H7.S5 


3,834.09 


65.30 




6.017.24 


123.26 


Oxford .... 
Peru 




91.72 






91.72 




Petersham 














Pittslield 














Sandistield 


301.65 




74.25 




375.90 


1,641.65 


Savoy Mountain . 




1.158.92 


3.50 




i.i •;•_>. 42 


69.60 


Shawme 


1,028.85 


5,691.31 


44.17 


103.27 


6,867.60 


34.25 


Shutesbory 












Spencer 


887.86 


236.72 


7.7.-) 




1,132.33 


237.02 


Sutton .... 














templeton 


638.30 


28.60 


442.94 




1,109.84 




Tolland-Granville 


246.40 


3,266.98 


104.00 




3,617.38 


125.00 


Warwick 




102.60 


641.36 




743.96 


15.00 


Wendell 




124.24 


1,822.89 




1.947.13 




Westminster 














Windsor 


411.50 


26.22 


296.50 




734.22 


99.71 


Worthington 






29.50 




29.50 




Totals 


$13,353.29 


$48,146.90 


$6,570.01 


$1,103.27 


$69,173.47 


$9,923 96 



22 P.D. 73 

The Distribution of Supplies. 

Supplies have been furnished to towns and cities for gypsy moth work as far 
as our limited appropriation warranted. 

The amounts given below do not correspond with the amount of aid given to 
the municipalities, as some towns make payment to the state for all or a part 
of the bill for supplies, according to the amount of their net expenditures and 
their class, under the provisions of section 4, chapter 132 of the General Laws. 

For amounts received from this office in reimbursement, and for expenditures, 
see table on page — . 

List of Towns and Amounts of Supplies Furnished for 1928. 

$293.32 
458.84 
367.56 
1,362.06 
253.80 
211.76 
215.29 
540.91 
580.69 
462.84 
192.09 
207.50 
439.59 
243.54 
100.48 
513.52 
186.00 
437.81 
272.58 



Ashbv 


. . $126.11 


Middleton 


Berkley 


. . 265.08 


North Reading 


Berlin 


245.13 


Norwell 


Bolton 


. . 482.09 


Pembroke 


Boxborough 


. . 384.58 


Plain ville 


Boxford 


. . 358.17 


Plympton 


Boylston 


. . 189.91 


Raynham . 


Brewster . 


. . 361.88 


Rowley 


Carlisle 


. . 425.96 


Sandwich . 


Dennis 


. . 400.25 


Sherborn . 


Dunstable 


. . 250.99 


Shirley 


Eastham . 


. . 142.27 


Sterling 


Freetown . 


. . 300.13 


Stow . . . 


Georgetown 


. . 650.51 


Sudbury . 


Halifax 


. . 395.66 


Truro 


Harwich . 


. . 623.88 


Tvngsboro 


Kingston . 


. . 357.24 


Wellfleet . . 


Lakeville . 


. . 548.94 


West Bridgewater 


Lunenburg 


. . 139.81 


West Newbury 


Lynnfield 


. . 328.88 




Mashpee . 


. . 385.59 


Total 



$14,703.24 

Purchases for other than town supplies made through storehouse: 

General Forestry and Nurseries $125.92 

Maintenance of State Forests 590.83 

Prevention of Forest Fires 680.44 

Prevention of Forest Fires in Barnstable County (>4.70 

Purchase and Development of State Forests 417.58 

Purchase and Planting of Forest Lands 25.07 

Fisheries and Game Division 20.75 

Nortli Shore Special Work 21.84 

Automobile repairs, etc. (Gypsy Moth) 574.74 

Miscellaneous 28.44 



Total $2,550.31 

Table Showing Expenditures and Reimbursements of Towns and Cities 

for the Year 1928. 









1928 








1929 














Total 






Required 






Reim- 




Amount 


Required 


Cities and 


Expendi- 


Total Net 


Private 


burse- 


Tools 


Received 


Expendi- 


Towns 


ture 


ture 


Work 


ment 


Supplied 


from 


ture 














State 




Abington . 


$2,681.55 












$2,727.28 


Acton 


1,269.39 












1.607.16 


Acushnet . 


1,849.38 












1.875.48 


Adams 


5,000.00 












s.ooo.ofr. 


Agawam . 


3,421.15 












3,881.08 


Alford 


138.59 












137.05 



P.D. 73 



23 



Cities am 
Towns 



Amesbury . 

Amherst 

Andover 

Arlington 

Ashbnrnham 

Ashby 



Ashheld 
Ashland 
Athol . 
Attleboro 
Auburn 
Avon . 
Ayer 
Barnstable 
Barre 
Becket 
Bedford 
Belehertown 
Bellingham 
Belmont . 
Berkley 
Berlin' 

Bernardston 
Beverlv 
Billeriea 
Blackstone 
Blanford 
Bolton 

Boston 
Bourne 
Boxborough, 
Boxford 
Boylston 

Braintree 
Brewster 
Briderewater 
Bri infield 
Brockton 
Brookfield 
Brookline 
Buckland 
Burlington 
Cambridge 
Canton 
Carlisle 
Ca rver 
Charlemont 
Charlton 
Chatham 
Chelmsford 
Chelsea 
Cheshire 
Chester 
Chesterfield 
Chicopee 
Chilmark 
Clarksburg 
Clinton 
Cohasset 
Colrain 
Concord 
Conway 
Cummington 
Dalton 
Dana . 
Dan vers 
Dartmouth 



Required 
Expendi 
ture 



5.000.00 
4.262.74 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
842.02 
556.30 

583.00 
1.274.59 
5.000.00 
5,000.00 
1,942.35 
r,039.48 
1,570.76 
5,000.00 
2,438.27 

448.. _ 
1,249.82 

884.8 
1,065.49 
5,000.00* 

397.43 

431.37 

405.66 
5,000.00 
4,083.2] 
1,270.90 

520.09 
$418.54 

5.000.00 
3,900.66 
145.00 
458.91 
341.05 

5,000.00 
655.3S 
3,186.79 
606.48 
5,000.00 
693.70 
5,000.00 
1,333.28 
754.54 
5,000.00 
3,941.46 
270.00 
1,291.63 
476.76 
1,012.88 
1,865.34 
4,394.04 
5,000.00 
677.02 
695.59 
231.79 
5,000.00 
210.37 
587.44 
5,000.00 
3,835.91 
999.85 
3,783.74 
448.08 
248.34 
3,387.57 
361.68 
5,000.00 
4,856.57 



Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 



1928 



Private 
Work 



$553.87 



719.25 
431.37 
►33.81 



$430.92 



145.00 
1,456.76 
540.88 



953.50 



824.99 



565.50 
•122.30 



Reim- 
burse- 
ment 



Tools 
Supplied 



112.50 
91.05 



$205.24 
•161.75 



•331.20 
532.01 
280.25 
•59.78 

639.16 



$126.11 



Total 
Amount 
Received 
from 
State 



$123.68 



319.30 



622.40 
199.50 



200.00 



554.99 



265.08 
245.13 



$482.09 



384.58 
358.17 
189.91 



361.88 



425.96 



584.38 
245.13 



$482.09 



384.58 
980.57 
389.41 



561.88 



980.95 



1929 



Required 
Expendi- 
ture 



5,000.00 
4,128.02 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
792.56 
420.11 

598.99 
1,096.15 
5.000.00 
5.0i ii 1.00 
2.21)7.30 

956.63 
1,639.51 
5.000.00 
1,846.45 

338.53 
1,155.09 

814.75 
1,187.06 
5,000.00 

404.96 

445.04 

409.27 
5.000.00 
4,655.87 
1.259.12 

484.11 
$532.58 

5.000.00 
3.763.10 
154.67 
545.17 
381.41 

5,000.00 
781.97 

2.757.06 
613.78 

5,000.00 
627.16 

5,000.00 

1,398.01 
986.14 

5.000.00 

4.077.27 
311.79 

1.274.51 
524.11 
!» 15.67 

2.133.66 

4.088.15 

5,000.00 
748.70 
688.20 
241.12 

5.000.00 
24:;. 24 
424.21 
5.000.00 

4,242.80 
768.84 
3.699.60 
452.89 
242.71 
3.109.10 
334.57 
5.000.00 
5,000.00 



• Lead sold 



24 



P.D. 73 









192S 








1929 














Total 






Required 


Total Net 




Reim- 




Amount 


Required 


Cities and 


Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Private 


burse- 


Tools 


Received 


Expendi- 


Towns 


ture 


ture 


Work 


ment 


Supplied 


from 


ture 














State 




Dec! ham 


5.000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000.00 


Deerfield . 


2,267.38 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2.226.47 


Dennis 


890.44 


1,040.04 


334.56 


149.60 


400.25 


549.85 


1,327.14 








•69.12 










Dighton 


1,959.46 


— 


— 


— 




— 


2,125.50 


Douglas 


997.02 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


894.08 


Dover . 


1.491.97 


— 


— 


— 




— 


1.480.10 


Draeut 


2.427.04 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2.279.42 


Dudley 


2.827.39 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2.14.;. 91 


Dunstable 


279.94 


481.37 


196.01 


201.43 


250.99 


47.2.42 


200.64 








•104. SS 










Duxbury . 


2,202.50 


— 


— 


— 




— 


2,593.69 


E. Bridge water 


2,227.03 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,277.23 


East P.rookfield 


503.08 


— 


— 


— 


: — 


— 


492.45 


E. Longmeadow 


1.427.42 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1.541.60 


Eastham . 


376.42 


475.54 


220.38 


99.00 


142.27 


241.27 


455.57 


Easthampton . 


5.000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5.000.00 


Easton 


3,056.34 


— 


— 


— 




— 


2.733.18 


Edgartown 


1.223.10 


— 


— 


— 




— 


1,654.26 


Egremont . 


391.66 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


414. til 


Enfield 


347.74 


— 


— 


— 


• 


— 


321.57 


Erving 


1,689.07 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1.286.01 


Essex . 


632.14 


— 


— 


— 




— 


662.12 


Everett 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5.000.00 


Fairhaven 


5.000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5.000.00 


Fall River 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000.00 


Falmouth . 


5,000.00 


— 


— 




— 


— 


5.000.00 


Fitchburg . 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5.000.00 


Florida 


$669.98 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


$685.41 


Foxborough 


2,002.80 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2.442.35 


Framingham . 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000.00 


Franklin . 


4.184.71) 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,995.25 


Freetown . 


902.21 


904.01 


357.75 


— 


300.13 


300.13 


884.69 


Gay Head . 


40.30 


— 


— 


— 


— 


.—4 A 


50.42 


Gardner 


5,000.00 


— 


— 




— 


— 


5,000.00 


Georgetown 


873.57 


1.153.17 


963.50 


244.00 


650.51 


894.51 


849.58 


Gill . 


403.92 


— 


— 


— 




— 


402.69 


Gloucester 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000.00 


Goshen 


169.27 


— 


— 




— 


— 


183.41 


Gosnold 


513.31 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


552.98 


Grafton 


3,208.53 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,503.00 


Gran by 


486.00 




— 


— 


— 


— 


487.13 


Granville . 


339.73 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


326.74 


Gt. Barrington 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4.832.02 


Greenfield 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000.00 


Greenwich 


281.82 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


255.94 


Groton 


1,779.15 


— 


— 




— 


— 


2.0(H). 80 


Groveland 


798.44 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


849.39 


Hadlev 


1,737.89 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,399.85 


Halifax . 


586.85 


786.53 


465.91 


199.68 


395.66 


595.34 


620.58 








•107.84 










Hamilton . 


2,183.02 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,380.85 


Hampden . 


272.13 


— 


— 


— 


' — 


— 


273.15 


Hancock . 


276.08 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


257.35 


Hanover . 


1,467.79 




— 


— 


— 


— 


1,479.01 


Hanson 


1,116.18 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,042.31 


Hardwick . 


2,351.58 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1.846.43 


Harvard . 


927.84 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,111.37 


Harwich . 


1,400.07 


1,361.47 


1,068.76 


— 


623.88 


585.28 


2,126.37 








•68.16 










Hatfield . 


1,858.07 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1.384.58 


Haverhill . 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,000.00 


Hawlev 


124.31 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


124.41 


Heath 


201.05 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


200.75 


Hingham . 


5,000.00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5.000.00 


Hinsdale . 


458.38 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


451.65 


Holbrook . 


1,436.43 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1.529.81 


Holden 


1.356.24 












1.561.00 


Holland 


108.37 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


102.70 


Holliston . 


1.578.96 












1.553.51 


Holyoke 


5,000.00 












5,000.00 



•Lead sold 



P.D. 73 



25 



Cities and 
Towns 



Hopedale . 
Hopkinton 
Hubbardston 
Hudson 
Hull . 
Huntington 
Ipswich 
Kingston . 
Lakeville . 

Lancaster 
Lanesborough 
Lawrence . 
Lee 

Leicester . 

Lenox 

Leominster 

Leverett . 

Lexington . 

Leyden 

Lincoln 

Littleton . 

Longineadow 

Lowell 

Ludlow 

Lunenburg 

Lynn . 

Lynnneld . 

Maiden 

Manchester 

Mansfield . 

Marblehead 

Marion 

Marlborough 

Marsh field 

Mashpee . 

Mattapoisett 
Mayuard . 
Medtield . 
Med ford . 
Medway 
Melrose 
Mendon 
Merrimac . 
Methuen . 
Middleborough 
Middlefield 
Middleton 

Milford . 
Millbury . 
Millis * . 
Millville . 
Milton 
Monroe 
Monson 
Montague . 
Monterey . 
Montgomery . 
Mt. Washington 
Nahant 
Nantucket 
Natick 
Needham . 
New Ashford 
New Bedford . 
New Braintree 
New Marlb'ugh 
New Salem 
Newbury . 



Required 
Expend! 
ture 



3,552.96 
1,205.67 

551.4 
3,702.91 
5,000.00 

702.89 
3.S99.0 
1,226.31 

700.31 

1,530.56 
r,!t:;.i >4 
5,000.00 
2.739.24 
2.126.21 
:;.17<'.:;7 
5,000.00 
247.02 

5,000.00 
146.29 
1,410.60 
853.37 
3.264.26 
5.000.00 
4.432.0. 

825.72 
5,000.00 
1,162.73 
5.000.00 
5,000.00 
4,542.6 
5,000.00 
1,940.36 
$5,000.00 
2,068.19 
309.42 

1.326.19 
4.23i (.12 
1.2S2.7 
5,000.00 
1.47S.11 
5,000.00 
502.73 
1.014.54 
5,000.00 
4.318.00 
145.10 
681.49 

5,000.00 
3,086.71 
1,438.02 
1,035.71 
5,000.00 
419.10 
1.600.76 
5,000.00 
321.92 
1U7.27 
90.96 
2.354.33 
3,862.23 
5,000.00 
5. odd. Oi) 
60.61 
5,000.00 
265.92 
711.54 
340.11 
1.191.92 



Total N 
Expend 
ture 



1,299 
850.80 



1,367.12 
1.331.66 



768.61 



1,033.29 



1928 



Private 
Work 



Reim- 
burse- 
ment 



Tools 
Supplied 



260 
•68.16 



910.06 
42" 



1,036.20 
♦30.00 



71.00 
'40.S8 



150.06 



300.75 
168.93 



306.56 



357.24 
548.94 



Total 
Amount 
Received 
from 
State 



1929 



Required 
Expendi- 
ture 



357.24 
699.00 



139.81 
328.88 



385.59 



250.00 



440.56 
497.81 



692.15 



293.32 



543.32 



Lead sold 



26 



P.D. 73 



1928 















Total 




Required 


Total Net 




Reim- 




Amount 


Cities and 


Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Pri vate 


burse- 


Tools 


Received 


Towns 


ture 


ture 


Work 


ment 


Supplied 


from 
State 


XT V. 

Newbury port 


k (too on 

U.IMM P.I M » 












Newton . . 


n nnn nn 

O.UUM.I Ml 












Norfolk . 


829 40 












North Adams . 


— nnn (\(\ 




~ 








North Andover 


4,760.1)4 












N. A 1 1 lcborough 


!T Aft/1 f\t\ 
.,lilili(MI 












> . lirooKneld . 


l ,510.50 












Ho. Rending . 


826.46 


808.99 


600.00 




458.84 


441.37 


Northampton . 


5,000.00 






— 






Northborough . 


SOo.OO 












Northbridge . 


D,UIM P.I M P 












.\ orr n nciu . 


1 111 QU 
1.111 .OO 












Norton . . 


1 401 97 












Norwell 


810 0!) 


(|')7 07 
• to I ,£ I 


(|-(| oo 

if i if.o* 
■ iii in 

t 1 S 1 II 1 




oo t ,.»o 


Oil 1 .«>0 


Norwooo . 


K OOO nil 












' 'a K rSIUIT s 


1 7CO J1 












Oakham . . 


1117 7n 












Orange/ . . 


3,127.79 












Orleans 


1 .572. 1 3 












*711S . . . 














i 'XI orii . • 


1 , 1 ^.i.O-4 












Palmer . . 


O.'MMI.IMI 












Paxon , . 


421.16 












Pea body . • 


~. Illlll III 1 












Pel ham . . 


291 .95 












Pembroke . . 


i ,i >o?v.>;i 


1 nor i o 


J ,04o.oo 


ooo oo 

JIMP. UU 


i ono on 


1 raq nn 
1 ,0o St.VO 


I'epperell . . 


1 7BQ IK 












Peru 














Pet'Tsham . 














Phillipston 


203.40 


523.20 


127.20 


148.00 


— 


148.00 


Pitt** field 


T v t ww i i in 












Plainfield . ■ 


i b n • ■ i 
















t Elm beetle work 






l lainviiie . 


tcir 1 1 


$1,048.42 


$146.50 


$210.00 


lor.o on 


»irj on 


Plymouth . . 


,,,,,, , ,. i 
• >,IM M I.I M I 












Ply m p ton . 1 . 


oo 


620.34 


166.15 
•5.25 


258.00 


Jl 1. 1 o 


rtOo. i O 


Prescott 


1 .il .'».) 












Princeton . 














Provincetown . 


J.t Mi i .1 1 1 












Qninoy 


^ flfWk iwi 












Randolph . 


1,860.01 












Raynham . 


Q ?to 07 


904.23 


188.35 




o 1 k on 


oi r. on 


Reading . . 


k i i ii i 

o ,i pi pi p.i n i 










1 


Kenonotn . 


nun. 27 












Revere 


5.000.00 








. — 


— 


Richmond ■ 


381.30 












Rochester 


640.19 












Rockland . 


O Q7H nn 












Rockport . 


O OCO no 












Rowe . 


1 75.50 












Rowley 




586.02 


413.93 
•302.65 




540.91 


r. A(\ On 

;i4U.uu 


Royalston 


645.44 








— 


— 


Kussen 


2,533.48 












Rutland 


054.57 












Salem 


!*r / w i r\ nn 












Salisbury . 


1 .11111 












8anuisneici . 


300.59 








~ 




8anowicn . 


1. 088.00 


1,157.50 


8 5.50 
•102.60 




580.69 


580.69 


saugus 


4,o I 2.32 












Savoy 


131.07 








— 


— 


Scituate . 


4,401.05 












Seekonk 


1,775.15 












Sharon 


2.222.03 












Sheffield . 


♦ 564.61 












Shelburne 


1.338.08 












Sherborn . 


729.26 


716.96 


385.69 




462.84 


450.54 



'Lead sold 



27 



Cities and 
Towns 



Shirley 

Shrewsbury 

Shutesbury 

Somerset . 

Soraervllle 

South Had ley 

Southampton 

Southborough 

Southbridge 

Southwick 

Spencer 

Springfield 

Sterling . 

Stockbrldge 

Stoneham . 

Stoughton 

Stow . 

Sturbridge 
Sudbury . 

Sunderland 

Sutton 

Swampscott 

Swansea . 

Taunton . 

Templeton 

Tewksbury 

Tisbury 

Tolland 

Topsfleld . 

Townsend 

Truro 

Tyngsborough 

Tyringham 
; Upton 
Ux bridge . 
Wakefield . 
Wales 
Walpole . 
Waltham . 
Ware . 
Wareham . 
Warren 
Warwick . 
Washington 
Watertown 
Wayland . 
Webster . 
Wellesley . 
Well fleet 

Wendell . 
^Venham . 
West Boylston 
W. Bridgewater 

W. Brookfleld . 
'Vest Newbury 

W. Springfield 
fV. Stockbridge 

Vest Tisbury 

Vestborough 

Vestfield . 

Vestford 

Ve8thampton 

Westminster 

» r eston 



Required 
Expendi- 
ture 



1,244.44 

2,509.55 

193.56 
2,035.39 
5,000.00 
3,362.54 

403.02 
1,507.66 
5,000.00 

927.80 
2,148.01 
5,000.00 

712.88 
2,514.39 
4,372.54 
3,469.49 

834.30 

721.72 
983.40 

644.64 
1,058.32 
5,000.00 
1,513.48 
5.000.00 
1,903.53 
1,480.27 
1.824.75 

191.47 
1,279.56 
1,121.61 
$410.28 

567.81 

223.24 
669.88 
3,965.12 
5,000.00 
227.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
4. 741. r,7 
4.904.70 
2.640.13 
263.43 
116.88 
5,000.00 
1,958.77 
5.000.00 
5,000.00 
505.77 

512.14 
1,364.56 

685.16 
1,140.72 

681.92 
485.02 

5,000.00 
594.07 
366.92 
1,762.81 
5,000.00 
2,442.46 
172.93 
584.29 
3,494.66 



Total Net 
Expendi- 
ture 



1,275.75 



1928 



Private 
Work 



58.00 
'71.00 



706.63 



1,006.28 



1,024.87 



$420.28 
816.07 



6.8' 



111.06 
»288.72 



46.28 
'166.32 



Reim- 
burse- 
ment 



Tools 
Supplied 



192.09 



$80.50 
191.00 
•80.00 



171.98 



207.50 

439.59 
243.54 



Total 
Amount 
Received 
from 
State 



192.09 



195.75 



$100.48 
513.52 



201.2.1 



611.57 



243.54 



$100.48 
709.27 



682.50 



1,523.72 



612.34 



203.45 
*3.74 



819.90 
•85.00 



143.60 
•92.95 



175.60 



127.30 



186.00 

437.81 
272.58 



361.60 



437.81 



399.88 



1929 



Required 
Expendi- 
ture 



1,005.40 

3,226.47 

215.33 
4,860.84 
5,000.00 
3,187.89 

390.91 
1,598.69 
5.000.00 

830.81 
1.962.35 
5.000.00 

720.70 
2.367.73 
5,000.00 
3,900.03 

736.94 

588.74 
1,081.94 

647.87 

808.23 
5,000.00 
1,827.38 
5,000.00 
1,575.28 
1,379.48 
2,381.81 

162.04 
1,247.66 
1.029.63 
$462.26 

556.S6 

223.61 
646.29 
3,617.09 
5.000.00 
208.43 
5.000.00 
5,000.00 
3,465.50 
5,000.00 
2.110.79 
231.62 
114.39 
5,000.00 
2,134.68 
5.000.00 
5,000.00 
605.03 

470.54 
1,363.76 

785.07 
1,326.78 

691.67 
516.40 

5,000.00 
582.09 
378.46 
1,892.55 
5.000.00 
2,071.03 
170.78 
635.99 
3,656.38 



• Lead sold 



28 



P.D. 73 









1928 








1929 




- 










Total 






Required 


Total Net 




Reim- 




Amount 


Required 


t\ asi n n c\ 


Aid 2\.jJKTLL 


XU A. fvJ JUL U 1" 






Tools 


J-VC^Cl V Cvl 




Towns 


ture 


ture 


Work 


ment 


Supplied 


from 


ture 












State 




VV estport . 


O T1 O *JO 












2, < 0o.41 


Westwood 


1,671.13 
Ann aa 












1,716.81 

PC AAA AA 


Weymouth 








■ 




Whateley . 


<?QO OA 












COO Qt 


Whitman . 


o Ton TO 

d,7zy. <o 




— 






- — 


O TQfJ A Q 

6, t ob.4o 


Wilbraham 


1 a t £5 DO 

l,blb.oo 












1,538.26 


Williamsburg . 


841.61 












776.31 


Williamstown . 


o i oo nt? 

3,lzb.9b 




— 


— 




■ 


3,157. 37 


Wilmington 


1,277.65 


* 








■ 


1 flAO AO 


Winchendon 


3,295.34 












O C 111 A1 


Winchester . 


o,uuu.uu 












PC AAA AA 


Windsor . . 


OAO £»A 


— 


— 


— 






205.89 


Winthrop . 


PC AAA AA 












PC AAA AA 


Wo burn 


5,000.00 












«r AAA AA 


Worcester . . 


5,000.00 












5,000.00 


Worthington . 


268.48 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


283.36 


W t*p ti t Yi s\ m 


1 276.22 












1 420 40 


Yarmouth 


l!29l!56 












l!857!84 



Public Document 



No. 73 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

Commissioner of Conservation 

AND 

State Forester 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1929 
J^W^,; DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 



Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on 
Administration and Finance 



AT 



15uo-5-'30. No. 8791. 



STATE LIBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

JUN 25 mo 

°mm. p« eport 

This report is divided for convenience and economy into four parts: — 

Part I. The organization and general work of the Department of C 
servation. 

Part II. The work of the Division of Forestry. 

Part III. The work of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Part IV. The work of the Division of Animal Industry. 

Parts I and II are printed in one volume as Public Document No. 73. 

Part III is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 25. 

Part IV is printed in a separate volume as Public Document No. 98. 



Part I. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CONSERVATION 

The annual report of the Department of Conservation is herewith submitted. 
During the past year meetings of the Commissioner and Directors have been 
held, and records of these meetings are on file in the office. 

On April 6 the Daughters of the American Revolution presented to the 
Commonwealth through this Department a new state forest to be called by 
their name. This was accepted by the Commissioner with appropriate cere- 
monies. It is located in Goshen and is an attractive piece of land and is 
marked with a commemorative bronze tablet. 



The work of encouraging forest conservation has been prosecuted vigorously. 
We have given advice to forest owners, sold trees for planting on waste lands 
at moderate cost, lectured on this subject, attended many meetings concerned 
in this matter, and done all that we could to encourage and foster forest con- 
servation. Our foresters have been busy in this work and our extension for- 
ester, co-operating with the Federal Government has worked largely with the 
farmers, helping to put their woodland property on a paying basis. 

Details of this work will be found in the report of the Division of Forestry. 



Throughout the year's work the Division of Fisheries and Game has held 
closely to the objectives outlined in the report of last year. Steady though slow 
progress has been made in rounding out the game farms and fish hatcheries 
and our one pond cultural unit. The brood stocks did not exceed those of 
previous years. The output of trout, six inches and upwards in size, greatly 
exceeded all previous records. The total number of pond fish distributed from 
the pond cultural unit was greatly in excess of any previous output. The out- 
put of pheasants from the game farms, considering the number and age of the 
birds, was the largest in the history of this country. Some progress has been 
made in the breeding of our native bob-white quail so that some distribution 
of adult birds can be made next spring, with a larger brood stock on hand 
than for years. 

The general efficiency and esprit de corps of the warden force continues to 
improve. During the year 1,761 cases were prosecuted in comparison to 1,271 
in 1928, which in that year constituted a record. 

Substantial progress was made in bringing many privately owned waters 
into the list of stocked waters for the fishing of which a sporting license must 
be purchased by the general public. 

As the result of a greater interest by the public in outdoor sports, together 
with increased law enforcement and the extension of the water areas for which 
licenses are required, the revenues from sporting licenses, fines resulting from 
the activities of the inland warden force and miscellaneous income amounted 
to $282,387.62, which is the largest ever received from these sources. The 
total revenue from all sources was $291,127.32, which is a record. 

The outstanding development of the year in the Division was the establish- 
ment of the position of State Supervisor of Marine Fisheries, and the nomina- 
tion to this position by His Excellency the Governor of Zenas A. Howes on 
October 9, confirmed on the 16th. Chapter 372 of the Acts of 1929 empowers 
the Supervisor to carry on the marine fisheries activities of the Division under 
the Director. It is a great satisfaction to report this recognition by the gov- 
ernment of one of the oldest industries of the State. Other industries may come 
and go but the fishing industry will be with us always by reason of our prox- 
imity to the sea. Whether the industry will continue to thrive will depend on 
those identified with it and the assistance rendered by the government. 



Forest Conservation 



The Conservation of Wild Life 



* P.D. 73 

Conservation of the Health of Domestic Animals 

The Division of Animal Industry has charge of the control, prevention and 
suppression of contagious diseases in domestic animals. 

During the last year there were 3389 persons reported as having been bitten! 
by dogs. There were 618 positive cases of rabies for the year which is 244 les* 
than last year. This decrease in rabid dogs is conclusive evidence that the 
local authorities are requiring a better enforcement of the dog laws. 

There were over one hundred thousand treatments administered this year 
in the prevention of hog cholera and during the year there have been no serious 
outbreaks to cause any great financial loss. 

Conditions in the Brighton market have been improved and buyers of dairy 
cows from that market can be reasonably sure of getting clean cows if they so 
desire. Interest in the tuberculin test has been manifest all over the State 
and we have at the present time Barnstable County as a modified accredited 
area and upwards of thirty towns outside that district which average between 1 
80 and 90% under supervision. There were 92,772 tuberculin tests applied! 
during the past year or more than twice as many as the year preceding. 

Forest Fires 

The season of 1929 was an unusually bad one for forest fires. A long sum- 
mer drought lasting into the autumn produced many fires, but with our im- 
proved equipment these fires were easily controlled in most cases. It was 
feared that we might have to resort to closing the hunting season which we 
are always loth to do, but splendid co-operation on the part of sportsmen 
made this unnecessary. We wish here to acknowledge the very good assistance 
rendered by the State Police, and Fish and Game Wardens. 

Standish Monument Reservation 

During the summer of 1929, 102,360 persons visited the reservation A We 
educational touring party from schools and colleges of the western states was 
among this number. This total would have been much larger but the monu- 
ment was closed for about twenty-five days while repairs were being made and 
the lower section of the statue removed from the top of the tower The season 
was also nearly three weeks shorter than usual. 

No provision was made by the legislature for completing the statue, and the 
lower half is now stored, pending future action. 

State Forests 

In the year 1929 only a comparatively small amount of land was added to 
our state forests Towards the end of the year, many lots advantageous to 
the department to purchase, were contracted for, but the purchases were not 
•jonsummated before the end of the fiscal year. 

The land purchased was distributed as follows: 
Name of Forest 

Erving 
Hawley 



Leominster 
Marthas Vineya 
Monroe 
Otter River 
Shawme 
Warwick 
Wendell . 
Westminster 



Acres 

5. 
189.7 
210. 
319.36 
1091. 
4.375 
12.45 
53. 
40. 
7.33 



Total for year J^H 

Recommendations 

Recommendations for legislation regarding the Division of Fisheries an<1 
Game will be found in the annual report of the Division of Fisheries and 



PJ) 



73 ft 

Part II 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

The work of the Forestry Division of the Department has been prosecuted 
in all its branches, general forestry, nursery work, educational work, propa- 
ganda, tree planting, prevention of forest fires, suppression of the gypsy moth 
and the brown-tail moth, and the forest extension work. Exhibits have been 
set up for the information of the public, and at the Centennial Exhibition of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society in. March, 1929, our exhibit was 
awarded the North Shore Garden Club's prize for the best educational ex- 
hibit. This award was a silver jug and salver of the value of one hundred 
dollars A photograph of this prize hangs in the Commissioner's office at the 
State House. 

The annual meeting of our entire field force was held at Gardner, Novem- 
ber 6 and 7. During the afternoon of the sixth the men visited Wachusett 
Mountain Reservation and the state-owned lands in Winchendon and Ashburn- 
ham, and during the evening a meeting was held at Gardner. The following 
forenoon was spent in going over the Yale Forest School property at Keene 
N ' - H - Th f e stings are instructive and give the men an opportunity to 
study forestry conditions in various parts of the State. 

Organization 

William A. L. Bazeley, Commissioner and State Forester 
Charles 0. Bailey, Secretary to the Department 
Elizabeth Hubbard, Head Clerk 
Harold 0. Cook, Chief Forester 

D. C. A. Galarneau, Forester in Western Massachusetts 
Frank L. Haynes, Forester, Land Purchase and Surveys 
Tames Morris, Nurseries 

Robert B Parmenter, Forester, Extension work and Reforestation 
Maxwell C. Hutchins, State Fire Warden 
George A. Smith, Chief Moth Suppressor 
John P. Crowe, Supervising Fire Warden 

District Fire Wardens District Moth Suppressors 

* n° We ^ S \ ndwich 1- Walter F. Holmes, Buzzards Bay 
| !ftW'{f^. 2 - Clarence W. Parkhurst, Wrentham 
i W, F M n i ' ™\ RlYeT 3 ' Michael H ' Don <> van > Beverly 

' tenWP ° l0 ^ W0b o ur ji 4 - John J. Fitzgerald, Haverhill 

R Frederick R. Stone, Sudbury 5. Charles E. Mace, Bolton 

5. Joseph L. Peabody, Winchendon 6. Harry B. Ramsev, Worcester 

[' \^ r ^^-^ odm ^^^g 7. Grover C. Twiss; Holvoke 

% Albert R. Ordway, Westfield 

ft Verne J. Fitzroy, Shelburne Falls 

Lectures 

I W * h&Ye , h u ad occasion during the past year to speak before women's clubs, 
imoheon clubs, men's clubs and similar organizations to the number of 66 
lms does not include 26 lectures given by the Extension Forester of the de- 
partment which are listed in his report. 

* D ^ rin /n the . year re P™sentatives of this department have attended meetings 

* the following organizations outside of Massachusetts: American Fish and 
xame Association, New York City; Society of American Foresters, New York 
Kty; New England Forestry Congress Hartford, Conn., and Society for the 

rotection of New Hampshire Forests at Hanover, N. H. 

Examinations 

JtZnt'' ^nations of private lands is not as fjreat as that of 
Tlr™ f u .^ n ,?P t° the average. The table below, however, does not 

1 J aT l hSt l d m * the report of the extensio " '""ate' which are 
he same thing: that the other foresters in the department designate as voodlot 



6 P 

examinations. The extension forester uses the term "farm visits" tx 
that is the expression used by other agricultural extension workers fo 
kind of work. 



Problem 
Improvement Cuttings 
Insects or Diseases 
Planting 
Marketing 
Fire Damage 
Taxation 

Ornamental Tree^ 



No. 
. 23 
. 9 
. 11 
. 8 
1 
4 

. 12 



No. 



Totals 



68 



5. 



State Plantations 



We are gradually reducing the number of these lots, because our policy 
is not to take over any new ones, and when these lots which we have, art 
redeemed by the original owners, we incorporate them with nearby state fo 
This reduces the number of scattered lots. In some cases however, the; 
widely separated from any state forest land and must be carried on our > 
as state plantations. 

The Gaskill Lot in Upton of fifty-nine acres planted about thirteen 
ago was given a release cutting. 

The Glebe Lot in Hopkinton was given a release cutting on about t 
acres. 

On the Baker Box Lot in Barre about seventy-one cords of standing 
were sold at one dollar a cord. This lot is included in the Barre State Fo 

The Blanchard Lot in Princeton was released over about twenty acres, 
about two thousand trees set in a portion which had been burned over 
thirty-foot fire line was cut around the lot and several days spent in gathf 
moss for the Clinton Nursery. 

On the Hansen Lot in Marlborough about one mile of wood road thn 
the lot has been brushed out and a good water hole made available. Som 
the plantation has been released, and it is expected that the whole of the 
will be covered by spring. 

On the Fiske Lot, Buckland, fifteen acres of white pine plantation whic 
sixteen years old was pruned. 

Nurseries 

Approximately 3,000,000 transplants were shipped from our nurseries 
ing the spring of 1929. This total is about the same as that of last year, 
seems to represent the normal demand. No stock was dug during the fall 
son because of the unusual drought conditions of the preceding summer 
the uncertainty of normal fall rains. We turned down several large orders 
feel that our policy was justified. One result is that we have on hand for sp 
distribution several hundred thousand five year white pine that ordina 
would have been set out on our reservations during the fall. 

Distribution of stock was as follows: 

Sale 1,095.! 

State Forests LIS] 

Town Forests 368.1 

State Institutions 433-^ 



•3,031' 

Several municipally owned water departments which have consistently tal 
from 10,000 to 40,000 trees annually have covered practically all of their lr 
ings and we look for decreased orders from these sources. 

More land has been broken at Clinton Nursery making it convenient far 
to close the reservation nurseries at Swann, October Mountain, and Moba 



P.D. 73 7 

iTrail Forests. Seedling production has been discontinued at Barnstable Nur- 
sery and now all seedling stock is being produced at our main Amherst Nur- 
sery where experiments with synthetic fertilizers in treatment of seed-beds 
'are being carried on with apparently satisfactory results. 

; Probably aided by the late spring and summer drought white pine weevil 
(has caused more than usual damage throughout the State. This has led to an 
(increased demand for red pine. Happily we have a good supply for 1930 dis- 
ttribution but advise the continued use of white pine especially when the stock 
Is to be planted in mixture with hardwoods and on cut-over hardwood lots. 
I Sales shipments during 1930 will be made from Amherst, Clinton, Otter 
(River, Erving, Bridgewater and Barnstable Nurseries, while stock at Shawme 

ind Myles Standish Nurseries will be used on those reservations. 

We shall not be prepared next year for the unexpected demand which was 
made for fir and Norway spruce for Christmas tree production. We have a 
large quantity of white spruce but because of offensive odor do not recommend 

his stock for Christmas tree purposes. 
In the spring of 1930 we shall sow a moderate quantity of balsam fir and 

Norway spruce seed to care for future demands for Christmas tree stock. 
♦This total included fall 1928 shipments. 

Exhibits 

During the past year the division of forestry enlarged its work in exhibits. 
(A. very interesting and instructive exhibit which attracted much attention was 

nade at Mechanics' Building in Boston at the Centennial Exhibit of the Massa- 
• husetts Horticultural Society. This exhibit depicted in model form the con- 

rast between forest conservation and forest devastation and also showed the 
use of the forest for recreational purposes. It was awarded a prize, which 

re have spoken of elsewhere in this report. A large exhibit was put up at 
ihe Eastern States Exposition in Springfield, emphasizing particularly the 

narketing of forest products. A smaller one on the same phase of our work 

v T as made at Northampton Fair. A large exhibit showing a model community 

vith forests, nurseries, saw-nulls and recreation on the forests was set up at 
^wampscott for the Annual Meeting of the Federation of Women's Clubs, 

nd also for the Biennial Meeting of the General Federat